Visitors From The Future

This article was originally published on #ILLUSTRATI n. 42, Visitors.

If we had the opportunity to communicate through time with humans of year 8113, would we be able to understand each other?
Supposing that every trace of our current civilisation had been erased, how could we explain our present to these remote descendants, these true aliens?

In 1936 this question arose in the mind of Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, the then director of the Oglethorpe University in Georgia, and lead to his decision to create a compendium of the human knowledge acquired by that time. What’s more, he thought it would have been better to show to the future men and women a wide range of significant objects that could convey a clear idea of the customs and traditions of the XX century.
It wasn’t an easy matter. Let’s think about it: what object would you include in your virtual museum if you had to summarise the entire history of the human race?

With the help of Thomas K. Peters, photographer, film producer and inventor, Dr Jacobs spent three years building his collection. As time passed by, the list of objects got more and more impressive and it included some unexpected items, which clearly the two curators reckoned that the humans of the Ninth millennium needed to see.

Among others, the collection contained 600.000 pages of text on microfilm, 200 narrative books, drawings of the greatest human inventions, a list of sports and hobbies which were fashionable during the past century, film showing historical events and audio recordings of the speeches of Hitler, Mussolini, Roosevelt and Stalin. And again: air shots of the main cities of the world, eyeglasses, dental plates, artificial limbs, navigation instruments, flower and plant seeds, clothes, typewriters… up to Budweiser beers, aluminium foil, Vaseline, nylons and plastic toys.

The two men then patiently sealed that huge pile of objects in hermetic recipients made of steel and glass, filling some capsules with nitrogen, in order to prevent the material oxidation. At last, they collocated the “museum”, exhibiting six millenniums of human knowledge, in a crypt under the Phoebe Hearst Memorial Hall. They did not forget to place a machinery called Language Integrator in front of the entrance: a tool that can teach how to speak English to the future historians, in case the Shakespeare language would not be at its bests any more.

The chamber was officially sealed on the 25th of May 1940. The plate affixed to the enormous stainless door specified that its insides did not contain any gold or jewelleries. Better safe than sorry.

This strange and restricted museum is still present and, if everything goes as planned, will remain untouched until year 8113, as indicated on the inscription. Yes, but why this specific year?
Dr. Jacobs considered the year 1936 as the bookmark on a hypothetical timeline, then added 6.177 years, corresponding to the amount of time passed from the establishment of the Egyptian Calendar (4241 B.C.).

The Oglethorpe University experience was regarded as the first “time capsule” of human history. The idea obtained a huge resonance and was followed by many other attempts of preserving the human knowledge and identity for future generations, by burying similar collections of memories and information.

Will the homo sapiens be still around in 8113? What will he look like? Would he be interested in discovering how we lived during the 40s of the XX century?
Beside the sci-fi (utopic or dystopic) visions of the future evoked by the time capsules, their charm resides in what they can tell about the past. An optimistic time, permeated by a blind trust in the human progress and still unscratched by the Second world war disaster, the holocausts and the nuclear horrors, an era unaware of the countless tragedies to come. A time when it was still possible to fiercely believe that future generations would have looked up to us with respect and curiosity.

Nowadays it is impossible to conceive in human terms such a distant future. The technology in our hands is already transforming us, our species, in ways that were unthinkable just a few decades ago. Our impact on the ecological and social system has already reached unprecedented levels.
Therefore, should we picture a “visitor” from year 8113 anyway… it is reasonable to presume that looking at us, his long-lost ancestors, he would shiver in disgust.

(Thanks, Masdeca!)

Four-legged Espionage

The cat does not offer services. The cat offers itself.
(William S. Burroughs, The Cat Inside, 1986)

Today, after Wikileaks and Snowden, we are used to think of espionage as cyberwarfare: communication hacking, trojans and metadata tracking, attacks to foreign routers, surveillance drones, advanced software, and so on.
In the Sixties, in the middle of the Cold War, the only way to intercept enemy conversations was to physically bug their headquarters.

The problem, of course, was that all factions listend, and knew they were listened to. No agent would talk top secret matters inside a state building hall. The safest method was still the one we’ve seen in many films — if you wanted to discuss in all tranquillity, you had to go outside.
It was therefore essential, for all intelligence systems, to find an appropriate countermeasure: but how could they eavesdrop a conversation out in the open, without arousing suspicion?

In 1961 someone at CIA Directorate of Science and Technology had a flash of inspiration.
There was only one thing the enemy spies would not pay attention to, in the midst of a classified conversation: a cat passing by.
In the hope of achieving the spying breakthrough of the century, CIA launched a secret program called “Acoustic Kitty”. Goal of the project: to build cybercats equipped with surveillance systems, train them to spy, and to infiltrate them inside the Kremlin.

After all, as Terry Pratchett put it, “it is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you’re attempting can’t be done“.

After the first years of theoretical studies, researchers proceeded to test them in vivo.
They implanted a microphone inside a cat’s earing canal, a transmitter with power supply, and an antenna extending towards the animal’s tail. According to the testimony of former CIA official Victor Marchetti, “they slit the cat open, put batteries in him, wired him up. They made a monstrosity“. A monstrosity which nonetheless could allow them to record everything the kitty was hearing.

