Living Machines: Automata Between Nature and Artifice

Article by Laura Tradii
University of Oxford,
MSc History of Science, Medicine and Technology

In a rather unknown operetta morale, the great Leopardi imagines an award competition organised by the fictitious Academy of Syllographers. Being the 19th Century the “Age of Machines”, and despairing of the possibility of improving mankind, the Academy will reward the inventors of three automata, described in a paroxysm of bitter irony: the first will have to be a machine able to act like a trusted friend, ready to assist his acquaintances in the moment of need, and refraining from speaking behind their back; the second machine will be a “steam-powered artificial man” programmed to accomplish virtuous deeds, while the third will be a faithful woman. Considering the great variety of automata built in his century, Leopardi points out, such achievements should not be considered impossible.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century, automata (from the Greek, “self moving” or “acting of itself”) had become a real craze in Europe, above all in aristocratic circles. Already a few centuries earlier, hydraulic automata had often been installed in the gardens of palaces to amuse the visitors. Jessica Riskin, author of several works on automata and their history, describes thus the machines which could be found, in the fourteenth and fifteenth century, in the French castle of Hesdin:

“3 personnages that spout water and wet people at will”; a “machine for wetting ladies when they step on it”; an “engien [sic] which, when its knobs are touched, strikes in the face those who are underneath and covers them with black or white [flour or coal dust]”.1

26768908656_4aa6fd60f9_o

26768900716_9e86ee1ded_o

In the fifteenth century, always according to Riskin, Boxley Abbey in Kent displayed a mechanical Jesus which could be moved by pulling some strings. The Jesus muttered, blinked, moved his hands and feet, nodded, and he could smile and frown. In this period, the fact that automata required a human to operate them, instead of moving of their own accord as suggested by the etymology, was not seen as cheating, but rather as a necessity.2

In the eighteenth century, instead, mechanics and engineers attempted to create automata which could move of their own accord once loaded, and this change could be contextualised in a time in which mechanistic theories of nature had been put forward. According to such theories, nature could be understood in fundamentally mechanical terms, like a great clockwork whose dynamics and processes were not much different from the ones of a machine. According to Descartes, for example, a single mechanical philosophy could explain the actions of both living beings and natural phenomena.3
Inventors attempted therefore to understand and artificially recreate the movements of animals and human beings, and the mechanical duck built by Vaucanson is a perfect example of such attempts.

With this automaton, Vaucanson purposed to replicate the physical process of digestion: the duck would eat seeds, digest them, and defecate. In truth, the automaton simply simulated these processes, and the faeces were prepared in advance. The silver swan built by John Joseph Merlin (1735-1803), instead, imitated with an astonishing realism the movements of the animal, which moved (and still moves) his neck with surprising flexibility. Through thin glass tubes, Merlin even managed to recreate the reflection of the water on which the swan seemed to float.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT05uNFb6hY

Vaucanson’s Flute Player, instead, played a real flute, blowing air into the instruments thanks to mechanical lungs, and moving his fingers. On a similar vein, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a little model of Napoleon was displayed in the United Kingdom: the puppet breathed, and it was covered in a material which imitated the texture of skin.  The advertisement for its exhibition at the Dublin’s Royal Arcade described it as a ‘splendid Work of Art’, ‘produc[ing] a striking imitation of human nature, in its Form, Color, and Texture, animated with the act of Respiration, Flexibility of the Limbs, and Elasticity of Flesh, as to induce a belief that this pleasing and really wonderful Figure is a living subject, ready to get up and speak’.4

The attempt to artificially recreate natural processes included other functions beyond movement. In 1779, the Academy of Sciences of Saint Petersburg opened a competition to mechanise the most human of all faculties, language, rewarding who would have succeeded in building a machine capable of pronouncing vowels. A decade later, Kempelen, the inventor of the famous Chess-Playing Turk, built a machine which could pronounce 19 consonants (at least according to Kempelen himself).5

In virtue of their uncanny nature, automata embody the tension between artifice and nature which for centuries has animated Western thought. The quest not only for the manipulation, but for the perfecting of the natural order, typical of the Wunderkammer or the alchemical laboratory, finds expression in the automaton, and it is this presumption that Leopardi comments with sarcasm. For Leopardi, like for some of his contemporaries, the idea that human beings could enhance what Nature already created perfect is a pernicious misconception. The traditional narrative of progress, according to which the lives of humans can be improved through technology, which separates mankind from the cruel state of nature, is challenged by Leopardi through his satire of automata. With his proverbial optimism, the author believes that all that distances humans from Nature can only be the cause of suffering, and that no improvement in the human condition shall be achieved through mechanisation and modernisation.

This criticism is substantiated by the fear that humans may become victims of their own creation, a discourse which was widespread during the Industrial Revolution. Romantic writer Jean Paul (1763-1825), for example, uses automata to satirise the society of the late eighteenth century, imagining a dystopic world in which machines are used to control the citizens and to carry out even the most trivial tasks: to chew food, to play music, and even to pray.6

The mechanical metaphors which were often used in the seventeenth century to describe the functioning of the State, conceptualised as a machine formed of different cogs or institutions, acquire here a dystopic connotation, becoming the manifestation of a bureaucratic, mechanical, and therefore dehumanising order. It is interesting to see how observations of this kind recur today in debates over Artificial Intelligence, and how, quoting Leopardi, a future is envisioned in which “the uses of machines [will come to] include not only material things, but also spiritual ones”.

A closer future than we may think, since technology modifies in entirely new directions our way of life, our understanding of ourselves, and our position in the natural order.

____________

[1]  Jessica Riskin, Frolicsome Engines: The Long Prehistory of Artificial Intelligence.
[2]  Grafton, The Devil as Automaton: Giovanni Fontana and the Meanings of a Fifteenth-Century Machine, p.56.
[3]  Grafton, p.58.
[4]  Jennifer Walls, Captivating Respiration: the “Breathing Napoleon”.
[5]  John P. Cater, Electronically Speaking: Computer Speech Generation, Howard M. Sams & Co., 1983, pp. 72-74.
[6]  Jean Paul, 1789. Discusso in Sublime Dreams of Living Machines: the Automaton in the European Imagination di Minsoo Kang.

