Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 5

In the fifth episode of the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: the incredible case of Mary Toft, one of the biggest scandals in early medical history; an antique and macabre vase; the most astounding statue ever made. [Be sure to turn on English captions.]

If you like this episode please consider subscribing to the channel, and most of all spread the word. Enjoy!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

The Golden Mummy

What’s inside the giant surprise egg above?

How lucky! It’s a mummy!

These photos date back to 2016; they were taken in the temple of Chongfu, located on a hill in the city of Quanzhou in China, during the opening of the vase containing the mummified remains of Fu Hou, a Buddhist monk who had died in 2012 at the age of 94.

The body still sat in the lotus position and looked well-preserved; so it was washed and disinfected, wrapped in gauze, sealed in red lacquer and finally covered with gold leaves. He was dressed and placed inside a glass case, so that he could be revered by worshippers.

Mummification of those monks who are believed to have achieved a higher spiritual perfection is not unheard of: at one time a sort of “self-mummification” was even practised (I wrote about it in this old post, Italian only). And in 2015, some Dutch scholars made a CT scan of a statue belonging to the Drents Museum collection and discovered that it contained the remains of master Liquan, who died around 1100 AD.

It might seem a paradox that in the Buddhist tradition, which has made accepting impermanence (anitya) one of the cornerstones of ritual and contemplative practice, so much attention is placed on the bodies of these “holy” monks, to the extent of turning them into relics.
But veneration for such characters is probably an effect of the syncretism, which took place in China, between Buddhism and Taoism; the Buddhist concept of arhat, which indicates the person who has experienced nirvana (even without reaching the higher status of bodhisattva or true “buddhahood“), has blended with the Taoist figure of zhenren, the “True Man”, able to spontaneously conform his actions to the Tao.

In the excellent preservation of the mummies, many Buddhists see a proof that these great spiritual masters are not really dead, but simply suspended in an advanced, perfect state of meditation.

Hidden Eros

Our virtues are most frequently but vices in disguise.

(La Rochefoucauld, Reflections, 1665)

We advocate freedom, against any kind of censorship.
And yet today, sex being everywhere, legitimized, we feel we are missing something. There is in fact a strange paradox about eroticism: the need to have a prohibition, in order to transgress it.
Is sex dirty? Only when it’s being done right“, Woody Allen joked, summarizing how much the orthodox or religious restrictions have actually fostered and given a richer flavor to sexual congresses.

An enlightening example might come from the terrible best-selling books of the past few years: we might wonder why nowadays erotic literature seems to be produced by people who can’t write, for people who can’t read.
The great masterpieces of erotica appeared when it was forbidden to write about sex. Both the author (often a well-known and otherwise respectable writer) and the editor were forced to act in anonimity and, if exposed, could be subjected to a harsh sentence. Dangerous, outlaw literature: it wasn’t written with the purpose of seeling hundreds of thousands of copies, but rather to be sold under the counter to the few who could understand it.
Thus, paradoxically, such a strict censorship granted that the publishing of an erotic work corresponded to a poetic, authorial urgency. Risqué literature, in many cases, represented a necessary and unsuppressible artistic expression. The crossing of a boundary, of a barrier.

Given the current flat landscape, we inevitably look with curiosity (if not a bit of nostalgia) at those times when eroticism had to be carefully concealed from prying eyes.
An original variation of this “sunken” collective imagination are those erotic objects which in France (where they were paricularly popular) are called à système, “with a device”.
They consisted in obscene representations hidden behind a harmless appearance, and could only be seen by those who knew the mechanism, the secret move, the trick to uncover them.

1

Some twenty years ago in Chinese restaurants in Italy, liquor at the end of the meal was served in peculiar little cups that had a convex glass base: when the cup was full, the optic distorsion was corrected by the liquid and it was possible to admire, on the bottom, the picture of a half-undressed lady, who became invisible once again as the cup was emptied.
The concept behind the ancient objets à système was the same: simple objects, sometimes common home furnishings, disguising the owners’ unmentionable fantasies from potential guests coming to the house.

The most basic kind of objects à système had false bottoms and secret compartments. Indecent images could be hidden in all sorts of accessories, from snuffboxes to walking canes, from fake cheese cartons to double paintings.

Ivory box, the lid shows a double scene. XIX Century.

3

 Gioco del domino, in avorio intarsiato alla maniera dei marinai, con tavole erotiche.

Inlaid domino game, in the manner of sailors decorations, with erotic plates.

6

Walking stick knob handle.

Paintings with hidden pictures.

A young woman reads a book: if the painting is opened, her improper fantasies are visualized.

Other, slightly more elaborate objects presented a double face: a change of perspective was needed in order to discover their indecent side. A classic example from the beginning of the XX Century are ceramic sculptures or ashtrays which, when turned upside down, held some surprises.

16

14

21

The monk, a classic erotic figure, is hiding a secret inside the wicker basket on his shoulders.

Double-faced pendant: the woman’s legs can be closed, and on the back a romantic flowered heart takes shape.

Then there were objects featuring a hinge, a device that had to be activated, or removable parts. Some statuettes, such as the beautiful bronzes created by Bergman‘s famous Austrian forgery, were perfect art nouveau decorations, but still concealed a spicy little secret.

 

24

 

34

The top half of this polichrome ceramic figurine is actually a lid which, once removed, shows the Marquise crouching in the position called de la pisseuse, popularized by an infamous Rembrandt etching.

27

28

Snuffbox, sailor’s sculpture. Here the mechanism causes the soldier’s hat to “fall down”, revealing the true nature of the gallant scene.

29

Meerschaum pipe. Upon inserting a pipe cleaner into the chamber, a small lever is activated.

29b

In time, the artisans came up with ever more creative ideas.
For instance there were decorations composed of two separate figurines, showing a beautiful and chaste young girl in the company of a gallant faun. But it was enough to alter the charachters’ position in order to see the continuation of their affair, and to verify how successful the satyr’s seduction had been.