But there was another, not-so-secondary issue to deal with. The furry incognito agent would have to reach the sensible target without getting distracted along its way — not even by an untimely, proverbial little mouse. And everybody knows training a cat is a tough endeavour.

Some experiments were conducted in order to guide the cat from a distance, basicially to operate it by remote control through electrical impulses (remember José Delgado?). This proved to be harder than expected, and tests followed one antoher with no substantial results. The felines could be “trained to move short distances“; hardly an extraordinary success, even if researchers tried to make it look like a “remarkable scientific achievement“.
Eventually, having lost their patience, or maybe hoping for some unexpected miracle, the agents decided to run some empirical field test. They sent the cat on its first true mission.

On a bright morning in 1966, two Soviet officials were sitting on a park bench on Wisconsin Avenue, right outside the Washington Embassy of Russia, unaware of being targeted for one of the most absurd espionage operations ever.
In a nearby street, history’s first 007 cat was released from an anonymous van.
Now imagine several CIA agents, inside the vehicle, all wearing headphone and receivers, anxiously waiting. After years of laboratory studies, the moment of truth had come at last: would it work? Would they succeed in piloting the cat towards the target? Would the kitty obediently eavesdrop the conversation between the two men?

Their excitement, alas, was short lived.

After less than 10 feet, the Acoustic Kitty was run over by a taxi.
RIP Acoustic Kitty.

With this inglorious accident, after six years of pioneering research which cost 20 million dollars, project Acoustic Kitten was declared a total failure and abandoned.
One March 1967 report, declassified in 2001, stated that “the environmental and security factors in using this technique in a real foreign situation force us to conclude that […] it would not be practical“.

One last note: the story of the cat being hit by a taxi was told by the already mentioned Victor Marchetti; in 2013 Robert Wallace, former director of the Office of Technical Service, disputed the story, asserting that the animal simply did not do what the researchers wanted. “The equipment was taken out of the cat; the cat was re-sewn for a second time, and lived a long and happy life afterwards“.

You can choose your favorite ending.

Living Machines: Automata Between Nature and Artifice

Article by Laura Tradii
University of Oxford,
MSc History of Science, Medicine and Technology

In a rather unknown operetta morale, the great Leopardi imagines an award competition organised by the fictitious Academy of Syllographers. Being the 19th Century the “Age of Machines”, and despairing of the possibility of improving mankind, the Academy will reward the inventors of three automata, described in a paroxysm of bitter irony: the first will have to be a machine able to act like a trusted friend, ready to assist his acquaintances in the moment of need, and refraining from speaking behind their back; the second machine will be a “steam-powered artificial man” programmed to accomplish virtuous deeds, while the third will be a faithful woman. Considering the great variety of automata built in his century, Leopardi points out, such achievements should not be considered impossible.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century, automata (from the Greek, “self moving” or “acting of itself”) had become a real craze in Europe, above all in aristocratic circles. Already a few centuries earlier, hydraulic automata had often been installed in the gardens of palaces to amuse the visitors. Jessica Riskin, author of several works on automata and their history, describes thus the machines which could be found, in the fourteenth and fifteenth century, in the French castle of Hesdin:

“3 personnages that spout water and wet people at will”; a “machine for wetting ladies when they step on it”; an “engien [sic] which, when its knobs are touched, strikes in the face those who are underneath and covers them with black or white [flour or coal dust]”.1

26768908656_4aa6fd60f9_o

26768900716_9e86ee1ded_o

In the fifteenth century, always according to Riskin, Boxley Abbey in Kent displayed a mechanical Jesus which could be moved by pulling some strings. The Jesus muttered, blinked, moved his hands and feet, nodded, and he could smile and frown. In this period, the fact that automata required a human to operate them, instead of moving of their own accord as suggested by the etymology, was not seen as cheating, but rather as a necessity.2

In the eighteenth century, instead, mechanics and engineers attempted to create automata which could move of their own accord once loaded, and this change could be contextualised in a time in which mechanistic theories of nature had been put forward. According to such theories, nature could be understood in fundamentally mechanical terms, like a great clockwork whose dynamics and processes were not much different from the ones of a machine. According to Descartes, for example, a single mechanical philosophy could explain the actions of both living beings and natural phenomena.3
Inventors attempted therefore to understand and artificially recreate the movements of animals and human beings, and the mechanical duck built by Vaucanson is a perfect example of such attempts.