Painting on water

If you have some old books at home, you might be acquainted with those decorated covers and flaps showing colorful designs that resemble marble patterns.
Paper marbling has very ancient origins, probably dating back to 2.000 years ago in China, even though the technique ultimately took hold in Japan during the Heian period (VIII-XII Century), under the name of suminagashi. The secret of suminagashi was jealously kept and passed on from father to son, among families of artists; the most beautiful and pleasant examples were used to adorn poems or sutras.

From Japan through the Indies, this method came to Persia and Turkey, where it became a refined art called ebru. Western travellers brought it back to Europe where marbled paper was eventually produced on a large scale to cover books and boxes.

Today in Turkey ebru is still considered a traditional art. Garip Ay (born 1984), who graduated from Mimar Sinan University in Istanbul, has become one of the best-known ebru artists in the world, holding workshops and seminars from Scandinavia to the United States. Thanks to his extraordinary talents in painting on water, he appeared in documentaries and music videos.

His latest work recently went viral: painting on black water, and using a thickening agent so that the insoluble colors could better float on the surface, Garip Ay recreated two famous Van Gogh paintings, the 1889 Starry night and the iconic Self-portrait. All in just 20 minutes (condensed in a 4-minute video).

The magic and wonder of this suprising exploit reside of course in Ay’s precise artistic execution, but what is most striking is the fluidity, unpredictability, precariousness of the aqueous support: in this regard, ebru really shows to be a product of the East.
There is no need to stress the major symbolic role played by water, and by harmonizing with its movements, in Eastern philosophical disciplines: painting on water becomes a pure exercise in wu wei, an “effortless action” which allows the color to organize following its own nature, while the artist gently puts its qualities to good use in order to obtain the desired effect. Thus, the very obstacle which appeared to make the endeavour difficult (the unsteady water, disturbed by even the smallest breath) turns into an advantage — as long as the artist doesn’t oppose it, but rather uses its natural movement.
At its heart, this technique teaches us a sublime lightness in dealing with reality, seen as a tremulous surface on which we can learn to delicately spread our own colors.

IMG_0883

Here is Garip Ay’s official website, and his YouTube channel where you can witness the fascinating creation of several other works.
On Amazon: Suminagashi: The Japanese Art of Marbling by Anne Chambers. And if you want to try marbling yourself, there is nothing better than a starter kit.

Special: Innocenzo Manzetti

We like to think scientific progress as something evolving in a clear way, relying exclusively on research and method, and that the authority of a scholar is assessed on the basis of his results. But, as it goes for all human things, many unpredictable factors may intervene in the success of a theory or discovery — human factors, as well as social, political, commercial factors: which, in a word, have nothing to do with science.

There are good possibilities you never heard about Innocenzo Manzetti, even if he was one of the most fertile and dynamic italian geniuses. And if things had turned out differently for him, less than a month ago, on the 29th of June, we would have celebrated the 150th anniversary of his major invention, which had a profound impact on history and our own lives: the telephone.

But, on the account of a streak of unlucky events you’ll read about in a moment, the paternity of the first device for long-distance transmission of sound was attributed to others. This story takes place in a time of fertile change, in the midst of an international rush for technological innovation, a no-holds-barred struggle to the ultimate patent: in this kind of conflict, among inventors in good faith, spies, legal litigations and strategic moves, inevitably someone gets cut out. Maybe because he lives in a particularly secluded region, or because he is not wealthy like his opposers. Or simply because he, a hopeless idealist, is less interested in disputing than in research.

Innocenzo Manzetti’s figure belongs to the heterogeneous family of innovators, scientists and thinkers who, for these or other reasons, were confined to an undeserved oblivion, never to show up in history books. Yet his creativity and ingenuity were far from ordinary.

cache_1434810

Born in Aosta on March 17th 1826, Innocenzo was the fourth of eight siblings. Interested, since he was a kid, in physics ad mechanics, he got his diploma in surveying in Turin, and then settled back in his home town for good. Manzetti divided himself between his job at the civil engineering department, and his real passion: physics experiments on one hand, and on the other, designing and building mechanical devices.

The range of his interests was all-encompassing, and his fervid mind knew no repose. In 1849 he presented to the public his “flute player”: an iron and steel automaton, covered in suede, complete with porcelain eyes. The mechanical man was able to move his arms, take off his hat, talk, and perform up to twelve different melodies on his instrument. An astonishing result, which thanks to a municipal grant Manzetti was able to showcase at the London World’s Fair in 1851; but ultimately destined, like many of his inventions, to never achieve the hoped-for resonance.

cache_17300897

cache_17300898

His love for mechanical gear pushed him to build a flying automated parakeet, and a music box featuring an animated puppet. But beyond these brilliant inventions, which were meant to amaze the audience and show off his exceptional mechanical expertise, Manzetti also devised very useful, practical solutions: he developed a new hydrated lime, built a water pump which was used to drain the floodings in the Ollomont mines, but also a machine for making pasta, a filtering system for public drinking water, a pantograph with which he was able to etch a medallion with the image of Pope Pious IX on a grain of rice.

Excerpt from Manzetti’s pasta machine patent.

cache_1789372

3D reconstruction of the pasta amchine.

cache_1880520

3D reconstruction of the 3-seat velocipede.

cache_6123713

3D reconstruction of the steam-powered automobile.

Over the years, his fellow citizens learned to be amazed by the inventions of this eccentric character.
But it wasn’t until 1865 that Manzetti presented the two prototypes which could have granted him, on paper at least, fame and fortune: an automobile with an internal-combustion engine, the first steam-powered car with a functional steering system; and above all the “vocal telegraph”, true precursor of the telephone – six years before Antonio Meucci registered his idea in 1871, and eleven years ahead of Alexander Graham Bell‘s patent (1876).

