Dirty Dick, The Man Who Stopped Washing

This article originally appeared on The LondoNerD, an Italian blog on the secrets of London.

I have about an hour to complete my mission.
Just out of Liverpool Street Station, I look around waiting for my eyes to adapt to the glaring street. The light is harsh, quite oddly indeed as those London clouds rest on the Victorian buildings like oilcloth. Or like a shroud, I find myself thinking — a natural free association, since I stand a few steps away from those areas (the 19th-Century slums of Whitchapel and Spitafield) where the Ripper was active.
But my mission has nothing to do with old Jack.
The job was assigned to me by The LondoNerD himself: knowing I would have a little spare time before my connection, he wrote me a laconic note:

You should head straight for Dirty Dicks. And go down in the toilets.

Now: having The LondoNerD as a friend is always a sure bet, when you’re in the City. He knows more about London than most of actual Londoners, and his advice is always valuable.
And yet I have to admit that visiting a loo, especially in a place called Dirty Dicks, is not a prospect which makes me sparkle with enthusiasm.

But then again, this proposal must conceal something that has to do with my interests. Likely, some macabre secret.
For those who don’t know me, that’s what I do for a living: I deal with bizarre and macabre stuff. My (very unserious) business card reads: Explorer of the Uncanny, Collector of Wonders.

The collection the card refers to is of course made of physical obejects, coming from ancient times and esotic latitudes, which I cram inside my cabinets; but it’s also a metaphore for the strange forgotten stories I have been collecting and retelling for many years — historical adecdotes proving how the world never really ceased to be an enchanted place, overflowing with wonders.

But enough, time is running out.

Taking long strides I move towards Dirty Dicks, at 202 Bishopsgate. And it’s not much of a surprise to find that, given the name on the signs, the pub’s facade is one of the most photographed by tourists, amidst chuckles and faux-Puritan winks.

The blackboard by the door remarks upon a too often ignored truth:

I am not at all paranoid (I couldn’t be, since I spend my time dealing with mummies, crypts and anatomical museums), but I reckon the advice is worth following.

Dirty Dicks’ interiors combine the classic English pub atmosphere with a singular, vintage and vaguely hipster design. Old prints hanging from the walls, hot-air-balloon wallpaper, a beautiful chandelier dangling through the bar’s two storeys.

I quickly order my food, and head towards the famous restrooms.

The toilets’ waiting room is glowing with a dim yellow light, but finally, there in the corner, I recognize the objective of my mission. The reason I was sent here.

A two-door cabinet, plunged in semi-obscurity, is decorated with a sign: “Nathaniel Bentley’s Artefacts”.

It is so dark in here that I can barely identify what’s inside the cabinet. (I try and take some pictures, but the sensor, pushed to the limit of its capabilities, only gives back blurred images — for which I apologize with the reader.)

Yes, I can make out a mummified cat. And there’s another one. They remind me of the dead cat and mouse found behind Christ Church‘s organ in Dublin, and displayed in that very church.

No mice here, as far as I can tell, but there’s a spooky withered squirrel watching me with its bulging little eyes.

There are several taxidermied animals, little birds, mammal skulls, old naturalistic prints, gaffs and chimeras built with different animal parts, bottles and vials with unspecified specimens floating in alcohol that’s been clouded for a very long time now.

What is this dusty and moldy cabinet of curiosities doing inside a pub? Who is Nathaniel Bentley, whom the sign indicates as the creator of the “artefacts”?

The story of this bizarre collection is strictly tied to the bar’s origins, and its infamous name.
Dirty Dicks has in fact lost (in a humorous yet excellent marketing choice) its ancient genitive apostrophe, referring to a real-life character.
Dirty Dick was the nickname of our mysterious Nathaniel Bentley.

Bentley, who lived in the 18th Century, was the original owner of the pub and also ran a hardware store and a warehouse adjacent to the inn. After a carefree dandy youth, he decided to marry. But, in the most dramatic twist of fate, his bride died on their wedding day.

From that moment on Nathaniel, plunged into the abyss of a desperate grief, gave up washing himself or cleaning his tavern. He became so famous for his grubbiness that he was nicknamed Dirty Dick — and knowing the degree of hygiene in London at the time, the filth on his person and in his pub must have been really unimaginable.
Letters sent to his store were simply addressed to “The Dirty Warehouse”. It seems that even Charles Dickens, in his Great Expectations, might have taken inspiration from Dirty Dick for the character of Miss Havisham, the bride left at the altar who refuses to take off her wedding dress for the rest of her life.