 

Even more elaborate ruses were devised to disguise these images. The following picture shows a fake book (end of XVIII Century) hiding a secret chest. The spring keys on the bottom allow for the unrolling of a strip which contained seven small risqué scenes, appearing through the oval frame.

42

The following figures were a real classic, and with many variations ended up printed on pillboxes, dishes, matchstick boxes, and several other utensiles. At first glance, they don’t look obscene at all; their secret becomes only clear when they are turned uspide down, and the bottom part of the drawing is covered with one hand (you can try it yourself below).

43

43b

The medals in the picture below were particularly ingenious. Once again, the images on both sides showed nothing suspicious if examied by the non-initiated. But flipping the medal on its axis caused them to “combine” like the frames of a movie, and to appear together. The results can be easily imagined.

44

In closing, here are some surprising Chinese fans.
In his book La magia dei libri (presented in NYC in 2015), Mariano Tomatis reports several historical examples of “hacked books”, which were specifically modified to achieve a conjuring effect. These magic fans work in similar fashion: they sport innocent pictures on both sides, provided that the fan is opened as usual from left to right. But if the fan is opened from right to left, the show gets kinky.

45 46

A feature of these artisan creations, as opposed to classic erotic art, was a constant element of irony. The very concept of these objects appears to be mocking and sardonic.
Think about it: anyone could keep some pornographic works locked up in a safe. But to exhibit them in the living room, before unsuspecting relatives and acquaintances? To put them in plain view, under the nose of your mother-in-law or the visiting reverend?

That was evidently the ultimate pleasure, a real triumph of dissimulation.

Playing card with nude watermark, made visible by placing it in front of a candle.

Such objects have suffered the same loss of meaning afflicting libertine literature; as there is no real reason to produce them anymore, they have become little more than a collector’s curiosity.
And nonetheless they can still help us to better understand the paradox we talked about in the beginning: the objets à système manage to give us a thrill only in the presence of a taboo, only as long as they are supposed to remain under cover, just like the sexual ghosts which according to Freud lie behind the innocuous images we see in our dreams.
Should we interpret these objects as symbols of bourgeois duplicity, of the urge to maintain at all cost an honorable facade? Were they instead an attempt to rebel against the established rules?
And furthermore, are we sure that sexual transgression is so revolutionary as it appears, or does it actually play a conservative social role in regard to the Norm?

Eventually, making sex acceptable and bringing it to light – depriving it of its part of darkness – will not cause our desire to vanish, as desire can always find its way. It probably won’t even impoverish art or literature, which will (hopefully) build new symbolic imagery suitable for a “public domain” eroticism.
The only aspect which is on the brink of extinction is precisely that good old idea of transgression, which also animated these naughty knick-knacks. Taking a look at contemporary conventions on alternative sexuality, it would seem that the fall of taboos has already occurred. In the absence of prohibitions, with no more rules to break, sex is losing its venomous and dangerous character; and yet it is conquering unprecedented serenity and new possibilities of exploration.

So what about us?
We would like to have our cake and eat it too: we advocate freedom, against any kind of censorship, but secretely keep longing for that exquisite frisson of danger and sin.

Untitled-2

The images in this article are for the most part taken from Jean-Pierre Bourgeron, Les Masques d’Eros – Les objets érotiques de collection à système (1985, Editions de l’amateur, Paris).
The extraordinary collection of erotic objects assembled by André Pieyre de Mandiargues (French poet and writer close to the Surrealist movement) was the focus of a short film by Walerian Borowczyk:
Une collection particulière (1973) can be seen on YouTube.

The mysteries of Sansevero Chapel – II

macchine

The Prince, just like a sorcerer, is stirring the preparation in a big cauldron. Eventually, the long-awaited reaction takes place: a mysterious liquid is ready. On the other side of the room, the two bound and gagged servants can’t even scream anymore. The man is sobbing, while the woman, even immobilized, stays vigilant and alert — perhaps the new life she carries in her womb prevents her from giving in to fear, commanding an already impossible defense. The Prince hasn’t got much time, he has to act quickly. He pours the liquid down a strange pump, then he gets close to his victims: in their eyes he sees an unnameable terror. He starts with the man, puncturing the jugular vein and injecting the liquid right into his bloodstream with a syringe. The heart will pump the preparation throughout the body, and the Prince watches the agonizing man’s face as the dense poison begins to circulate. There, it’s all done: the servant is dead. It will take two to three hours for the mixture to solidify, and surely more than a month for the putrified flesh to fall off the skeleton and the network of veins, arteries and capillaries the process turned into marble.
Now it’s the woman’s turn.

mac_anato

What you just read is the legend surrounding the two “anatomical machines” still visible in the Underground Chamber of the Sansevero Chapel. According to this story, Prince Raimondo di Sangro created them by sacrifying the life of his servants in order to obtain an exact representation of the vascular system. to an otherwise impossible to achieve level of accuracy. Even Benedetto Croce mentioned the legend in his  Storie e leggende napoletane (1919): “with the pretext of a minor fault, he had two of his servants killed, a man and a woman, and their bodies weirdly embalmed so that they showed all their internal viscera, the arteries and veins, and kept them locked in a closet…“. The two “machines” are in fact a man and a woman (pregnant, even if the fetus was stolen in the Sixties), their skeletons still wrapped in the thick net of circulatory apparatus.

macchine-anatomiche

How were the “machines” really built?
The answer is maybe less exciting but also less cruel than legend has it: they were created through great expertise and great patience. And not by Raimondo di Sangro himself: in fact, the Prince commissioned this work in 1763-64 to Giuseppe Salerno, a physician from Palermo, providing for the iron wire and wax necessary to the construction, and gratifying the Sicilian artist with a nice pension for the rest of his life. If the skeletons are undoubtedly authentic, the whole vascular system was recreated using wire, which was then wrapped up in silk and later imbued in a peculiar mix of pigmented beewax and varnish, allowing the wire to be manipulated, bent in every direction and acting as a shock-absorbant material during transportation.
Giuseppe Salerno was not the only person to build such “machines”, for as early as 1753 and 1758 in Palermo a doctor called Paolo Graffeo had already presented a similar couple of anatomical models, complete with a 4-month-old fetus.

anato1

IMG_5891

The “black” legend about servants mercilessly killed stems from the figure of Raimondo di Sangro, whose life and work — just like the Sammartino’s Christ we talked about in our previous article — seem to be covered by a veil, albeit a symbolic one.
An extraordinary intellectual and inventor, chemistry, physics and technology enthusiast, Raimondo di Sangro was always regarded as suspisious because of his Freemasonry and alchemic interests, so much so that he became some sort of devil in popular fantasy.