If the legal battle over the paternity of the telephone between these last two inventors is well known, then why is Manzetti’s name so very seldom mentioned? Why didn’t this forerunner gain a prominent status in the history of telecommunications? And just how reliable are the rumors depicting him as a victim of a complex case of international espionnage?

There may be various causes condemning a scientist, albeit brilliant, to oblivion.
We decided to talk about it with one of the major experts in Manzetti’s life and work, Mauro Caniggia Nicolotti, who authored together with Luca Poggianti a series of biographies on the inventor from the Aosta Valley. Following is a transcription of the interesting conversation we had with Mauro.

Between the ‘800 and the ‘900, a series of extraordinary technological innovations took place, which in turn produced spectacular patent litigations – featuring many hits below the belt – to secure the rights of these revolutionary inventions: from radio to cinema, from the automobile to the telephone.
In fact, several scientists, physicists, engineers and inventors in different parts of the globe came to similar conclusions at the same time, and what proved most successful in the long run was not the novelty of the project itself, but rather a small improvement in respect to the versions proposed by the adversaries.
What was the atmosphere like in those times of great change? How was this turmoil perceived in Italy? Did the economic and cultural conditions of the Aosta Valley at the time play a part in Manzetti’s marginalization and bad luck?

I think what you said is true for every context in which an “invention” occurs. It is as if there were a thousand ideas floating in the sky, and somebody turns out to be the only one capable of grabbing the right ones.
Aosta Valley was very isolated. Just consider that major roads were built barely a century ago. Aosta at the time was known as a cul-de-sac, a dead end. Manzetti operated in this out-of-the-way context, which was quite rich culturally but not very technologically advanced. The first local newspapers were arising right then, and they were re-publishing news appearing on international papers; Manzetti absorbed every details about the inventions he read about in the news. He was like some sort of Gyro Gearloose, you know… in a word, a genius. In every field, not just plain science: he was a fine engraver, he was requested as a callygrapher in Switzerland, his interests were wide.
In his “workshop of wonders” he tried first of all to solve the problems of his own town, as for instance public lighting, or water supplying from the Buthier creek, which was particularly muddy, so he built filters for that… he tried to refine some solutions he learned from the papers, or he came up with original ideas. He absorbed, perfected, created.
So even in this limited context, Manzetti was an explosion of creativity. The local papers kept saying that he should have been living elsewhere for his genius to shine through, and the muncipal administration paid for his trip to the Exposition in London, so really, his talent was acknowledged, but for his entire life he was forced to operate with the poorest means.

Manzetti had undoubtedly a prolific mind: would his career have been different, had he cultivated a more entrepreneurial attitude? Was he well-integrated in the social fabric of his time? What did his fellow citizens think of him?

Certainly Manzetti was no entrepreneur. I think he really was a dreamer: although poor, he never went for the money. Instead he preferred to help out, so much so that he was elected to a post that today we would call “Commissioner of public works”. So yes, in a sense he was socially integrated.
Recently I discovered a vintage article (we weren’t able to include it in our new book) in which a traveller, describing the inhabitants of the Aosta Valley, used a derogatory term: he called them “hillbillies”, and wrote that they were ignorant and badly dressed. In this very article the author pointed out that, apart from the bishop who came from Ivrea (as the episcopal seat was vacant) and must have looked like an alien, the only other elegantly dressed citizen was Manzetti. So the feeling is that he was seen, maybe not really as a foreign body, but nevertheless as a person well above the average.

cache_1780662

cache_1783774

cache_1783773

In 1865 Innocenzo Manzetti presented his “vocal telegraph”, after envisioning it at the end of 1843 and having spent more than fifteen years in experiments and development. Some years before (1860-62) Johann Philipp Reis had demonstrated the use of his experimental phone, probably based on Charles Bourseul‘s research: this device however was meant as a prototype, useful for further studies, and was not entirely functional. How was Manzetti’s version different? I read that his telegraph had some flaws, especially in the output of consonants: is that true?

It’s true, in Manzetti’s first experiments of sound transmission the voice was not clear. You have to keep in mind that carbon filters were not available, along with every improvement that came along later on. His first attempt was done with makeshift gears, or at least with low-quality materials. Actually even inside his much celebrated automaton there were some low-quality pieces, so much so that it stopped working now and then.
The true problem is that the man who experimented the vocal telegraph with Manzetti was his friend, the canon Édouard Bérard: and Bérard was a perfectionist, even a bit fastidious.
That’s why he didn’t report just the news of sound transmission but, instead of giving in to the excitement of having been the first human being to hear a long-distance call, he felt the need to specify that the sound performance was “not clear”. Looking at it today, it sounds a little bit like complaining that the first plane ever built was able to fly “only” for some hundred meters.

Why didn’t Manzetti patent his invention?

He didn’t patent it for a number of reasons. Firstly, patents were extremely expensive and Manzetti couldn’t afford it. The only things he patented were the ones that could hopefully bring in a little money: the pasta machine, which is still under his patent today, and the hydrated lime which looked promising.
His telephone was immediately torn to shreds.
Between July and August 1864 Minister Matteucci visited Aosta Valley, and saw Manzetti’s telephone: so there must have been an unofficial presentation, a year before the public one. The Minister however openly confronted Manzetti, and his disapproval was expressed along these lines: “Are you crazy? We just united Italy, we faced revolutionary movements… the telegraph operator today is able to send a message, but at the same time to check its contents. A telephone call between two persons, without any mediator, without any control, could be dangerous for the government”. Even some newspapers in Florence skeptically asked who in the world could find such an invention to be useful: maybe young mushy lovers wishing one another goodnight? There was widespread criticism about him and his device, which would be of absolutely no use whatsoever.