With this automaton, Vaucanson purposed to replicate the physical process of digestion: the duck would eat seeds, digest them, and defecate. In truth, the automaton simply simulated these processes, and the faeces were prepared in advance. The silver swan built by John Joseph Merlin (1735-1803), instead, imitated with an astonishing realism the movements of the animal, which moved (and still moves) his neck with surprising flexibility. Through thin glass tubes, Merlin even managed to recreate the reflection of the water on which the swan seemed to float.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT05uNFb6hY

Vaucanson’s Flute Player, instead, played a real flute, blowing air into the instruments thanks to mechanical lungs, and moving his fingers. On a similar vein, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a little model of Napoleon was displayed in the United Kingdom: the puppet breathed, and it was covered in a material which imitated the texture of skin.  The advertisement for its exhibition at the Dublin’s Royal Arcade described it as a ‘splendid Work of Art’, ‘produc[ing] a striking imitation of human nature, in its Form, Color, and Texture, animated with the act of Respiration, Flexibility of the Limbs, and Elasticity of Flesh, as to induce a belief that this pleasing and really wonderful Figure is a living subject, ready to get up and speak’.4

The attempt to artificially recreate natural processes included other functions beyond movement. In 1779, the Academy of Sciences of Saint Petersburg opened a competition to mechanise the most human of all faculties, language, rewarding who would have succeeded in building a machine capable of pronouncing vowels. A decade later, Kempelen, the inventor of the famous Chess-Playing Turk, built a machine which could pronounce 19 consonants (at least according to Kempelen himself).5

In virtue of their uncanny nature, automata embody the tension between artifice and nature which for centuries has animated Western thought. The quest not only for the manipulation, but for the perfecting of the natural order, typical of the Wunderkammer or the alchemical laboratory, finds expression in the automaton, and it is this presumption that Leopardi comments with sarcasm. For Leopardi, like for some of his contemporaries, the idea that human beings could enhance what Nature already created perfect is a pernicious misconception. The traditional narrative of progress, according to which the lives of humans can be improved through technology, which separates mankind from the cruel state of nature, is challenged by Leopardi through his satire of automata. With his proverbial optimism, the author believes that all that distances humans from Nature can only be the cause of suffering, and that no improvement in the human condition shall be achieved through mechanisation and modernisation.

This criticism is substantiated by the fear that humans may become victims of their own creation, a discourse which was widespread during the Industrial Revolution. Romantic writer Jean Paul (1763-1825), for example, uses automata to satirise the society of the late eighteenth century, imagining a dystopic world in which machines are used to control the citizens and to carry out even the most trivial tasks: to chew food, to play music, and even to pray.6

The mechanical metaphors which were often used in the seventeenth century to describe the functioning of the State, conceptualised as a machine formed of different cogs or institutions, acquire here a dystopic connotation, becoming the manifestation of a bureaucratic, mechanical, and therefore dehumanising order. It is interesting to see how observations of this kind recur today in debates over Artificial Intelligence, and how, quoting Leopardi, a future is envisioned in which “the uses of machines [will come to] include not only material things, but also spiritual ones”.

A closer future than we may think, since technology modifies in entirely new directions our way of life, our understanding of ourselves, and our position in the natural order.

____________

[1]  Jessica Riskin, Frolicsome Engines: The Long Prehistory of Artificial Intelligence.
[2]  Grafton, The Devil as Automaton: Giovanni Fontana and the Meanings of a Fifteenth-Century Machine, p.56.
[3]  Grafton, p.58.
[4]  Jennifer Walls, Captivating Respiration: the “Breathing Napoleon”.
[5]  John P. Cater, Electronically Speaking: Computer Speech Generation, Howard M. Sams & Co., 1983, pp. 72-74.
[6]  Jean Paul, 1789. Discusso in Sublime Dreams of Living Machines: the Automaton in the European Imagination di Minsoo Kang.

Speciale: Mariano Tomatis

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ama l’appellativo di wonder injector, istillatore di meraviglia o “tecnico dello stupore”. Quello che comincia come un rapido giro sul suo sito o sul suo blog si trasforma inevitabilmente in un viaggio di diverse ore, in preda ad una vertigine crescente. È difficile raccontare o definire Mariano Tomatis, ed è bello che lo sia.

Mariano si occupa di illusionismo, magia, matematica, criminologia e tecnologia. Ma, qualsiasi campo stia affrontando, lo fa inevitabilmente da un punto di vista inaspettato. Il suo lavoro è tutto proteso a un nuovo modo di relazionarsi con la meraviglia, a farla irrompere nel nostro quotidiano superando i modi triti e ritriti di quei misteri che in queste pagine abbiamo spesso definito “da supermarket”, preconfezionati, tipici di tanti libri o trasmissioni televisive.

Mariano Tomatis è il tipo di persona che, leggendo uno strano trattato esoterico seicentesco contenente alcune tavole crittografate secondo un sistema complicatissimo, si domanda: che tipo di computer avranno usato per codificarlo, all’epoca? E lo costruisce.

20130322m

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

20130322f

20130322g
È anche il tipo di persona che, vedendo l’ennesimo numero di magia in cui una bella ragazza viene tagliata a metà, sa scorgerne le implicazioni sessiste e non esita a raccontarci come un numero simile sia nato sorprendentemente proprio da problematiche politiche legati agli albori dei diritti della donna (in questo breve documentario).