In 1804 Nathaniel closed all of his commercial activities, and left London. After his death in 1809 in Haddington, Lincolnshire, other owners took over the pub, and decided to capitalize on the famous urban legend. They recreated the look of the old squallid warehouse, keeping their bottles of liquor constantly covered in dust and cobwebs, and leaving around the bar (as a nice decor) those worn-out stuffed and mummified animals Dirty Dick never cared to throw in the trash.

Today that Dirty Dicks is all clean and tidy, and the only smell is of good cuisine, the relics have been moved to this cabinet near the toilets. As a reminder of one of the countless, eccentric and often tragic stories that punctuate the history of London.

Funny how times change. Once the specialty of the house was filth, now it’s the inviting and delicious pork T-bone that awaits me when I get back to my table.

And that I willingly tackle, just to ward off potential kidnappers.

The LondoNerD is an Italian blog, young but already full of wonderful insights: weird, curious and little-knowns stories about London. You can follow on Facebook and Twitter

Spirits of the Road: The Cult of Animitas

The traveler who exits the Estación Central in Santiago, Chile and walks down San Francisco de Borja street, after less than twenty meters will stumble upon a sort of votive wall, right on the side of the train station on his left, a space choke-full of little engravings, offerings, perpetually lit candles, photographs and holy pictures. A simple sign says: “Romualdito”, the same name present on every thankful ex voto.

If our hypothetical traveler then takes a cab and heads down the Autopista del Sol towards the suburb of Maipù, he will see by the side of the opposite lane an altar quite similar to the first one, dedicated to a young girl called Astrid whose portrait is almost buried under dozens of toys and plush bears.

Should he cross the entirety of Chile’s narrow strip of land, encased between the mountains and the ocean, maybe crossing from time to time the border to the Argentinian pampas, he would notice that the landscape (both urban and rural) is studded with numerous of these strange little temples: places of devotion where veneration is not directed towards canonical saints, but to the spirits of people whose life ended in tragedy. This is the cult of the animitas.

An expression of popular piety, the animitas are votive boxes that are often built by the side of the road (animita de carretera) to remember some victims of the “mala muerte”, an awful death: even if the remains of these persons are buried at the cemetery, they cannot really rest in peace on the account of the violent circumstances of their demise. Their souls still haunt the places where life was taken from them.

 

The Romualdito at the train station, for instance, was a little boy who suffered from tubercolosis, assaulted and killed by some thugs who wanted to steal his poncho and the 15 pesos he had on him. But his story, dating back to the 1930s, is told in countless versions, more or less legendary, and it’s impossible to ascertain exactly what happened: one thing is sure, the popular faith in Romualdito is so widespread in Santiago that when it was time to renew and rebuild the station, his wall was left untouched.

Young Astrid, the girl with the plush toys altar, died in 1998 in a motorcycle accident, when she was just 19-years-old. She is now known as the Niña Hermosa.

But these funeral altars can be found by the hundreds, mostly installed by the roadside, shaped like little houses or small churches with crosses sicking out of their tiny roofs.

At first they are built as an act of mercy and remembrance on the exact spot of the fatal accident (or, in the case of fishermen lost at sea, in specific sectors of the coast); but they become the center of a real cult whenevert the soul of the deceased proves to be miraculous (animita muy milagrosa). When, that is, the spirit starts answering to prayers and offerings with particular favors, by interceding bewteen the believer and the Holy Virgin or Christ himself.

 The cult of the animitas is an original mixture of the indigenous, pre-Hispanic cult of the dead (where the ancestor turned into a benign presence offering protection to his offspring) and the cult of the souls of Purgatory which arrived here with Catholicism.
For this reason it shows surprising analogies with another form of folk religiosity developed in Naples, at the Fontanelle Cemetery, a place to which I devoted my book
De profundis.
The two cults, not officially recognized by the Roman Church, have some fundamental aspects in common.

Animitas, built with recycled material, are folk art objects that closely resemble the carabattoli found in the Fontanelle Cemetery; not only for their shape but also for their function of making a dialectic, a dialogue with the Netherworld possible.
Secondly, the system of intercessions and favors, the offerings and the ex voto, are essentially the same in both cases.