Then again we have to remember that Manzetti himself had not a clear idea of all the developments his invention could entail: he thought of it simply as a way to make his automaton talk. So much so, that the first newspapers called the device “the Mouth”, because it was designed to fit into the automaton’s face. I don’t think he immediately understood what he had invented. His friends slowly made him realize that his device could be useful in a number of other ways.

cache_1781348

Letter by Innocenzo’s brother, describing the first experiments in 1843.

cache_1786758

cache_1786759

Alexander Graham Bell officially patented the telephone on February the 14th 1876. A year later, on March the 15th, Manzetti died in Aosta, forgotten and in poverty. And here the waters begin to get muddy, because the dispute between Bell and Meucci kicked off: did they both know Manzetti? According to your research, what are the elements suggesting a case of international espionnage? How reliable are they?

The battle over the paternity of the telephone consisted of two phases. The first one is all-Italian, in that Manzetti presented his “vocal telegraph” in 1865 (after his friends finally convinced him); the news travelled around the world, and in August it showed up in New York’s Italian-American newspaper L’eco d’Italia. Meucci was in NYC at the time, and he read the news. He replied with a series of articles in which he stated he invented something similar himself, and he described his device – which however was limited in respect to Manzetti’s, because instead of the handset it featured a conductor foil one had to keep between his teeth in order to transmit the words through vibrations. The articles ended with Meucci inviting Manzetti to collaborate. We don’t know whether Manzetti ever read this series of articles, so the question seemed closed until 1871, when Meucci deposited a caveat for his rudimental invention, which was not yet a proper telephone.

In a following moment, there was the litigation between Meucci and Bell. Bell frequented the same company with which Meucci deposited his invention, and strangely enough he patented his telephone in 1876, in the exact moment Meucci’s caveat expired. Then in the 1880’s a whole series of lawsuits followed, because precursors and inventors, real or alleged, sprang up like mushrooms. Once the dust settled, only Bell and Meucci were left to stand.

And then there was the issue of the “American intrigue”. The Aosta newspaper reported in 1865 that some English “mechanics” (i.e., scientists) came to Aosta to attend Manzetti’s presentation of his telegraph, maybe to figure out his secrets: according to some sources, among them was a young Bell, not yet renowned at the time, and Manzetti himself later said he still had Bell’s business card.
I would like to stress that we are not 100% sure that it really was Bell who travelled to Aosta in ’65, but the unpublished documents seem to confirm this hypothesis (and being private notes, there would have been no reason to lie about that).

But the real “scandal” happened later. On December the 19th 1879, a certain Horace H. Eldred, director of the telegraph society in NYC, met up with Bell: he was nominated President of Missouri Bell Telephone Company, and immediately took off to Europe. He arrived in Aosta on February the 6th, went to a notary together with Manzetti’s widow, and he acquired all the rights to the vocal telegraph: the deal was that he would appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States to recognize Manzetti as the true inventor of the telephone. He obviously did not tell the  grieving woman that he was one of Bell’s emissaries.
Perhaps Bell calculated that by buying exclusive rights from Manzetti, who was already thought to be the first inventor, he could keep in check all the others who were battling him.

Eldred took all the projects and everything with him.
But at some point I believe Eldred realized what he had just bought. He understood he held in his hands an improvement of the telephone, and thus he immediately came back to America, on April the 14th. In spite of Bell, he patented the device under his own name. A predictable litigation ensued, between him and Bell: Eldred won, opened a nice big factory on Front Street, New York, ran ads about his product, became vice-president of Telephones in the US and delegate in Europe. Eventually, he parted with Bell but went on to have a stunning career.

cache_17715870

manzetti_placca_1886

In your opinion, is Innocenzo Manzetti destined to remain in that crowded gallery of characters who showed prodigius talent – but were defeated right on the verge of glory – or will there be a late acknowledgement and a revival of his figure? Do you have some events planned for the anniversary?

We launched the “150th Forgotten Anniversary” with a small conference – but everyone here was busy with another recurrence, the first ascent on the Matterhorn (which was even celebrated with military aerobatics shows). Regarding Manzetti, there is no acknowledgement whatsoever; I intend to repeat the conference in July and August, but I already know the results will be even worse. Nobody cares, nor does the Administration. We had to fight for years just to have a tiny museum room, 6.5 by 7.5 meters wide, inside the sacristy of a church, where the automaton is on display along with some digital panels… nobody intends to believe in this.

Nemo propheta in patria, “nobody’s a prophet in his own country”: in the Aosta Valley, as long as there’s just me and Luca working on this, we will always be seen as visionaries. Maybe if some interest for Manzetti arose from the outside, then things could change — because when a voice comes from “outside the valley”, it is always taken more seriously. If only some English-speaking literature began to appear on the subject… but it takes time.
As far as I’m concerned, I count on being still present for the bicentenary, even if I will be almost a hundred years old. I will be a senile man, but I’ll be there!

cache_17300900

cache_17300903

cache_17300901

cache_17300905

cache_17300904

To further explore Manzetti’s life and inventions, and learn more details about the fascinating case of “American espionnage”, you can find a whole load of information at Manzetti’s Online Virtual Museum, curated by Mauro Caniggia Nicolotti e Luca Poggianti.

We also thank our reader Elena.

Madame Tutli-Putli

Una fragile giovane donna sale su un treno notturno, e fa la conoscenza degli strani e inquietanti personaggi che condividono il suo scompartimento: il viaggio si trasforma presto in un incubo lynchiano e surreale.

Questa la semplice trama del cortometraggio d’animazione Madame Tutli-Putli (2007) di Chris Lavis e Maciek Szczerbowski, prodotto dal National Film Board of Canada e vincitore di una serie di prestigiosi premi. Ma la vera forza del film sta in una particolare innovazione apportata alla risaputa tecnica della stop-motion: gli occhi dei personaggi sono infatti quelli di attori reali, girati dal vero e compositati in seguito sul volto dei pupazzi animati a passo uno. Basta questo a fare la differenza, perché gli occhi sono sempre il fulcro dell’emozione.