Raimondo_di_Sangro

At the dawn of science, in the middle of XVIII Century, rationalism had yet to abandon alchemic symbology: alchemists obviously worked on concrete matter (chemistry will later grow from these very researches), but every procedure or preparation was also interpreted according to different metaphysical readings. Raimondo di Sangro claimed he invented tens of contraptions, such as a folding stage, a color typography, a sea chariot, hydraulic machines and alchemic marbles, fireproof paper and waterproof tissues, and even a much-celebrated “eternal candle”; but all the information about these creations come from his own Lettera apologetica, published in 1750, and some scholars maintain that these very inventions, whether they really existed or not, should be interpreted as symbols of the Prince’s alchemic research. Accordingly, the originary placement of the “anatomical machines”, inside the Phoenix Apartment on a revolving platform, looks like a symbolic choice: maybe Raimondo di Sangro thought of them as a depiction of the rubedo, a stage in the search for the philosopher’s stone in which matter recomposes itself, granting immortality.

Today, the two “machines” still amaze scholars for their realism and accuracy, and they prove that in the XVIII Century an almost perfect knowledge of the circulatory system had already been reached. Modern versions of these models, created through injection of sylicon polymers (this time on real cadavers), can be seen throughout the well-known Body Worlds exhibitions coordinated by Gunther Von Hagens, the inventor of plastination.

Here is some more info (in Italian): an article on the Prince buying the machines; an in-depth analysis of his inventions’ esoteric symbolism; an essay on Raimondo di Sangro in reference to his relationship with Free Masonry. And, of course, the Sansevero Chapel Museum website.

You can read the first part of this article here.

The mysteries of Sansevero Chapel – I

If you have never fallen victim to the Stendhal syndrome, then you probably have yet to visit the Cappella Sansevero in Naples.
The experience is hard to describe. Entering this space, full to the brim with works of art, you might almost feel assaulted by beauty, a beauty you cannot escape, filling every detail of your field of vision. The crucial difference here, in respect to any other baroque art collection, is that some of the works exposed inside the chapel do not offer just an aesthetic pleasure, but hinge on a second, deeper level of emotion: wonder.
Some of these are seemingly “impossible” sculptures, much too elaborate and realistic to be the result of a simple chisel, and the gracefulness of shapes is rendered with a technical dexterity that is hard to conceive.

The Release from Deception (Il Disinganno), is, for example, an astounding sculpted group: one could spend hours admiring the intricate net, held by the male figure, and wonder how Queirolo was able to extract it from a single marble block.

The Chastity (La Pudicizia) by Corradini, with its drapery veiling the female character as if it was transparent, is another “mystery” of sculpting technique, where the stone seems to have lost its weight, becoming ethereal and almost floating. Imagine how the artist started his work from a squared block of marble, how his mind’s eye “saw” this figure inside of it, how he patiently removed all which didn’t belong, freeing the figure from the stone little by little, smoothing the surface, refining, chiselling every wrinkle of her veil.

But the attention is mostly drawn by the most famous art piece displayed in the chapel, the Veiled Christ.
This sculpture has fascinated visitors for two and a half centuries, astounding artists and writers (from the Marquis de Sade to Canova), and is considered one of the world’s best sculpted masterpieces.
Completed in 1753 by Giuseppe Sanmartino and commissioned by Raimondo di Sangro, it portrays Christ deposed after crucifixion, covered by a transparent veil. This veil is rendered with such subtlety as to be almost deceiving to the eye, and the effect seen in person is really striking: one gets the impression that the “real” sculpture is lying underneath, and that the shroud could be easily grabbed and lifted.

It’s precisely because of Sanmartino’s extraordinary virtuosity in sculpting the veil that a legend surrounding this Christ dies hard – fooling from time to time even specialized magazines and otherwise irreproachable art websites.
Legend has it that prince Raimondo di Sangro, who commissioned the work, actually fabricated the veil himself, laying it down over Sanmartino’s sculpture and petrifying it with an alchemic method of his own invention; hence the phenomenal liquidness of the drapery, and the “transparence” of the tissue.

This legend keeps coming back, in the internet era, thanks to articles such as this:

The news is the recent discovery that the veil is not made of marble, as was believed until now, but of fine cloth, marbled through an alchemic procedure by the Prince himself, so that it became a whole with the underlying sculpture. In the Notarial Archives, the contract between Raimondo di Sangro and Sanmartino regarding the statue has been found. In it, the sculptor commits himself to deliver “a good and perfect statue depicting Our Lord dead in a natural pose, to be shown inside the Prince’s gentilitial church”. Raimondo di Sangro binds himself, in addition to supplying the marble, “to make a Shroud of weaved fabric, which will be placed over the sculpture; after this, the Prince will manipulate it through his own inventions; that is, coating the veil with a subtle layer of pulverized marble… until it looks like it’s sculpted with the statue”. Sammartino also commits to “never reveal, after completing the statue, the Prince’s method for making the shroud that covers the statue”. With this amazing contract, comes another document describing the recipe for powdered marble. If the two documents unequivocally prove the limits of Sammartino’s skills, they also show the alchemic genius of Sansevero, who put his expertise at the service of the hermetic doctrine, realizing one of the most important mysteric images of christian symbolism, that Holy Shroud Jesus was wrapped in, after he died on the cross.