20130526f

20130526h
O, ancora, esaminando uno dei quadri più celebri della storia dell’arte ci racconta le infinite risme di ipotesi, sempre più fantascientifiche, che il dipinto ha originato… per poi gelarci con un’interpretazione molto più semplice e illuminante.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jvE_hcbxrM]

La performance che ha scritto assieme a Ferdinando Buscema ha aperto Ingenuity, una sontuosa celebrazione dell’intelligenza, della curiosità e della meraviglia che ha coinvolto scienziati, artisti, scrittori, designer, musicisti e maghi provenienti da tutto il mondo, organizzata da BoingBoing, uno dei siti di informazione geek e cyberpunk più letti al mondo. Potete vedere la performance qui.

20130814c

Oltre ad aver scritto libri sul mentalismo, sui numeri e sull’illusionismo, Mariano ci regala continuamente nuovi stimoli, riportando storie curiose e poco note che affronta con scrupolo, determinato com’è a “illuminare le meraviglie sul confine tra Scienza e Mistero”.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar, ecco la nostra intervista a Mariano Tomatis.

Qual è la tua formazione?

Ho una laurea in Informatica e mi occupo di illusionismo da quindici anni.

Come hai incominciato ad appassionarti di illusionismo, misteri e scienza?

Recentemente ho ritrovato un tema scritto quando facevo le elementari, in cui mi ripromettevo – quando fossi stato “grande” – di fare luce sui principali misteri: dal mostro di Lochness al triangolo delle Bermude, fino alla perduta città di Atlantide. Ho incontrato l’illusionismo ammirando il mago Silvan e formandomi sulle sue scatole magiche. Vivendo a Torino, ho avuto la fortuna di scoprire e frequentare il Circolo Amici della Magia, dove l’arte magica è particolarmente valorizzata. Da qualche anno, insieme a Ferdinando Buscema, stiamo definendo il concetto di “magic experience design” – un approccio all’illusionismo che trascende il contesto teatrale e interviene sulla realtà, facendo succedere eventi magici nel quotidiano.

Il tuo approccio ai cosiddetti “misteri” (quello di Rennes-le-Château viene in mente per primo) è del tutto originale – ironico, scettico, e allo stesso tempo entusiasta: come concili queste tendenze? Si può dire che tu stia sfruttando il fascino di questi enigmi per parlarci in realtà di qualcos’altro?

Conciliare una consapevolezza razionale e un’immersione ingenua nei misteri potrebbe sembrare il tentativo di avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca, eppure si tratta di un equilibrio su cui molti autori hanno scritto pagine brillanti. Michael Saler lo chiama “incanto disincantato”. Joshua Landy parla di “sistemi di credenze consapevoli della propria illusorietà”. Orhan Pamuk confessa di scrivere romanzi la cui funzione principale è quella di coltivare tale capacità nel lettore. Il padre della prestigiazione moderna, Robert-Houdin, costruiva i suoi spettacoli in modo da premiare un atteggiamento di distaccata credulità. Con Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle ha creato un personaggio talmente verosimile che oggi i suoi fan continuano a visitare la sua casa in Baker Street a Londra, del tutto consapevoli di partecipare a un gioco. Coltivare nel lettore moderno questo atteggiamento è una scelta estetica a cui aderisco pienamente.
Nel dichiarare i suoi intenti, il Cicap afferma di usare il fascino dei misteri per spiegare la Scienza. Nel mio caso, spiegare la Scienza è solo un effetto collaterale: il mio intento è quello di contribuire al re-incantamento del mondo, e credo che il miglior modo di farlo sia l’educazione all’incanto disincantato.

In diversi tuoi lavori si avverte una particolare vertigine, che è quella di non poter esattamente sapere a che punto finiscono i fatti, e quando incomincia il “trucco”. Anche qui ho la sensazione che mischiare realtà e finzione sia, certamente, un gioco divertente; ma al tempo stesso, vista la sistematicità con cui lo utilizzi, che vi sia dietro un progetto più preciso.

Credo di averti risposto sopra. Per citare un altro dei miei autori più amati, Lovecraft mescolò in modi raffinati realtà e finzione, producendo potenti sensazioni di straniamento attraverso i suoi racconti. Nel suo Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy Graham Harman ne esplora le tecniche narrative con una notevole ampiezza di analisi. Leggendo Harman, oggi mi chiedo come Lovecraft avrebbe sfruttato Twitter, Facebook e YouTube per produrre le stesse sensazioni disturbanti. Accostare personaggi di epoche lontane alle moderne tecnologie offre straordinari spunti creativi. Se c’è un progetto dietro la sistematicità con cui lavoro su questi confini, esso riguarda la possibilità di portare alla luce modi per meravigliare sempre nuovi, più profondi e al passo coi tempi. E magari di ispirare un Lovecraft 2.0!

Lovecraft-Facebook
Il mentalismo è intrigante soprattutto in quanto smaschera le trappole del nostro pensiero. Si può dire che vi sia un utilizzo “sano” del mistero e della meraviglia, e un altro invece “pericoloso”?