Il processo, lungo e laborioso, ha impiegato più di cinque anni di lavoro, eppure il frutto della fatica degli animatori è tutto sullo schermo: mai, prima di Madame Tutli-Putli, si erano visti dei pupazzi talmente vivi, espressivi e umani come quelli messi in scena dai registi canadesi.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGyLP6R4HTE]

Il sarto volante

brazil_1985_2

Fra tutti i sogni umani, quello del volo è stato per millenni il più grandioso e irraggiungibile. E affinché riuscissimo a staccarci dal suolo, e librarci al di sopra della terra a cui sembravamo condannati, sono stati necessari incalcolabili sacrifici, innumerevoli vite perdute nel tentativo testardo di liberarsi dalla forza di gravità. Questi individui coraggiosi e spavaldi, entusiasticamente proiettati verso il futuro, sperimentarono per primi macchine volanti non perfezionate, spesso con risultati catastrofici: uomini pronti a rischiare la pelle perché la posta in gioco travalicava i confini della loro singola esistenza. L’attrattiva di “scrivere la storia”, di cambiare l’uomo e allargare l’orizzonte delle sue possibilità è il motore stesso dell’esistenza, per gli appartenenti alla stirpe di Icaro.

Allo stesso tempo, c’era chi si industriava per rendere questi tentativi di volo più sicuri, progettando i primi sistemi di salvataggio. Nel 1910, a sette anni dal primo volo dei fratelli Wright, i pionieri ai comandi dei velivoli a motore rischiavano ancora grosso. In caso di incidente, non esisteva nessun tipo di paracadute perfettamente funzionante: era morte pressoché sicura.

Early_flight_02561u_(3)

Certo, l’idea esisteva già dalla fine del XVIII secolo, da quando Louis-Sébastien Lenormand (fisico e inventore) si era gettato con successo dalla torre dell’osservatorio di Montpellier utilizzando una specie di ombrellone costituito da un telaio in legno su cui era tesa della stoffa. Nel 1907 Charles Broadwick, esperto pilota di mongolfiere, mise a punto un prototipo del paracadute come lo conosciamo oggi: ripiegato in uno zaino, con tanto di corda statica per la sua apertura. Il 18 febbraio 1911, dalla Torre Eiffel venne lanciato un manichino che, grazie al paracadute di Broadwick, atterrò senza problemi.

FirstParachute

E qui entra in scena Franz Reichelt, il nostro eroe, viennese trapiantato in Francia. Reichelt non era né uno scienziato, né un provetto aviatore: era un semplice sarto. La sua boutique di abiti femminili al numero 8 di Rue Gaillon era piuttosto popolare fra le signore austriache che visitavano Parigi, ma a partire dal luglio del 1910 giacche e vestiti avevano lasciato il posto a un’altra, ben più nobile ossessione. Reichelt aveva deciso di iscrivere il suo nome negli annali del volo, sviluppando una tuta-paracadute, cioè un vestito che avrebbe contenuto già al suo interno il sistema di salvataggio.

Flying_tailor

I primi tentativi furono incoraggianti: Reichelt gettò ripetutamente dal suo balcone al quinto piano dei manichini che indossavano la sua tuta, ed ecco che, spiegando le ali, atterravano dolcemente al suolo. Ma quando fu il momento di convertire questo prototipo in una versione praticabile per l’uomo, il sarto incontrò diverse difficoltà. La tuta pesava ben 70 chili: forse proprio a causa di questo peso eccessivo, l’Aéro-Club di Francia giudicò la vela (cioè la calotta frenante) non abbastanza resistente, e si rifiutò di testare il suo progetto. I tecnici che lo valutarono provarono anche a dissuadere Reichelt dal proseguire le sue ricerche, ma il sarto non voleva sentire ragione.

Il 1911 fu un anno denso di frustrazioni: nonostante Reichelt continuasse a modificare il design della sua tuta, i manichini su cui conduceva i suoi lanci di prova finivano invariabilmente per fracassarsi al suolo. In un paio di occasioni il sarto provò in prima persona il suo paracadute, saltando da un’altezza di 8-10 metri: la prima volta lo salvò un covone di fieno, la seconda si ruppe una gamba.

La tuta, dopo costanti perfezionamenti, pesava ora 25 chili e la vela era stata ampliata da 6 m² a 12 m². Perché diamine, allora, continuava a non funzionare? Per Reichelt, le sue abilità di designer non erano in discussione: l’insuccesso doveva – per forza – essere imputabile alla scarsa altezza da cui erano stati eseguiti i test. A suo dire, cadendo da soli 10 metri, il vestito non aveva nemmeno il tempo di prendere contatto con l’aria; ci voleva un salto molto più vertiginoso.
A forza di solleciti e domande ufficiali, Reichelt riuscì infine ad ottenere l’autorizzazione di sperimentare il suo paracadute lanciando un manichino dalla prima piattaforma della Torre Eiffel. Ma il suo piano segreto era ben più spettacolare.

Francois Reichelt, before his fatal attempt, 1912

Nonostante l’esaltato e pomposo annuncio che Reichelt aveva fatto alla stampa qualche giorno prima, la mattina del 4 febbraio 1912 soltanto una trentina di persone si presentarono all’appuntamento. Di fronte a qualche personalità dell’aeronautica interessata alle questioni della sicurezza e agli scarsi giornalisti radunati sotto la Torre, Reichelt scese dalla macchina impettito, con addosso la sua tuta. La mostrò orgoglioso agli astanti: ormai era arrivato a diminuirne il peso fino a 9 chilogrammi, e l’apertura della vela era di ben 30 m². Tutti pensarono che l’inventore indossasse la sua creazione soltanto per illustrarne al meglio le caratteristiche; si accorsero però ben presto che Reichelt non aveva alcuna intenzione di utilizzare dei manichini, ma che voleva saltare lui stesso dalla piattaforma. Riporterà il quotidiano Le Gaulois: “Ci si stupì un po’ di non vedere il manichino annunciato […]. D’altronde, in materia di aviazione, non si è forse abituati a tutte le prodezze, a tutte le sorprese?”