But the crucial element is that the objects of veneration are not religious heroes, those saints who accomplished miraculous feats while they were alive, but rather victims of destiny. This allows for the identification between the believer and the invoked soul, the acknowledging of their reciprocal condition, a sharing of human misery – a feeling which is almost impossible when faced with “supernatural” figures like saints. Who of course have themselves an apotropaic function, but always maintain a higher position in respect to common mortals.
On the other hand the
animitas, just like the anime pezzentelle in Naples, are “democratic” symbols, offering a much easier relationship: they share with the believers the same social milieu, they know firsthand all the daily hardship and difficulties of survival. They are protective spirits which can be bothered even for more modest, trivial miracles, because they once were ordinary people, and they understand.

But while in Italy the cult developed exclusively in one town, in Chile it is quite ubiquitous. To have an idea of the tenacity and pervasiveness of this faith, there is one last, amazing example.
Ghost bikes (white-painted bicycles remembering a cyclist who was run over by a car) can be seen all around the world, and they are meant as a warning against accidents. When these installations began to appear in Chile, they immediately intertwined with popular devotion giving birth to hybrids called
bicianimitas. Boxes for the ritual offerings began to appear beside the white bicycles, and the funeral memorials turned into a bridge for communication between the living and the dead.
Those living and dead that, the
animitas seem to remind us, are never really separated but coexist on the city streets or along the side of dusty highways stretching out into the desert.

The blog Animitas Chilenas intends to create an archive of all animitas, recording for each one the name of the soul, her history and GPS coordinates.
Besides the links in the article, I highly recommend the essay by Lautaro Ojeda,
Animitas – Una expresión informal y democrática de derecho a la ciudad (in ARQ Santiago n. 81 agosto 2012) and the in-depth post El culto urbano de la muerte: el origen y la trascendencia de las animitas en Chile, by Criss Salazar.
Photographer Patricio Valenzuela Hohmann put up a
wonderful animitas photo gallery.
Lastly, you should check out the
Difunta Correa, Argentina’s most famous animita, dedicated to the legendary figure of a woman who died of thirst and fatigue in the Nineteenth Century while following her husband – who had been forced to enroll in the army; her body was found under a tree, still holding her newborn baby to her breast. The cult of the Difunta Correa is so widespread that it led to the construction of a real sanctuary in Vallecito, visited by one million pilgrims every year.

De profundis

The second title of the Bizzarro Bazar Series is now available for pre-order.

After exploring the Palermo Capuchin Catacombs in the first volume, now we enter another unique place, the Fontanelle Cemetery in Naples, where one of the most peculiar and fascinating devotional cults has developed.

_XT10188

Buried in the heart of the city, the Sanità quarter is an authentic borderland between the world of the living and the world of the dead. You only need to distance yourself from the hustle and bustle, from the megaphones of the fruit and vegetable stalls, the mopeds ridden by fearless street urchins darting between the cars, and reach the top of the area: here on the right of the church of Maria Santissima del Carmine, is the Fontanelle cemetery.

Situated within an ancient tuff quarry, the cemetery is an imposing underground cathedral, hovering between darkness and the swathes of light cutting through it.

Thousands of bones and skulls are piled up for all to see, the remains of at least 40,000 anonymous human beings. In this evocative and peaceful place, death is no longer insurmountable: the living and the souls of the deceased communicate with each other by means of the so-called capuzzelle, which embody the ancestral obsession with the skull as an icon of transcendence and the promise of eternal life.

 

_XT10070

_XT10441 1

_XT10483

_XT10480

Here the skulls are spoken to, touched, and cleaned. They are taken care of. Candles are lit, offerings are given and favours asked for in a do ut des of worship.

This is the cult of the anime pezzentelle, abandoned and anonymous souls, in need of the compassion of the living to alleviate their suffering in Purgatory. In return, they promise to be kind to the devout believer, helping out with health problems, finding a husband for young unmarried girls, solving financial issues or providing the winning lottery numbers. Although the cult is now almost completely abandoned, it still resists, and its traces are well visible in the Cemetery.

_XT10461

_XT10349

There are countless ossuaries around the world, but the suggestion of the Fontanelle Cemetery is quite specific. On one hand, the compassionate and sober disposition of the human remains shows no sign of macabre or baroque taste, introducing the visitor to a suspended quiet as if he was entering a real sanctuary; on the other hand, the devotion of the people has somewhat mitigated the memento mori effect – not just on the account of those colorful, often ironic legends and myths surrounding the skulls, but also by elaborating the cult of the souls of Purgatory in a peculiar way, through unprecedented rules and rituals. Thus, adding to the wonder of thousands of piled up bones under the immense vault, one can feel a palpable devotion, transforming the skulls from figurations of mortality to symbols of transcendence.