Michael Saler identifica nell’ironia l’elemento che è alla base della meraviglia “sana”. Inganno (e autoinganno) diventano pericolosi dove non c’è consapevolezza ironica, ma aperta volontà di approfittare di un altro individuo. Dovremmo sempre tenere in mente le parole di Joseph Pulitzer: «Non esiste delitto, inganno, trucco, imbroglio e vizio che non vivano della loro segretezza. Portate alla luce del giorno questi segreti, descriveteli, rendeteli ridicoli agli occhi di tutti e prima o poi la pubblica opinione li getterà via. La sola divulgazione di per sé non è forse sufficiente, ma è l’unico mezzo senza il quale falliscono tutti gli altri».

Hai parlato di educazione alla complessità: come sta cambiando, o come deve secondo te cambiare, la magia nell’era tecnologica, non soltanto a livello di nuovi strumenti ma anche di portata etica?

La mentalità postmoderna deve contaminare l’illusionismo molto più di quanto abbia fatto finora. È ora che i prestigiatori si interroghino seriamente sul ruolo che possono avere le loro storie nel mondo contemporaneo. Terence McKenna diceva che «il vero segreto della magia è che il mondo è fatto di parole, e che se tu conosci le parole di cui il mondo è fatto puoi farne quello che vuoi». Anche se sembra una considerazione esoterica, è un’immagine precisa del potere che hanno le storie nel plasmare la realtà. Concordo con Wu Ming 4 quando scrive che “le narrazioni ci appartengono almeno quanto noi apparteniamo a esse. Noi interagiamo con le narrazioni allo stesso modo in cui interagiamo con il mondo che ci circonda, consapevoli che per cambiarlo abbiamo innanzi tutto bisogno di raccontarlo diversamente”. Credo che l’illusionismo, come la letteratura militante, possa avere una dimensione marziale – e che tale forza sia ampiamente da esplorare. Il mio documentario Donne a metà (2013) va in quella direzione. Penn&Teller sono la coppia di illusionisti più all’avanguardia su questo versante.

magic-and-the-brain_1

Da specialista dell’incanto per il tuo pubblico, c’è qualcosa oggi che riesce ad incantare te?

Continuamente. Aderisco totalmente alla metafora che David Pescovitz usò per rispondere alla domanda della rivista Edge “Che cosa ti rende ottimista?” L’editor del blog BoingBoing scrisse di essere ottimista perché il mondo è una gigantesca Wunderkammer, pronta a stupirci a ogni angolo.
Un blog come il tuo ha il grande valore di dimostrarlo quotidianamente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13tSEyOqGs]

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Mariano Tomatis.

Andy Paiko

paiko-portrait

Andy Paiko è un artista nato nel 1977 in California, anche se oggi il suo laboratorio si trova a Portland, nell’Oregon. Il materiale con cui lavora è il vetro; ma probabilmente, di fronte alle sue opere, perfino il più esperto maestro vetraio di Murano non potrebbe impedirsi di rimanere meravigliato.

Per lui, quand’era un giovane studente d’arte, l’incontro con il vetro avvenne quasi per caso; dopo aver raggiunto una discreta esperienza, mostrò con orgoglio i recipienti e i bicchieri che aveva prodotto al suo insegnante, che però invece di lodare la sua tecnica gli rivolse una semplice domanda: “Credi davvero che il mondo abbia bisogno di altri vasi?”.

Fu così che Paiko cominciò a cercare una propria voce, un modo esclusivamente suo di utilizzare questo materiale duttile e affascinante. Il vetro sarebbe diventato il mezzo per esprimere il suo mondo interiore.

andy-paiko-glass-syringe

andy-paiko-glass-3

andy-paiko-dandelions

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Appassionato di storia della scienza e della tecnica, Andy oggi persegue un inedito connubio fra queste materie e la ialurgia: un suo celebre pezzo è un sismografo funzionante, quasi interamente costituito di vetro. Per costruire un arcolaio, composto da centinaia di parti singole, Paiko ne ha studiato per mesi i componenti e la struttura. Fra i suoi prossimi progetti, la costruzione di una bicicletta in vetro su cui si possa pedalare davvero.

3

paiko03

Paiko3w-1024x766

PP_3
Un altro interesse di Paiko è la tassonomia, e diverse opere testimoniano il suo amore per la catalogazione; eppure, vedendo il risultato dei suoi lavori che includono parti organiche, non si può non pensare che si tratti anche di un elaborato omaggio ai resti animali e vegetali esposti, una sorta di etereo mausoleo che ne valorizza e sottolinea, con la sua bellezza raffinata, le forme naturali.

paiko_450

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

andy-paiko-bell-jars

6987955440_7cdbabf12b_o

Paiko,Andy-glass_sculptures-2008-06-Portland-Oregon-USA-Manette

Le conchiglie sembrano integrarsi come una viva escrescenza nella struttura in vetro; le spine dorsali di coyote o di cervo, talvolta placcate in oro, continuano e prolungano la fantasia delle spire trasparenti che le salvaguardano come fossero preziose reliquie.