Gli amici presenti cercarono di dissuaderlo, ma senza alcuna fortuna. “Voglio tentare io stesso l’esperimento, senza trucchi, per provare il valore della mia invenzione”, ripeteva. Di fronte alle pressanti obiezioni tecniche di un aeronauta esperto di sicurezza, Reichelt tagliò corto sorridendo: “Vedrete come i miei 62 chili e il mio paracadute daranno alle vostre critiche la più decisa delle smentite”. La fede dell’austriaco nella sua creazione era totale, incrollabile: con calma assoluta e buon umore, diede ordine affinché venisse delimitata e barricata, fra i quattro pilastri della torre, una zona sufficiente al suo atterraggio. Infine salì le scale fino alla piattaforma. Fotografi e operatori erano pronti a immortalare l’impresa eroica.

Alle 8:22 Reichelt montò su uno sgabello posto in cima ad un tavolo del ristorante; controllò l’equipaggiamento, lanciò in aria un pezzetto di carta per misurare la forza del vento. Fu preda allora di un inaspettato momento di esitazione. Rimase apparentemente indeciso per una quarantina di secondi: a cosa stava pensando?
Infine, con un ultimo sorriso, mise un piede sul parapetto e si gettò nel vuoto, a 57 metri dal suolo.

Il paracadute si attorcigliò immediatamente attorno al suo corpo, mentre precipitava, e la sua caduta libera durò una manciata di secondi. Reichelt si schiantò sul lastricato ghiacciato. Questa la descrizione del Figaro:

L’urto fu terribile; un colpo sordo, di una brutalità furiosa. All’impatto, il corpo rimbalzò e ricadde.
Ci si precipitò a soccorrerlo. La fronte insanguinata, gli occhi aperti, dilatati dal terrore, le membra spezzate. François Reichelt non dava più segni di vita.
Qualcuno si sporse, cercò di sentire il cuore. Era fermo.
Il temerario inventore era morto.
Allora la vittima, frantumata e disarticolata, venne sollevata; fu caricata su un autotaxi e il povero corpo fu trasportato a Laënnec.

La tragedia venne filmata da alcune cineprese. Ecco le immagini originali.

Oltre al danno, però, per Reichelt rimaneva ancora la beffa, ancorché postuma.
A sua insaputa, infatti, qualche mese prima era già andato a buon fine, oltreoceano, un salto da un aereo statunitense con paracadute senza telaio fisso; come non bastasse, in Russia Gleb Kotelnikov si era da poco assicurato il brevetto per il suo paracadute richiudibile, e il mese successivo l’avrebbe ottenuto anche per la Francia.

Mentre precipitava verso il selciato, il “sarto volante” non poteva sapere che la sua invenzione era già stata superata; dunque, se non altro, perì nella convinzione di aver tentato un’impresa inaudita.

Franz_Reichelt

E qui esce di scena Franz Reichelt, il nostro eroe, un po’ folle ma impavido e temerario – o almeno così sarebbe stato ricordato, se soltanto il suo congegno avesse funzionato. Il lancio di Reichelt produsse, all’impatto, un avvallamento di 15 centimetri d’altezza nell’asfalto; non lasciò purtroppo alcun segno nella storia dell’aviazione.

Doxology

Ecco a voi Doxology, un cortometraggio sperimentale diretto nel 2007 da Michael Langan. Delirante e assurdo gioiello di surrealismo e visioni allucinate, il corto utilizza la tecnica della pixillation, un tipo particolare di stop-motion in cui gli attori in carne ed ossa vengono “animati” a passo uno, fotogramma per fotogramma, come si farebbe con un pupazzo o un cartone animato.

Palline da tennis, danze con le automobili, misteriose riprese aeree che sembrano essere contemporaneamente fisse e in movimento… e questo titolo criptico, riferimento alla dossologia liturgica, che rimanda all’idea della ripetizione, e al concetto di sacro. Come se questo potesse essere il beffardo sguardo che Dio lancia verso l’uomo – uno sguardo ironico e incomprensibile, all’interno del quale tutto è fermo e allo stesso tempo in continua mutazione, e che vede l’essere umano come una piccola e buffa marionetta.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouEtqk3VIFM]

F.A.Q. – Tecniche di canto

Caro Bizzarro Bazar, seguo sempre “X-Factor” e “Amici”, perché il mio grande sogno è diventare un cantante. Potresti darmi qualche dritta?

Innanzitutto, ricorda che è fondamentale acquisire le basi. Comincia con l’acquisire la tecnica di canto più semplice e comune, illustrata in questo video.

Fondamentale, nel canto, è la respirazione. Allena il tuo naso in questo modo:

Importante poi è migliorare la memoria per ricordare sempre perfettamente il testo delle canzoni che canterai:

E, infine, anche l’occhio vuole la sua parte. Non dimenticare di vestirti in modo consono, raffinato ma casual, come il grande Franzl Lang in questo video.

 

Valerio Carrubba

Valerio Carrubba è nato nel 1975 a Siracusa. Le sue opere sono davvero uniche, e per più di una ragione.

Si tratta di dipinti surreali che ritraggono i soggetti sezionati e “aperti” come nelle tavole anatomiche, “cadaveri viventi” che espongono la propria natura fisica e l’interno dei corpi con iperrealismo di dettagli.

Ma la peculiare tecnica pittorica di Carrubba consiste nel dipingere ogni quadro due volte. Dapprima crea quello che molti degli spettatori più comuni definirebbero “il quadro vero”, vale a dire il disegno più definito, più pittorico, più dettagliato. Dopodiché l’artista vi dipinge sopra una seconda stesura, più “automatica”, che va a nascondere la versione precedente. Così facendo, crea un fantasma invisibile ai nostri occhi, nega e nasconde l’anima prima della sua opera, che rimane evidente solamente nella stratificazione dei colori (esaltata dall’utilizzo dell’acciaio inox come supporto).

“Ed è proprio la morte del “quadro vero”, ovvero sommamente, irrimediabilmente, ritualmente falso che Carrubba celebra; dipingendolo e poi, nella quiete del suo studio, uccidendolo e mostrandocene l’ectoplasma.” (Luigi Spagnol)

A simboleggiare questa morte del linguaggio espressivo, e la duplicità delle sue opere, i suoi quadri hanno tutti titoli palindromi (leggibili sia da destra che da sinistra).