(Excerpt from Restaurars)

Digging a bit deeper, it looks like this “sensational” discovery is not even recent, but goes back to the Eighties. It was made by neapolitan researcher Clara Miccinelli, who became interested in Raimondo di Sangro after being contacted by his spirit during a seance. Miccinelli published a couple of books, in 1982 and 1984, centered on the enigmatic figure of the Prince, freemason and alchemist, a character depicted in folklore as both a mad scientist and a genius.
The document Miccinelli found in the Archives is actually a fake. Here is what the Sansevero Chapel Museum has to say about it:

The document […], transcribed and published by Clara Miccinelli, is unanimously considered nonauthentic by scholars. In particular, a very accurate analysis of the document was conducted by Prof. Rosanna Cioffi, who in note 107, page 147 of her book “La Cappella Sansevero. Arte barocca e ideologia massonica” (sec. ed., Salerno 1994) lists and discusses as much as nine reasons – frankly inconfutable – for which the document cannot be held to be authentic (from the absence of watermark on the paper, to the handwriting being different from every other deed compiled by notary Liborio Scala, to the fact that the sheet of paper is loose and not included in the volume collecting all the deeds for the year 1752, to the notary’s “signum” which just in this document is different from all the other deeds, etc.). […] There are on the other hand certainly authentic documents, that can be consulted freely and publicly, in the Historic Archive of the Banco di Napoli, unearthed by Eduardo Nappi and published on different occasions: from a negotiable instrument dated December 16 1752, in which Raimondo di Sangro describes the statue in the making as “a statue of Our Lord being dead, and covered with a veil from the same marble”, to the payment of 30 ducats (as a settlment of 500 ducats) on February 13 1754, in which the Prince of Sansevero unequivocally describes the Christ as being “covered with a transparent shroud of the same marble”. All this without taking into account one of the Prince’s famous letters to Giraldi on the “eternal light”, published for the first time in May 1753 in “Novelle Letterarie” in Florence, in which he thus talks about the Christ: “the marble statue of Our Lord Jesus Christ being dead, wrapped in a transparent veil of the same marble, but executed with such expertise as to fool the most accurate observers”. […]
All the documentary evidence, therefore, points to one conclusion: the Veiled Christ is a work entirely made of marble. To settle things once and for all, there was eventually a scientific non-invasive analysis conducted by the company “Ars Mensurae”, which concluded that the only material present in this work is marble. The analysis report was published in 2008 in: S. Ridolfi, “Analisi di materiale lapideo tramite sistema portatile di Fluorescenza X: il caso del ‘Cristo Velato’ nella Cappella Sansevero di Napoli”. […]
We believe that the fact that Sanmartino’s Christ is entirely made from marble only adds charm […] to the work.

Miccinelli has subsequently found in her home a chest containing an incredible series of Jesuit manuscripts which completely overturn the whole precolonial history of Andean civilizations as we know it. The “case” has divided the ethnological community, even jeopardizing accademic relationships with Peru (see this English article), as many italian specialists believe the documents to be authentic, whereas by the majority of Anglosaxon and South American scholars they are considered artfully constructed fakes. The harsh debate did not discourage Miccinelli, who just can’t seem to be able to open a drawer without discovering some rare unpublished work: in 1991 it was the turn of an original writing by Dumas, which enabled her to decrypt the alchemical symbologies of the Count of Monte Cristo.

The second part of this article is dedicated to another legend surrounding the Sansevero Chapel, namely the one regarding the two “anatomical machines” preserved in the Underground Chamber. You can read it here.

Hananuma Masakichi

2011-04-03-self-portrait

Non molti conoscono lo scultore giapponese Hananuma Masakichi, nato nel 1832, e la sua triste e straordinaria storia. Quasi un secolo prima che nell’ambito dell’arte si incominciasse a parlare di iperrealismo, Masakichi riuscì a stupire il mondo intero con una scultura praticamente indistinguibile dalla realtà.

A quanto si racconta, la statua in questione avrebbe avuto una genesi del tutto particolare. Quando Hananuma Masakichi aveva circa cinquant’anni, si ammalò di tubercolosi: era convinto di avere ancora poco tempo da vivere. Eppure Masakichi era innamorato di una donna, e quando si ama si trova anche nei momenti più disperati la forza di reagire. Così l’artista decise che avrebbe tenuto duro, sacrificando ogni attimo che gli restava, per lasciare alla propria amata un ricordo di sé che le tenesse compagnia dopo la sua morte. Quello sarebbe stato il suo ultimo, grandioso progetto: creare un’esatta copia di se stesso, a grandezza naturale e perfetta in ogni minimo dettaglio, che potesse durare per sempre. In quel modo, non sarebbe mai veramente scomparso dalla vita e dal cuore della donna dei suoi sogni.

Masakichi cominciò a lavorare alla scultura mediante specchi girevoli, in modo da poter osservare e studiare ogni parte del proprio corpo, e replicarla con il legno. La pazienza e il sacrificio necessari per raggiungere il suo scopo lasciano sbigottiti, soprattutto se pensiamo che la statua non venne scolpita a partire da un blocco unico: l’artista incise ogni muscolo, ogni vena, ogni minima protuberanza del suo fisico servendosi di minuscoli pezzi di legno separati, striscioline che poi assemblava con incastri a coda di rondine e colla. Non usò nemmeno un chiodo metallico, ma soltanto piccoli agganci e pioli di legno per collegare l’enorme quantità di ritagli che compongono la statua, cava al suo interno. Si calcola che il numero di pezzetti utilizzati stia tra le 2.000 e le 5.000 unità. Eppure i vari dettagli sono incastrati ed uniti con una tale perfezione che perfino esaminando la superficie della statua con una lente d’ingrandimento si fatica a riconoscere la linea di “saldatura” fra un segmento e l’altro. Ogni ruga, ogni tendine, ogni increspatura della pelle venne replicata ossessivamente da Masakichi. Ma non finisce qui.