7134039331_e01380f7c6_o

andy-paiko-bell-jars2

andy-paiko-coyote-skull

andy-paiko-object-jar2

andy-paiko-spine-jar

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Con il tempo l’artista ha saputo creare uno stile immediatamente riconoscibile, un gusto e un’abilità sorprendenti nello sfruttare i giochi della luce, che si insinua e si rifrange nelle sue composizioni. Infatti Andy Paiko non soffia semplicemente il vetro, ma utilizza tecniche miste. Lo sagoma, lo stampa, lo taglia, lo manipola alla fiamma, lo colora, in una continua ricerca per nuove sfumature d’espressione. Lavorare il vetro, in fondo, è una sorta di alchimia che unisce la terra, il fuoco, l’acqua e la luce in una sola opera. A questi, Paiko è capace di aggiungere altri due elementi: l’ammirazione per la vita naturale e per l’ingegno umano.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRIrtk5XYC4]

Ecco il sito ufficiale dell’artista.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – II

Come resistere alla tentazione dello shopping a New York, quando la città si riveste di luci natalizie e le vetrine dei negozi divengono delle vere e proprie opere d’arte? In questo secondo, ed ultimo, post sulla Grande Mela ci occupiamo quindi di negozi – ma se vi aspettate che vi parliamo di Tiffany o di Macy’s, siete fuori strada.

Da quando Maxilla & Mandible ha chiuso i battenti (senza avvertire nessuno – sul sito nemmeno un cenno al fatto che il negozio è dismesso) sono poche le botteghe ancora aperte che possono offrire oggetti da collezione naturalistica: Evolution Store è però la punta di diamante di questo strano tipo di esercizio.

Uno scheletro sull’uscio ci avverte del tono generale del negozio, e la vetrina già lascia a bocca aperta: kapala istoriati, teschi di feti umani disposti secondo l’età raggiunta in utero, grandi pavoni impagliati. Non ci sono vie di mezzo – o alzate gli occhi al cielo e proseguite per la vostra strada, o vi fiondate oltre la porta d’ingresso.

All’interno, la cornucopia di oggetti assale i sensi. Ci sono scheletri e teschi di animali di ogni specie, tutti in vendita, esemplari tassidermici, altri sotto alcol, ninnoli e portachiavi ricavati da ossa autentiche. Insomma, troverete il regalo di Natale giusto per chiunque.

E per i vostri bambini più indisciplinati quest’anno, al posto del solito vecchio carbone, Babbo Natale potrebbe lasciare sotto l’albero una nuova sorpresa: leccalecca con scorpioni e altri insetti incorporati.

Al piano superiore i titolari espongono i pezzi di maggior valore della loro collezione. Spicca una serie di scheletri umani, di cui uno femminile che ospita nel grembo uno scheletro fetale fissato in posizione di gravidanza. E poi ancora maschere tribali, teste rimpicciolite, uova di dinosauro, pietre preziose, animali impagliati o essiccati, fossili, coralli, farfalle multicolori e insetti esotici.

I prezzi non sono sempre popolari, ma nemmeno esorbitanti, e variano considerevolmente a seconda delle vostre esigenze. Comunque, se non volete spendere troppo, gli impiegati e i gestori del negozio, tutti accomunati dalla classica gentilezza newyorkese, saranno più che felici di impacchettarvi uno squalo sotto alcol (solo $29) o l’osso del pene di qualche mammifero ($6).

Sbucando con la metro all’East Village si entra in una dimensione totalmente diversa. Le foglie in questa stagione si fanno gialle e risaltano sulle pareti in mattoni e fra le scale antincendio esterne, che abbiamo visto in innumerevoli film. Qui, dalle parti di Cooper Union, c’è St. Mark’s Place, una stradina dedicata ai tatuaggi, ai piercing e all’abbigliamento punk e glam. Residuati della no-future generation, ormai cinquantenni ma ancora orgogliosamente imborchiati e dai (radi) capelli dipinti, gestiscono piccoli negozi di oggettistica e fashion. Anche se non siete tipi da creste e catene, vi consigliamo comunque di farvi un giro all’interno del negozio di vintage e usato Search & Destroy – se non altro per dare un’occhiata al delirante allestimento del negozio.

Qui i vestiti sono quasi nascosti da un’accozzaglia di giocattoli, props e collectibles: e se all’entrata siete salutati da bambole con la maschera antigas, modellini anatomici e feti deformi in gomma, all’interno i toni si fanno ancora più splatter. Un finto maiale sgozzato a grandezza naturale è appeso al soffitto, dal quale penzola anche un manichino fetish in posizione di bondage. Un flipper sta vicino a maschere di carnevale di mostri iperrealistici e sanguinosi. Ovunque manichini in pose oscene e, particolare non trascurabile, dalle parti genitali correttamente rappresentate. Purtroppo i gestori orientali sono (giustamente) gelosi del loro arredamento e ci permettono di scattare soltanto qualche foto.

Poco più avanti, sempre qui all’East Village, sulla decima strada, si trova uno dei negozi più celebri: si tratta di Obscura Antiques & Oddities.