Immortalità

La paura della morte è un processo psicologico riscontrabile in pressoché tutte le culture, ed è dovuto alla capacità del pensiero umano di figurarsi in future e passate situazioni, a trascendere il presente per visualizzare immagini differenti. La certezza della nostra dipartita deriva dall’osservazione della più basilare delle leggi naturali: il mondo è un continuo cambiare di forme, un aggregarsi e un disgregarsi senza tregua, e se siamo vivi lo dobbiamo al fatto che qualcun altro è morto. Quindi, sappiamo che siamo spacciati. Allacciamo la cintura di sicurezza ogni giorno, guardiamo bene prima di attraversare sulle strisce, facciamo check-up medici, ma in fondo sappiamo che prima o poi toccherà a noi. Secondo alcuni psicologi questo terrore è talmente paralizzante che la stessa cultura non sarebbe altro che uno stratagemma per sfuggire dalla paura della morte: un complesso sistema di produzione di senso, di modo che ci illudiamo di sapere cosa ci serve, cosa è importante, cosa si può fare e cosa no, quali sono le regole del successo, quali sono i valori e le tradizioni, chi siamo veramente –  un’imponente struttura simbolica in cui ognuno occupa una precisa posizione con doveri e diritti. Questo per combattere l’idea della morte, che annulla ogni senso e vanifica ogni nostro sforzo.

Dall’altro versante, la morte è stata combattuta concretamente e simbolicamente con le tecniche più disparate. Dagli elisir di lunga vita e la ricerca della pietra filosofale nell’alchimia classica, alle pratiche magiche e spirituali del Taoismo religioso, fino alla costruzione di mitologie che spostassero la vita oltre i limiti del corpo vero e proprio (il Nirvana, l’aldilà, la resurrezione Cristiana, ecc.) o che concedessero la consolazione di un’immortalità differita (raggiunta attraverso opere artistiche o dell’ingegno, attraverso la rilevanza storica acquisita dalla persona, attraverso l’atto di mettere al mondo dei figli per continuare a “vivere” nel loro ricordo, ecc.).

Oggi però anche la scienza tenta l’impossibile. Da trent’anni i ricercatori stanno studiando e mettendo a punto processi che rallentino l’invecchiamento. Ovviamente restare giovani non basterebbe, ma dovrebbe essere coadiuvato da ulteriori progressi medico-chirurgici per proteggerci da malattie e incidenti. Inoltre il quadro si complica se pensiamo alla densità di popolazione attuale – andrebbero risolti ovviamente anche i problemi relativi alle risorse energetiche. Da queste poche righe, è chiaro che stiamo parlando ancora di estrema fantascienza, nonostante l’ottimismo di alcuni ricercatori (vedi questo articolo).

A quanto ne sappiamo, in natura esiste un solo animale virtualmente immortale. Si tratta della turritopsis nutricula, un tipo di idrozoo della famiglia Oceanidae. Questa medusa è l’unico animale in grado di invertire il proprio orologio biologico: dopo aver raggiunto la maturità sessuale, la t. nutricula è capace di ritornare allo stadio immaturo, e regredire allo stato di polipo. Un po’ come una farfalla che si tramutasse in bruco, insomma. Questa sorprendente trasformazione è possibile grazie a un processo chiamato transdifferenziazione, in cui un tipo di cellula altera il proprio corredo genetico e diviene un altro tipo di cellula. Altri animali sono capaci di limitate transdifferenziazioni (ad alcune salamandre possono crescere nuovi arti), ma soltanto la t. nutricula rigenera il suo corpo tutto intero. Il processo teoricamente potrebbe essere ripetuto all’infinito, se non fosse che le meduse sono soggette agli stessi pericoli degli altri animali e poche di loro arrivano ad avere l’opportunità di ritornare polipi, prima di finire sul menu di qualche pesce più grosso. Ma, chi lo sa? forse proprio questa minuscola medusa svelerà agli scienziati il segreto per invertire l’invecchiamento.

Il progresso tecnologico avanza a passi da gigante. La scienza si sta già avvicinando alla produzione di organi di ricambio, la ricerca su clonazione, staminali e nanotecnologie applicate alla medicina promette di cambiare il modo in cui pensiamo al futuro. L’idea che non noi, non i nostri figli, ma magari i nostri lontani pronipoti potrebbero avere accesso a vite, se non eterne, lunghe qualche centinaio di anni, stimola la fantasia e pone inediti problemi morali e filosofici. Certamente molti lettori, stando al gioco della speculazione fantascientifica, si domanderanno: ne vale davvero la pena? Chi vorrebbe vivere così a lungo? Non sarebbe forse meglio trovare un modo per imparare a morire serenamente, piuttosto che imparare a vivere in eterno? Altri penseranno invece che, se c’è questa possibilità, perché non provare?

Se qualcuno fosse curioso di approfondire il discorso, questo libro di E. Boncinelli e G. Sciarretta traccia il sogno dell’immortalità dalle origini mitologiche fino alla scienza moderna; il bellissimo documentario Flight From Death – The Quest for Immortality analizza invece la psicologia della morte, la creazione della cultura come schermo protettivo, e l’accettazione del nostro destino finale.

In chiusura, proponiamo come spunto di riflessione la splendida incoscienza (e l’intuitiva saggezza) di una delle più belle fiabe, il capolavoro di James M. Barrie Le Avventure di Peter Pan: “Morire sarà una grande meravigliosa avventura.”

Auto trapanazione

Fino a dove sareste disposti ad arrivare, pur di “ampliare la vostra coscienza”? Potreste scegliere la strada più lunga, la meditazione, lo yoga, lo zazen e via dicendo. Oppure potreste decidere di prendere la “scorciatoia” delle sostanze psicoattive, e cercare di “liberare la mente” attraverso lo yage o i funghetti mescalinici, o l’acido lisergico. Ma arrivereste mai al punto di prendere il vostro fido trapano Black&Decker a percussione, puntarvelo alla fronte e praticare un bel foro nel cranio, dal quale si possa vedere la dura mater che ricopre il cervello?