Masakichi-statue

Dopo aver dipinto e laccato la statua in modo da replicare il colore e il tono della sua pelle, Masakichi si spinse ancora oltre. Desiderava infondere maggior vita alla statua, renderla a tutti gli effetti una parte di sé. Così cominciò a praticare dei piccolissimi fori per replicare la porosità della pelle, e ad incollarvi i propri peli e capelli. Li trasferiva, dal suo corpo alla statua, facendo bene attenzione che la posizione rimanesse la medesima: i capelli sulla tempia destra della statua provenivano dalla tempia destra dell’artista, e così via. Masakichi proseguì, donando alla sua opera capelli, ciglia, sopracciglia, fino alla peluria delle parti intime.

Certo, poi la leggenda pretenderebbe che, non ancora soddisfatto, nell’ormai ossessivo intento di consacrare alla statua (e alla donna che amava) il rimasuglio di vita che gli restava, Masakichi si fosse strappato le unghie da mani e piedi per applicarle alle dita della statua (c’è chi afferma che addirittura i pochi denti visibili fra le labbra socchiuse della statua sarebbero quelli dell’artista). Ma non c’è bisogno di arrivare a questi fantasiosi estremi per rimanere stupefatti dall’incredibile perfezionismo di Masakichi.

Finalmente, nel 1885, la sua opera fu compiuta. Come ultimo tocco, l’artista sistemò i propri occhiali sul naso del suo doppio, e gli mise uno scalpello nella mano destra. Nella sinistra invece, con perfetto senso della vertigine simbolica, Masakichi pose una maschera, che gli occhi della statua sembrano contemplare fissamente. Un doppelgänger che si specchia nella sua stessa ambigua identità.

La somiglianza era davvero strabiliante: secondo i racconti dell’epoca, quando Masakichi si metteva in posa di fianco alla sua statua, la gente faticava a comprendere immediatamente quale fosse l'”originale” e quale la “copia”. Nella fotografia qui sotto, ad esempio, la statua è quella a sinistra.

Masakichi-statue2

La storia, così come ci viene tramandata, ha un triste epilogo. La donna tanto agognata, per amore della quale la titanica impresa era stata portata a termine, nonostante tutto rifiutò Hananuma. L’artista non morì di tubercolosi, ma visse ancora una decina d’anni, fino a terminare i suoi giorni in povertà nel 1895 (pare a causa di una diagnosi sbagliata).

Fu Robert Ripley, il disegnatore-avventuriero di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo, che all’inizio della sua carriera di collezionista dell’insolito, negli anni ’30, acquistò per dieci dollari la statua di Masakichi esposta in un saloon di Chinatown a San Francisco. L’autoritratto dell’artista giapponese rimase sempre uno dei suoi pezzi favoriti fra le migliaia che accumulò negli anni, e la esibì più volte nei suoi vari musei attraverso il mondo, e anche in casa propria.

625683_420652391361951_1441235524_n

598938_420654488028408_1460619474_n

549809_420651518028705_1497294977_n

540991_420654124695111_801388779_n

296304_420655841361606_434227253_n

64873_420653294695194_956981915_n

La statua è sopravvissuta a ben due terremoti, quello di San Francisco nel 1989 (era posizionata su una piattaforma rotante, venne sbalzata via e ci vollero quattro mesi per restaurarla) e quello di Northridge del 1994. Oggi non viene esposta se non in occasioni eccezionali: nonostante i danni subiti siano evidenti, la scultura di Hananuma Masakichi sorprende ancora oggi per realismo e perfezione del dettaglio, e si può soltanto immaginare quale effetto potesse avere sul pubblico di fine ‘800. Una replica della statua (una “copia della copia” del corpo di Hananuma…) è visibile nel London Ripley’s Odditorium a Piccadilly Circus.

Il divoratore di bambini

brn

La Svizzera, si sa, è un posto tranquillo e la capitale elvetica, Berna, accoglie il visitatore con il distillato delle migliori attrattive nazionali: aria fresca, cucina prelibata, pulizia, precisione e ordine. Il centro storico della città è perfettamente conservato, e sorge sulla penisola all’interno di un’ansa del fiume Aare. Proprio nel cuore di questo gioiello di architettura medievale, quasi a contrastare con l’operosa ma placida atmosfera della Kornhausplatz, si erge un simbolo tutt’altro che mite e sereno. Si tratta del Kindlifresser, il Mangiatore di Bambini.

bern14

25830987
Alla base della colonna decorata, il fregio mostra degli orsi bruni (simbolo della città), armati di tutto punto, che partono per la guerra suonando strumenti militari come una cornamusa e un tamburo. In alto, invece, ecco il vero protagonista della composizione: un orco, appollaiato su un capitello corinzio, si infila in gola un bambino nudo, mentre altri neonati spuntano da un sacco per le provviste.

url

3253703958_35bed3beba
La Kindlifresserbrunnen, costruita nel 1546, è una delle fontane più antiche della città, ed è anche un esempio di come la storia e la cultura possano talvolta “perdersi” e venire dimenticate: oggi, infatti, nessuno sa perché quella statua stia lì, e quale fosse il suo significato originario.

010
Quello che si sa di certo è che l’autore della scultura è Hans Gieng, a cui secondo gli studiosi si devono quasi tutte le splendide fontane cinquecentesche che adornano la Città Vecchia, come ad esempio il bellissimo Sansone che uccide il leone (Simsonbrunnen). Ma, a differenza delle altre, l’orco che divora i bambini non è una rappresentazione classica facilmente comprensibile, e non essendo rimasto negli archivi nessun accenno al suo senso allegorico originale, per gli storici il Kindlifresser rimane un mistero.

4927976262_81f4c8c3da_o
Le teorie sono diverse. Secondo alcuni, potrebbe trattarsi di una raffigurazione di Crono, il Titano della mitologia Greca che, per non essere spodestato dai propri figli, li divorò ad uno ad uno mentre erano ancora in fasce (unico sopravvissuto: Zeus).