Carlo Vannini‘s photographs plunge us into the enchanted atmosphere of the underground cathedral, revealing its gloomy charm and bringing us so close to the capuzzelle – bare or adorned with various votive offerings such as handkerchieves, little holy pictures, coloured rosary beads etc. – that their eyeholes seem to meet our eyes with a glance which is not less alive.

_XT10238

_XT10468

_XT10316

De profundis, with texts in Italian and English, will be available in Italian bookstores (and online retailers worldwide) from May 18th and will be officially launched at the Turin International Book Fair, with book signing sessions on May 16 th and 17 th.

If you are not going to attend the book fair, you can order your signed copy here, which will be shipped after the book fair is over, by May 25th.

For further info, please check out the official bookstore for the Bizzarro Bazar series and our Facebook page.

cover_deprofundis-2

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – I

View on Paris

Qualche anno fa avevamo pubblicato due articoli-reportage su New York (li trovate qui e qui), dedicati a musei, negozi e luoghi insoliti della Grande Mela. Quest’anno, invece, il vostro fedele esploratore del perturbante si è diretto a Parigi, dove ha scovato per voi alcuni fra gli angoli meno battuti della capitale francese.

Già nel XVIII secolo Francesco Algarotti sentenziava “molti vanno a Parigi, ma pochi ci sono stati“, e forse questo è ancora più vero oggi che il turismo di massa detta le regole per visitare qualsiasi città, imponendo al viaggiatore tutta una serie di tappe obbligate da spuntare come caselline della tombola. Questa esperienza di superficie certamente rassicura il pellegrino di aver visto “tutte le cose più importanti”, ma rischia di farlo tornare a casa con l’immagine della città che già aveva prima di partire. E invece anche Parigi, come tutti i luoghi ricchi d’una storia antica e travagliata, nasconde un volto sconosciuto ai più.

Dimenticatevi quindi – o, meglio, date pure per assodati – i fasti di Versailles, le folle che risalgono la Torre Eiffel, gli assiepati scalini di Montmartre, il sorriso beffardo della Gioconda o lo shopping di lusso sui Champs-Elisées; e preparatevi per un viaggio alla scoperta dei meravigliosi gioielli che le luci della Ville Lumière hanno lasciato nella penombra.

ecole_veterinaire2

Come prima tappa partiamo dalla banlieue a sud-est di Parigi, a soli tre chilometri dalla capitale, visitando a Maisons-Alfort il Musée Fragonard, che si trova ospitato all’interno della Scuola Veterinaria. Qui un’immensa collezione di ossa e di scheletri animali si contende la scena con dei modelli in gesso degli organi interni, a grandezza naturale oppure in scala notevolmente maggiore, a fini di studio.

fragonard-1

fragonard-2

fragonard-3

fragonard-4

fragonard-5

fragonard-6

fragonard-7

fragonard-8

fragonard-9

fragonard-10

fragonard-11

fragonard-12

Le cose cominciano a farsi più impressionanti quando si raggiunge la sezione teratologica del museo, che espone le diverse malformazioni, mutazioni genetiche e mostruosità. Preparati a secco, mummificati, oppure in soluzione ci presentano la versione animale dei “gemelli siamesi”: agnelli craniopaghi e toracopaghi, maiali con sviluppi fetali parassitari e galline con arti in sovrannumero si alternano a feti ciclopi, vitelli idrocefali e capre nate senza testa (anencefalia).

fragonard-13

fragonard-14

fragonard-15

fragonard-16

fragonard-17

fragonard-18

fragonard-19

fragonard-20

fragonard-21

fragonard-22

fragonard-23

fragonard-24

Ma è nell’ultima stanza che sono contenuti i reperti più straordinari. Si tratta dei celebri écorchés di Fragonard, di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo: duecento anni prima di Gunther Von Hagens e del suo Body Worlds, e senza alcuna delle tecnologie ultramoderne disponibili oggi, l’anatomista francese era riuscito a preservare perfettamente alcuni cadaveri sezionati e fissati in modo da esporre l’anatomia interna a beneficio degli studenti.

fragonard-25

fragonard-26

fragonard-27

fragonard-28

In alcuni casi disposti in pose artistiche, come “l’uomo con la mandibola” o i “feti danzanti“, i preparati anatomici sono ancora perfetti, con le loro vernici lucide e brillanti e un’espressività per nulla diminuita dal passare dei secoli.