La trapanazione è stata praticata fin dal Neolitico. Era una pratica relativamente comune, con la quale si cercava di far “uscire” gli spiriti maligni dalla testa del malato. Secondo alcune interpretazioni dei dipinti rupestri, pare che i nostri antenati fossero convinti che praticare un foro nel cranio potesse curare da emicranie, epilessia o disordini mentali. L’intervento, popolare nelle aree germaniche durante il Medio Evo, sembra inoltre aver avuto un’alta percentuale di sopravvivenza – a giudicare dai bordi soffici dei fori sui teschi ritrovati, le ferite stavano cominciando a guarire:  sette persone su otto si riprendevano dall’operazione.

Flashforward al 1964. I tre protagonisti di questa storia si chiamano Bart, Amanda e Joseph.

Bart Huges, un giovane olandese che non aveva mai potuto finire gli studi di medicina per via del suo uso di stupefacenti, pubblica un incartamento underground intitolato Il meccanismo del Volume del Sangue al Cervello, conosciuto anche come Homo Sapiens Correctus. In questo piccolo, psichedelico saggio Huges parla di come il cervello del bambino sia così ricettivo perché le ossa del cranio sono elastiche e la fontanella alla cima della testa permette al cervello di “respirare”, ossia di sostenere la pressione del sangue proveniente dal cuore con una sua propria “pulsazione”. Crescendo, però, la fontanella si salda e le ossa si solidificano. Il nostro cervello rimane così rinchiuso in una vera e propria prigione. Praticando un foro nel cranio, si allenta la pressione del cervello e lo si libera, dandogli uno sfogo per “respirare” e rendendo possibile una sorta di sballo permanente, oltre che un ampliamento della coscienza senza precedenti. Bart Huges praticò su se stesso la trapanazione, l’anno successivo, nel 1965. L’operazione durò 45 minuti, ma per togliere il sangue dai muri occorsero 4 ore.

Con le sue bende che coprivano l’impressionante foro, praticato all’altezza del terzo occhio, Bart Huges divenne il guru della trapanazione, auspicando che tutti gli ospedali la praticassero gratuitamente, e arrivando a opinare che in un futuro non troppo lontano il buco in testa venisse praticato a tutti, a una certa età, per creare un’umanità evoluta e sensitiva.

Ora, penserete, in un mondo normale nessuno darebbe credito a un guru di questo tipo, e soprattutto alle sue fantasticherie pseudoscientifiche. Ma questo non è un mondo normale, e men che meno lo era quello dei favolosi Sixties, in cui la liberazione della mente era uno degli scopi principali dell’esistenza, assieme al libero amore e alla musica rock. Huges cominciò con il farsi un adepto, Joseph Mellen, un hippie piuttosto fatto che però ebbe il merito di fargli conoscere Amanda Feilding. Fra i due scoccò subito la scintilla della passione. Bart e Amanda convinsero il povero Joseph a trapanarsi – ma se Bart aveva usato un trapano elettrico, Joseph avrebbe dovuto usare un trapano a mano, “per convincere le autorità che anche le popolazioni del terzo mondo avrebbero potuto godere della tecnica”. Joseph, che aveva forse poca personalità ma di certo molta buona volontà, provò a bucarsi la testa con quel trapano, senza riuscirvi, forse anche a causa della quantità impressionante di LSD che si era calato per “calmare i nervi”.

Mellen ci riprovò per altre quattro volte, nell’arco dei quattro anni successivi, talvolta assistito da Amanda (che aveva nel frattempo lasciato Bart, e si era sposata con lui). Una volta, ancora strafatto di LSD, si era trapanato fino a svenire ed essere ricoverato d’urgenza. Un’altra volta aveva sentito “un sacco di bolle corrermi dentro la testa”, ma visto che l’estasi prevista non arrivava, aveva concluso che  il buco praticato doveva per forza essere troppo piccolo. Un’altra volta si ruppe il trapano, Joseph dovette interrompere l’operazione a metà, andare a chiedere a un vicino di riparargli l’utensile, e poi riprendere il “lavoro”. Infine, dopo tanti tentativi tragicomici, Mellen riuscì ad ottenere il suo bel buco, e il più grande e potente sballo della sua vita (a suo dire). Amanda, imparando dagli errori del marito, decise tre mesi dopo di tentare anche lei.

Filmata da Joseph, la sua fu un’operazione sopraffina, e divenne ben presto un filmato d’arte underground che ancora oggi pochi hanno avuto la fortuna (?) di vedere: Heartbeat In The Brain (1970). Il filmato, esplicito e duro, ebbe una certa eco negli ambienti artistici nei quali la Feilding era conosciuta.

Amanda Feilding è sempre stata più ambigua sul risultato della sua auto trapanazione; ha continuato a sostenerne gli effetti benefici con strenua convinzione, ma ha anche spesso sottolineato la “soggettività” delle sue posizioni. (A onor del vero, bisogna sottolineare che nessuno di questi ferventi fautori della trapanazione ha mai sostenuto l’auto trapanazione: vi sono arrivati dopo che nessun chirurgo si era prestato a soddisfare le loro richieste).

Dopo vent’otto anni assieme e due figli, Mellen e Fielding si separarono. Risposati, ognuno di loro convinse il rispettivo nuovo coniuge a farsi trapanare. In tutto, le persone trapanate al mondo dovrebbero essere circa una ventina. Fino a qualche anno fa era attiva anche una Church Of Trepanation, con sede in Messico, che proponeva per un modico prezzo una trapanazione operata da un chirurgo messicano compiacente. Oggi si è trasformata in un più sobrio Gruppo per la Trapanazione, con un sito ad appoggio delle teorie in favore di questa pratica.

Per saperne di più:

Trapanazione su Wikipedia (inglese) – Intervista-racconto ad Amanda Feilding – il documentario A Hole in The Head