Un’altra teoria vede nella grottesca figura una sorta di monito per la comunità ebraica della città. In effetti pare che il vestito del Kindlifresser fosse originariamente pitturato in giallo, colore dei Giudei; anche il copricapo che indossa ricorda effettivamente il cappello conico imposto in Germania agli ebrei askenaziti, assieme alla rotella cucita sulle vesti o sul mantello. Se questo fosse vero, la statua avrebbe avuto allora un intento denigratorio collegato alla cosiddetta “accusa del sangue“, cioè alla diceria che gli israeliti praticassero sacrifici e omicidi rituali.

11552894583_995d82b938_z
Ma le ipotesi non si fermano qui. C’è chi suppone che il Kindlifresser sia il fratello maggiore del Duca Berchtold V. von Zähringen, fondatore di Berna, che in un accesso di follia avrebbe mangiato i bambini della città; secondo altri, il personaggio misterioso sarebbe il Cardinale Matthäus Schiner, comandante militare in diverse battaglie nel Nord Italia; secondo altri studi potrebbe trattarsi di uno spauracchio pensato perché i bambini stessero alla larga dalla celebre fossa degli orsi che si apriva lì vicino; infine, l’inquietante figura potrebbe semplicemente essere una maschera collegata alla Fastnacht, il Carnevale nato proprio nelle prime decadi del 1500 e ancora oggi celebrato in Svizzera.

Kindlifresserbrunnen_Bern_Schweiz
La ridda di congetture non intacca la foga con cui il Kindlifresser, da 500 anni, consuma il suo crudele pasto; spaventando i bambini bernesi, attirando frotte di turisti e ispirando artisti e scrittori.

Kristian Burford

kristian-burford-02

Entrate in una galleria d’arte, e in una stanza vedete uno spazio delimitato da lunghe tende multicolori che evidentemente nascondono qualcosa. Per guardarvi dentro, però, siete costretti ad avvicinare gli occhi a uno degli strappi nella stoffa: appena riuscite a vedere all’interno, ecco che vi appare un ambiente domestico, e di colpo vi sentite come se steste spiando da un buco nella serratura. Sentite un piccolo brivido quando capite che la “stanza” non è vuota: c’è una figura umana, un giovane uomo, allungato sul letto. Sembra sprofondato in una drammatica incoscienza, ma mentre lo osservate vi rendete conto di altri piccoli dettagli: c’è il monitor di un computer acceso vicino a lui, mentre una telecamera è montata su un treppiede e puntata sul letto. Ecco che di colpo la scena assume una luce diversa, mentre affiora una possibile narrazione: l’uomo ha forse appena fatto del sesso virtuale? L’abbandono in cui lo vediamo è quello che segue l’orgasmo? Stiamo ancora guardando attraverso le tende, ipnotizzati dalla scena, da quella scultura iperrealistica di un corpo stremato e dalla storia che crediamo di indovinare, e allo stesso tempo siamo imbarazzati per la nostra morbosa curiosità.

kristian-burford-01

kristian-burford-04-d7cd4205

kristian-burford-03-a929198f

ta-kb-cs-05

L’artista losangelino Kristian Burford senza dubbio ama mettere il suo pubblico a disagio. Le sue perturbanti installazioni ci pongono nella scomoda situazione di dover fare i conti con le nostre pulsioni più nascoste, con il lato oscuro del desiderio e con i nostri istinti voyeuristici.

8 9

Spesso, nei suoi diorami ricchissimi di dettagli, l’artista decide di limitare la libertà dello spettatore, obbligandolo a dei punti di vista predeterminati: si può osservare questi set soltanto da particolari angolazioni, tramite feritoie o spiragli, proprio come dei “guardoni”. Una sua opera, ad esempio, mostra uno scorcio di stanza d’albergo, con una figura nuda sullo sfondo che, di spalle, sta facendo qualcosa che non si riesce a distinguere chiaramente.

 ob_c13c2d_collection-pinault-a-la-conciergerie-dsc0126

6a00d8341bfb1653ef019b006efaa6970c-550wi

Ma non è soltanto questo aspetto a rendere destabilizzanti le sue opere tridimensionali. Le sculture in cera mostrano un’intimità (dall’esplicita connotazione sessuale) che non è mai solare, ma al contrario spesso travagliata. I volti dei protagonisti mostrano una sottile tragicità, come se fossero racchiusi in una sorta di melanconia, tutti protesi verso il loro interno dopo una probabile auto-soddisfazione erotica. Ed è il nostro stesso mondo interiore a venire messo in discussione, mentre lo stratagemma del voyeurismo ci convince di assistere ad un momento speciale, segreto, fissato nell’immobilità del soggetto.

 Art?

22

32

321

Le ultime opere di Burford si distaccano dalle precedenti ma ne proseguono la riflessione sullo sguardo e sull’individuo. All’interno di grandi box di vetro, ecco un tavolo da ufficio, anonimo. In piedi, una figura femminile completamente nuda e senza capelli si riflette in un freddo gioco di specchi che la moltiplicano all’infinito. Sembra uno di quegli incubi in cui ci si presenta al lavoro, accorgendosi subito dopo di essere nudi.

 maxresdefault

kristian-burford-audition-scene-1-in-love

Eppure, mentre guardiamo dentro a questi box, ne restiamo esclusi. Da fuori, possiamo osservare con sguardo da entomologo la nudità senza protezioni della scultura, la vediamo immersa in centinaia di copie di se stessa. Tutte inermi, confinate in spazi lavorativi angusti, vittime di un crudele gioco che le priva di qualsiasi identità o privacy.

Kristian-Burford

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/77172327]

Che siano confuse stanze di passioni tormentate, o algide scatole che rinchiudono l’individuo in un contesto disumanizzante, le installazioni di Burford – in maniera obliqua, scomoda e incisiva – sembrano parlare sempre e comunque delle nostre terribili, immense solitudini.