Da quando Obscura è al centro di una serie televisiva di Discovery Channel (di cui vi avevamo parlato in questo articolo), il piccolo spazio espositivo è perennemente affollato. E la gente compra, il giro di affari è in stabile crescita e di conseguenza la collezione è in continuo cambiamento.

Obscura è l’analogo newyorkese del nostro Nautilus, anche se gli manca quella maniacale e coreografica cura espositiva che Alessandro ha donato alla sua bottega delle meraviglie. D’altronde Mike ci racconta che stanno per trasferirsi in uno spazio più grande, dove finalmente la collezione potrà evitare di essere accatastata e un po’ disordinata com’è adesso. Comunque sia, i pezzi sono davvero straordinari e l’atmosfera unica.

Fra tutti spicca la testa mummificata divenuta un po’ il simbolo di Obscura, tanto da farne delle minuscole repliche per portachiavi.

Ma le sorprese sono tante, e fra scheletri umani, strani animali, oggetti di antiquariato medico e bizzarrie in tutto e per tutto ascrivibili alla tradizione denominata Americana, si potrebbe perdere una buona oretta a curiosare.

Mike ed Evan, la strana coppia di proprietari, sono fra le persone più gentili e disponibili del mondo, talmente colti e appassionati che è una goduria anche solo rimanere ad ascoltarli mentre rispondono alle domande più stravaganti dei clienti. Il giro di collezionismo legato ad Obscura è impressionante, ma di certo anche voi riuscirete a trovare almeno un regalino per chi, fra i vostri conoscenti, ha già davvero tutto.

MEAT

Dimitri Tsykalov è un artista russo. Utilizza diverse tecniche di scultura per trasformare oggetti comuni in opere d’arte stupefacenti e metaforicamente stimolanti.

Ha cominciato costruendo alcune installazioni che ricreano completamente in legno oggetti che normalmente sono composti di altri materiali: in questo interno di una camera, ad esempio, tutto, dal cuscino alle coperte, al computer, al lavandino, al WC, ogni cosa è interamente scolpita nel legno.

In seguito, ha costruito una Porsche a grandezza naturale, ancora in legno. Le sue sono opere d’arte che ci spingono a guardare diversamente certi aspetti della realtà. Deperiscono velocemente di fronte agli occhi degli spettatori: in un certo senso, offrono delle forme vuote e biodegradabili, come se tutta la nostra tecnologia fosse votata alla distruzione. Questa Porsche non è altro che un segno, riconoscibile, ma il materiale di cui è composta ci rende visibile il suo destino ineluttabile. Basterebbe un po’ d’acqua per rovinarla completamente, e prima o poi la sua struttura si disintegrerà, distruggendo contemporaneamente il simbolo con tutti i valori che ad esso sono connessi.

Stesso discorso vale per gli organi umani in legno: sembrano fissi ed eterni, ma esibiscono anche una fragilità che conosciamo bene, anche se raramente ci soffermiamo a rifletterci.

Per rendere ancora più chiaro il concetto, Tsykalov è poi passato a scolpire teschi ricavati da vegetali: la “vita” di queste opere è ancora minore. Risulta chiaro che le sue non sono altro che moderne vanitas, destinate a ricordarci la futilità delle nostre esistenze.

Ma è con la sua ultima opera che Tsykalov ha davvero creato qualcosa di unico e impressionante. Intitolata MEAT (“carne”), la serie ci mostra i corpi nudi di diversi modelli che impugnano armi fatte di carne, indossano elmetti scolpiti a partire da bistecche e insaccati, sono imprigionati da catene di salsicce.

Queste fotografie toccano alcuni punti precisi del nostro sistema simbolico. Da una parte, ammiccano alla (con)fusione di carne e metallo che gran parte ha avuto nell’iconografia post-moderna. Dall’altra, mostrano una guerra fatta di carne e sangue, in cui l’avanzata tecnologia non appare più fredda e metallica, ma costruita con le stesse logiche del macello. Inoltre, l’utilizzo di hot-dog, hamburger e altre forme di consumo della carne, riporta tutto all’idea del cibo. La bellezza dei modelli contrasta con le macabre situazioni in cui sono coinvolti.

La rappresentazione di Tsykalov mira a mostrare l’essere umano per ciò che è veramente. Un’accozzaglia di bellezza e putridume, violenza ed estasi, bisogni animaleschi e illusioni razionalistiche. Ed è proprio sui simboli che Tsykalov lavora più efficacemente: vedere una bandiera (che potrebbe essere qualsiasi bandiera) completamente composta di carne macellata non può che far riflettere.