fragonard-31

fragonard-29

fragonard-30

fragonard-32

fragonard-33

fragonard-34

Difficile non rimanere a bocca aperta di fronte al più incredibile fra tutti i pezzi conservati qui: il “Cavaliere dell’Apocalisse“, montato su un vero e proprio cavallo, a sua volta sezionato.

fragonard-35

fragonard-36

fragonard-37

fragonard-38

fragonard-39

fragonard-40

Spostiamoci ora nel cuore della città.
Quartiere un tempo malfamato, divenuto iconico per i suoi spettacoli osé, per il Moulin Rouge, i bordelli, il Grand Guignol e i cafés a tema, Pigalle si è oggi adeguato ai tempi e alle esigenze turistiche, reinventandosi come paradiso dei locali di lap dance e dei negozi del sesso. Lungo il Boulevard de Clichy le vetrine propongono, senza censure o pudori, una costellazione di futuristici sex toys, coadiuvanti, afrodisiaci, ritardanti, arditi capi di lingerie affiancati al consueto armamentario BDSM fatto di cuoio, borchie, scudisci e ball gag.

Proprio al centro di questa esibizione del sesso fatto spettacolo e merchandising, si apre il Musée de l’Erotisme. Anche ad Amsterdam, nel Red Light District, ne esiste uno di simile, ma quello di Parigi si distingue dal suo omonimo olandese per almeno tre motivi: il primo è la ricchezza della sezione antropologica, che conta svariate decine di manufatti provenienti da diverse epoche e latitudini.

erotisme-1

erotisme-2

erotisme-3

erotisme-4

erotisme-5

erotisme-6

Dalle terrecotte etrusche ai feticci africani, dalle colorate statue balinesi agli avori cinesi, la collezione dimostra come il tema erotico sia stato affrontato senza particolari inibizioni da quasi tutte le culture tradizionali e spesso proprio nel contesto dell’arte sacra (come simbolo/auspicio/invocazione di fecondità e fertilità).

erotisme-7

erotisme-8

erotisme-9

erotisme-10

erotisme-11

Il secondo punto di interesse è la parte dedicata alla storia e al costume delle case chiuse dalla fine del I secolo al 1946, con fotografie d’epoca, documenti vari e perfino un bidet in porcellana originale (come è noto, questo accessorio da bagno si diffuse proprio nell’ambito della prostituzione).

erotisme-12

erotisme-13

erotisme-14

erotisme-15

erotisme-16

erotisme-17

Infine, ai livelli più alti (il museo si sviluppa su ben sette piani!) vengono ospitate mostre temporanee di artisti internazionali, le cui opere esposte sono in alcuni casi disponibili per l’acquisto.

erotisme-18

erotisme-19

erotisme-21

erotisme-23

erotisme-22

erotisme-20

Ben più dei sexy shop che lo circondano, il Museo rimanda un’immagine dell’eros che un po’ si è andata a perdere nel tempo: attraverso queste varie declinazioni artistiche, raffigurazioni antiche e contemporanee, il desiderio sessuale viene riportato alla sua originaria dimensione mitologica, archetipica e sacra.

erotisme-24

Dall’Eros passiamo a Thanatos, e addentriamoci nei labirinti sotterranei che si snodano sotto le case di Montparnasse.
Nonostante il loro nome ricordi quelle romane, le Catacombe di Parigi erano in realtà le antiche cave da cui veniva estratta la pietra per costruire la città: quando nel 1785 il Cimitero degli Innocenti nel quartiere delle Halles, che era stato in uso per quasi dieci secoli, venne evacuato a causa del pericolo d’infezione, si decise di spostare i resti nelle cave ormai abbandonate. Consacrate nel 1786 come ossario municipale, le Catacombe ospitarono fino al 1814 le salme traslate da tutti i cimiteri della capitale, mano a mano che questi venivano chiusi per insalubrità. Oggi si stima che vi siano raccolte le ossa di circa sei o sette milioni di parigini.

catacombes-1

catacombes-2

catacombes-3

catacombes-4

catacombes-5

catacombes-9

Fermati, qui sta l’impero della morte“, avverte un verso inciso all’entrata dell’ossario.
A venti metri sotto il suolo, sui lati degli stretti corridoi e delle gallerie oscure, sono disposte le une sulle altre migliaia e migliaia di ossa, a formare una scenografia macabra impressionante.