6

L’effigie di Sarah Hare

Stow Bardolph è piccolo villaggio del Norfolk, in Inghilterra, che conta 1000 abitanti, quasi tutti contadini. Un turista che per caso si trovasse a passare per quelle piatte campagne disseminate di pecore non troverebbe nulla di particolarmente interessante da visitare nel minuscolo borgo, e finirebbe a rintanarsi di fianco al focolare nell’unico pub di Stow Bardolph, chiamato Hare Arms, che più che un pub è una tenuta, attorniato com’è da giardini in cui beccheggiano pavoni e galline.

DSCF6533

8337081_123894258815
Anche una visita alla chiesetta del paese, dedicata alla Trinità, potrebbe ad una prima occhiata rivelarsi deludente, visto l’interno spoglio e “povero”. Eppure, in un angolo, c’è uno strano armadietto chiuso. Chi l’ha aperto, giura che non scorderà più quel momento.

Dscf6508

8337081_123894248333
“Avevo visto sue fotografie negli anni, da quando l’avevo scoperta a scuola, ma nulla mi avrebbe potuto preparare al brivido della porta dell’armadietto che si apriva. Allora ho capito il motivo di questa porta – lei è terrificante, il suo volto tozzo, verrucoso, lo sguardo sprezzante”, riporta un visitatore.

Dscf6510
Ma chi è la donna ritratta nella scultura?
La macabra effigie in cera contenuta nell’armadietto è quella di Sarah Hare, morta nel 1744 all’età di 55 anni dopo che, secondo la leggenda, aveva osato cucire di domenica, nel giorno di riposo dedicato al Signore; si era quindi punta un dito, forse per punizione divina, soccombendo in seguito alla setticemia. A parte questo episodio, la sua vita non era stata per nulla eccezionale. Eppure il suo testamento, se da un lato ostentava una carità e una generosità notevoli, dall’altra includeva una strana disposizione: “Desidero che sei uomini poveri della parrocchia di Stow o Wimbotsham mi sotterrino, e ricevano cinque scellini per il servizio. Desidero che tutti i poveri di Alms Row abbiano due scellini e una moneta da sei penny ciascuno davanti alla mia tomba, prima che mi calino giù. […] Desidero che la mia faccia e le mie mani siano modellati in cera, con un pezzo di velluto color porpora quale ornamento sulla mia testa, e messi in una cassa di mogano con un vetro antestante, e che siano fissati a questo modo vicino al luogo dove riposa il mio cadavere; sul contenitore potranno essere incisi il mio nome e la data della mia morte nel modo che più si desidera. Se non riuscirò ad eseguire tutto questo mentre sono ancora in vita, potrà essere fatto dopo la mia morte”.

8337081_123894253992
Non sappiamo se i calchi del volto e delle mani vennero eseguiti mentre Sarah Hare era ancora viva, oppure post-mortem: quello che è chiaro è che il suo testamento venne rispettato alla lettera. Possiamo immaginarci la solenne processione con cui il busto venne portato, nell’armadio di legno, fino alla cappella di famiglia che l’avrebbe infine ospitato per i secoli a venire.

Di sculture funebri in marmo che ritraggono il defunto è pieno il mondo, ma la statua in cera di Sarah Hare è l’unica di questo tipo in Inghilterra, se si escludono le effigi presenti nell’abbazia di Westminster. La cosa più straordinaria è l’ordinarietà del soggetto – una donna non celebre, né nobile, di certo non bella, che nella sua vita non diede alcun contributo particolare alla Storia.

DSCF6510 0
Nel 1987 la statua venne restaurata da alcuni esperti che lavoravano anche per Madame Tussauds, assieme all’armadio che negli anni era stato attaccato dai roditori, e all’antica stoffa di velluto rosso ormai quasi distrutta. Oggi quindi l’immagine di cera resiste ancora, quasi 270 anni dopo la sua morte.

In questi 270 anni si sono avvicendati re e regine, l’impero Britannico è sorto e crollato, sono state combattute sanguinose guerre di dimensioni inaudite, il mondo e la vita sono cambiati radicalmente. Ma, in uno sperduto paesino di campagna, dietro un’anta di mogano, ancora non è finita la lunga, immobile e silenziosa veglia che Sarah Hare si è scelta come propria personale forma di immortalità.

2382602226_ab0d8f3851_z

Chiesa e anatomia

Qualche tempo fa Lidia, una nostra lettrice, ci segnalava la presenza della statua di un écorché (“scorticato”, una delle raffigurazioni classiche dell’anatomia umana) proprio all’interno del Duomo di Milano: si tratta del celebre San Bartolomeo di Marco D’Agrate. Eccolo qui sotto.


Lidia si chiedeva: com’è possibile che una statua simile venisse posta all’interno di un Duomo, proprio in un periodo (il XVI secolo) in cui l’utilizzo di cadaveri per la dissezione comportava la scomunica?

Questo apparente paradosso ci dà la possibilità di fare luce su alcuni miti relativi al Medioevo, in particolare riguardo ai rapporti fra la Chiesa cattolica e lo studio dell’anatomia.


L’idea che molti hanno degli albori degli studi anatomici e chirurgici si ricollega all’idea di Medioevo come di un’epoca buia, pervasa da ignoranza e superstizione; in questo contesto, i primi studiosi dell’anatomia sarebbero stati dei pionieri “fuorilegge”, che riesumavano cadaveri ed eseguivano le loro dissezioni di nascosto, perché su queste azioni gravava la pena della scomunica o, ancora peggio, la reclusione. Leonardo da Vinci, responsabile delle prime dettagliate illustrazioni dell’interno del corpo umano, e inventore del moderno disegno anatomico (quello “esploso”, che mostra come gli organi siano posizionati e si rapportino l’uno all’altro), effettuò le sue dissezioni in gran segreto, o almeno così ci hanno sempre raccontato, per evitare ritorsioni dalla Chiesa.