Immortalità

La paura della morte è un processo psicologico riscontrabile in pressoché tutte le culture, ed è dovuto alla capacità del pensiero umano di figurarsi in future e passate situazioni, a trascendere il presente per visualizzare immagini differenti. La certezza della nostra dipartita deriva dall’osservazione della più basilare delle leggi naturali: il mondo è un continuo cambiare di forme, un aggregarsi e un disgregarsi senza tregua, e se siamo vivi lo dobbiamo al fatto che qualcun altro è morto. Quindi, sappiamo che siamo spacciati. Allacciamo la cintura di sicurezza ogni giorno, guardiamo bene prima di attraversare sulle strisce, facciamo check-up medici, ma in fondo sappiamo che prima o poi toccherà a noi. Secondo alcuni psicologi questo terrore è talmente paralizzante che la stessa cultura non sarebbe altro che uno stratagemma per sfuggire dalla paura della morte: un complesso sistema di produzione di senso, di modo che ci illudiamo di sapere cosa ci serve, cosa è importante, cosa si può fare e cosa no, quali sono le regole del successo, quali sono i valori e le tradizioni, chi siamo veramente –  un’imponente struttura simbolica in cui ognuno occupa una precisa posizione con doveri e diritti. Questo per combattere l’idea della morte, che annulla ogni senso e vanifica ogni nostro sforzo.

Dall’altro versante, la morte è stata combattuta concretamente e simbolicamente con le tecniche più disparate. Dagli elisir di lunga vita e la ricerca della pietra filosofale nell’alchimia classica, alle pratiche magiche e spirituali del Taoismo religioso, fino alla costruzione di mitologie che spostassero la vita oltre i limiti del corpo vero e proprio (il Nirvana, l’aldilà, la resurrezione Cristiana, ecc.) o che concedessero la consolazione di un’immortalità differita (raggiunta attraverso opere artistiche o dell’ingegno, attraverso la rilevanza storica acquisita dalla persona, attraverso l’atto di mettere al mondo dei figli per continuare a “vivere” nel loro ricordo, ecc.).

Oggi però anche la scienza tenta l’impossibile. Da trent’anni i ricercatori stanno studiando e mettendo a punto processi che rallentino l’invecchiamento. Ovviamente restare giovani non basterebbe, ma dovrebbe essere coadiuvato da ulteriori progressi medico-chirurgici per proteggerci da malattie e incidenti. Inoltre il quadro si complica se pensiamo alla densità di popolazione attuale – andrebbero risolti ovviamente anche i problemi relativi alle risorse energetiche. Da queste poche righe, è chiaro che stiamo parlando ancora di estrema fantascienza, nonostante l’ottimismo di alcuni ricercatori (vedi questo articolo).

A quanto ne sappiamo, in natura esiste un solo animale virtualmente immortale. Si tratta della turritopsis nutricula, un tipo di idrozoo della famiglia Oceanidae. Questa medusa è l’unico animale in grado di invertire il proprio orologio biologico: dopo aver raggiunto la maturità sessuale, la t. nutricula è capace di ritornare allo stadio immaturo, e regredire allo stato di polipo. Un po’ come una farfalla che si tramutasse in bruco, insomma. Questa sorprendente trasformazione è possibile grazie a un processo chiamato transdifferenziazione, in cui un tipo di cellula altera il proprio corredo genetico e diviene un altro tipo di cellula. Altri animali sono capaci di limitate transdifferenziazioni (ad alcune salamandre possono crescere nuovi arti), ma soltanto la t. nutricula rigenera il suo corpo tutto intero. Il processo teoricamente potrebbe essere ripetuto all’infinito, se non fosse che le meduse sono soggette agli stessi pericoli degli altri animali e poche di loro arrivano ad avere l’opportunità di ritornare polipi, prima di finire sul menu di qualche pesce più grosso. Ma, chi lo sa? forse proprio questa minuscola medusa svelerà agli scienziati il segreto per invertire l’invecchiamento.

Il progresso tecnologico avanza a passi da gigante. La scienza si sta già avvicinando alla produzione di organi di ricambio, la ricerca su clonazione, staminali e nanotecnologie applicate alla medicina promette di cambiare il modo in cui pensiamo al futuro. L’idea che non noi, non i nostri figli, ma magari i nostri lontani pronipoti potrebbero avere accesso a vite, se non eterne, lunghe qualche centinaio di anni, stimola la fantasia e pone inediti problemi morali e filosofici. Certamente molti lettori, stando al gioco della speculazione fantascientifica, si domanderanno: ne vale davvero la pena? Chi vorrebbe vivere così a lungo? Non sarebbe forse meglio trovare un modo per imparare a morire serenamente, piuttosto che imparare a vivere in eterno? Altri penseranno invece che, se c’è questa possibilità, perché non provare?

Se qualcuno fosse curioso di approfondire il discorso, questo libro di E. Boncinelli e G. Sciarretta traccia il sogno dell’immortalità dalle origini mitologiche fino alla scienza moderna; il bellissimo documentario Flight From Death – The Quest for Immortality analizza invece la psicologia della morte, la creazione della cultura come schermo protettivo, e l’accettazione del nostro destino finale.

In chiusura, proponiamo come spunto di riflessione la splendida incoscienza (e l’intuitiva saggezza) di una delle più belle fiabe, il capolavoro di James M. Barrie Le Avventure di Peter Pan: “Morire sarà una grande meravigliosa avventura.”