Preparatevi però a una sorpresa: queste idee sono state grandemente ridimensionate dagli studiosi a partire dagli anni ’70, fino ad arrivare a sostenere che la Chiesa cattolica non abbia mai condannato né le dissezioni, né lo studio dell’anatomia, né tantomeno la chirurgia.


Da cosa nasce allora questa confusione? Principalmente dalla cosiddetta “tesi del conflitto”, nata in ambito positivista nel XIX secolo: alcuni studiosi di storia infatti (White e Draper in particolare) sostennero che la Chiesa fosse da sempre stata in conflitto con la scienza, perché quest’ultima contraddice i miracoli; lo sviluppo delle materie scientifiche, quindi, sarebbe andato contro gli interessi del Pontefice e della comunità ecclesiastica, entrambi intenti a mantenere salvi i proventi della loro “vendita dell’Agnus Dei”. Quest’idea godette subito di grande popolarità, benché le fonti coeve non riportassero esplicitamente traccia di questa lotta acerrima fra scienza e religione. Gran parte degli autori, a dir la verità, non citava e spesso non si prendeva nemmeno la briga di verificare e studiare approfonditamente il diritto canonico e gli atti dei concili.

A complicare le cose, ci furono un paio di canoni e bolle papali che vennero interpretati in maniera errata o parziale. È vero infatti che alcune restrizioni erano state decise dalla Chiesa per vietare a parte del clero di studiare l’anatomia. Ad esempio, un canone approvato in diversi concili ecclesiastici prevedeva che fosse proibito a monaci e canonici regolari lo studio della medicina. Ma se si leggono approfonditamente le motivazioni di questa proibizione, si scopre che essa veniva messa in atto per limitare quella “prava e detestabile consuetudine” che alcuni monaci avevano preso di studiare “giurisprudenza e medicina al fine di ricavarne un guadagno temporale”. Un monaco avrebbe dovuto dedicarsi alla preghiera e al conforto delle anime – ma al tempo molti si dedicavano invece alla medicina e alla giurisprudenza come secondo lavoro; ed era questa sete di guadagno che, secondo il canone, male si addiceva a degli uomini di fede. D’altronde il canone è tutto incentrato sul problema dell’avidità, e vi si proibiscono anche simonia e usura: il fatto che ai monaci venisse vietato anche lo studio della giurisprudenza fa capire bene come non fosse la medicina il problema essenziale.


Un altro canone si scagliava contro quei membri della Chiesa che erano soliti “lasciare i loro chiostri per studiare le leggi e preparare medicine, con il pretesto di aiutare i corpi dei loro fratelli malati […] stabiliamo allora, con il consenso del presente concilio, che a nessuno sia permesso di partire per studiare medicina o le leggi secolari dopo aver preso i voti ed aver fatto professione di fede in un certo luogo di religione”. Anche in questo caso non viene mai proibita la pratica della medicina; vengono accusati quei ministri di Dio che abbandonano il loro chiostro per perseguire scopi differenti. Come a dire, una volta che hai preso i voti, la tua strada deve essere quella del Signore, a quello devi dedicarti, senza che altre discipline ti distraggano dai tuoi compiti.

Un altro dilemma morale era che la chirurgia curava di certo molti malati, ma spesso portava alla morte del paziente. Questo mal si conciliava con l’assunzione ad alte cariche nella Chiesa, e pertanto praticare la chirurgia fu proibito agli Ordini Maggiori (insieme, per esempio, al divieto di pronunciare sentenze di morte o di essere a capo di uomini che spargono sangue). Ancora una volta, nessuna traccia della proibizione della pratica chirurgica in sé; e ancora una volta questi divieti erano limitati soltanto a una specifica parte del clero.


Ma forse il più incredibile fra i miti relativi alla Chiesa è l’editto denominato Ecclesia abhorret a sanguine (“La Chiesa aborre dal sangue”). Questa frase, citata e ricitata nei secoli a riprova della distanza fra Chiesa e chirurgia, venne attribuita a un fantomatico editto: eppure esso non è presente in alcun canone di alcun concilio! Pare che uno storico del XVIII secolo, citando un passo delle Recherches de la France di Étienne Pasquier, abbia deciso di tradurlo in latino e di scriverlo in corsivo. Da quel momento, tutti gli storici successivi presero il motto come una citazione diretta da qualche canone, senza controllarne l’effettiva provenienza.


E le dissezioni? Anche qui, ben poco che ci confermi una presunta presa di distanza della Chiesa. Ci fu, è vero, la bolla De sepulturis, nata con l’intento di combattere l’usanza, fiorita in Terra Santa durante le Crociate, di tagliare a pezzi il corpo dei nobili e di bollirli per separare la carne dalle ossa e riportare più agevolmente le spoglie a casa, oppure per seppellirle in diversi luoghi ritenuti sacri. Nella bolla non si proibiva di fare a pezzi un corpo per scopi scientifici (la preoccupazione era rivolta appunto a quella pratica di sepoltura definita “abominevole”), ma forse la bolla poté essere liberamente interpretata e usata per limitare in alcuni rari casi anche le dissezioni anatomiche.

Quello che è certo è che i monasteri erano da sempre i depositari dei maggiori testi di anatomia e medicina, che una buona parte del clero studiava queste discipline, e che le dissezioni vennero praticate durante tutto il Medioevo senza particolari problemi. Già nel XIII secolo le autopsie erano utilizzate e legalmente permesse come pratiche sperimentali per accertare le cause di un decesso e prevenire eventuali epidemie. È proprio dal XIV secolo che la pratica della dissezione, partendo da Bologna, iniziò a diffondersi gradualmente in tutte le altre università italiane ed europee, senza trovare alcun ostacolo.


E, se ancora non siete proprio convinti che la Chiesa non avesse problemi con la dissezione di un cadavere, pensate a quello che succedeva ai corpi dei santi, spesso letteralmente smembrati appena morti, ad opera degli stessi ecclesiastici… per farne reliquie.