catacombes-10

catacombes-7

catacombes-11

catacombes-12

catacombes-13

catacombes-14

catacombes-15

Talvolta il muro di teschi e tibie si apre su camere più larghe, piccoli altari, croci o altri luoghi di raccoglimento. Lungo tutto il percorso (di ben due chilometri) sono disseminati poemi, aforismi, testi sacri e profani che esortano a meditare sulla propria mortalità.

catacombes-16

catacombes-17

catacombes-18

catacombes-19

catacombes-20

Questi morti accerchiano il visitatore, lo soverchiano in numero schiacciante – è davvero l’Impero della Morte, con le sue armate silenziose, che ci attende quaggiù: eppure, paradossalmente, non ci si può sentire dei veri e propri intrusi in questo mondo senza luce, perché il destino che attende tutti gli uomini accomuna l’ospite a questi resti anonimi. Fra le ossa vi sono, probabilmente, anche quelle di Rabelais, La Fontaine, Perrault, così come i ghigliottinati Danton e Robespierre, eppure nulla ormai li distingue dai loro coetanei. Mai come quaggiù l’égalité del motto nazionale francese assume una sfumatura beffarda e, al tempo stesso, stranamente rassicurante.

catacombes-23

catacombes-21

catacombes-26

catacombes-25

catacombes-27

MUSEE FRAGONARD
7, avenue Général-de-Gaulle
Maisons-Alfort
Apertura: mercoledì e giovedì, sabato e domenica
Orari: 14-18

MUSEE DE L’EROTISME
72 Boulevard de Clichy
Apertura: tutti i giorni
Orari: 10-02
Sito web

CATACOMBES DE PARIS
1, avenue du Colonel Henri Rol-Tanguy (place Denfert-Rochereau)
Apertura: da martedì a domenica
Orari: 10-20
Sito web

(Questo articolo è il primo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. Gli altri due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Regali di Natale

sax-player-loves-santa

Le festività sono alle porte e, come tutti gli anni, la magia del Natale viene incrinata dalla più temuta delle incombenze: la scelta dei regali adeguati. Se durante tutto il resto dell’anno ci reputiamo persone creative, in questo periodo qualsiasi briciolo di originalità sembra abbandonarci definitivamente, e più ci straziamo le meningi per farci venire qualche idea, più la nostra fantasia rimane muta e desolata come la page blanche che tanto ossessiona gli scrittori.

È forse quest’ansia da prestazione che ha spinto la nostra lettrice horrorboutiqueph a richiedere a gran voce, in un recente commento, un articolo di consigli sullo shopping natalizio. La accontentiamo volentieri, sperando di fare cosa gradita a quanti di voi sono alla frenetica ricerca di quello spunto particolare che trasforma il risaputo scambio dei pacchi in un evento memorabile.

Ecco dunque alcune idee per i doni di Natale, in puro stile Bizzarro Bazar.

1. Adottare un teschio

Il Mütter Museum di Philadelphia è uno dei musei di storia della medicina più noti a livello mondiale, grazie anche a un’intelligente valorizzazione “pubblicitaria” delle sue collezioni. Oltre a conferenze, iniziative di vario genere e sontuosi cataloghi, c’è addirittura chi ha celebrato le proprie nozze fra le sue mura.
Fino al 31 Dicembre (ma gli organizzatori stanno valutando la possibilità di estendere questa deadline) si può prendere parte alla nuova e innovativa campagna “Save Our Skulls”. Avete la possibilità, al costo di 200$, di riservare l’adozione di uno dei 139 teschi della collezione frenologica del museo per garantire il suo restauro – ed assicurare che il nome del benefattore sia ben visibile su una targhetta a fianco del cranio esposto nel museo. Sta a voi scegliere, anche in base alla storia di questi antichi reperti: c’è il teschio della prostituta viennese, quello del criminale tailandese, l’equilibrista che si è spezzato il collo durante un spettacolo, il fanatico russo che, seguendo i dettami di una setta che praticava la castrazione preventiva contro le insidie della lussuria, morì di ferite autoinflitte mentre cercava di asportarsi i testicoli con un metodo troppo casalingo.
Il Museo vi spedirà un certificato e una foto del cranio con la relativa targhetta: l’amico o il parente a titolo del quale avete fatto l’iscrizione non potrà che commuoversi sapendo che, oltreoceano, il suo nome compare di fianco al teschio di un malato di sifilide o di un suicida.

geza

Save Our Skulls

2. Il bagnoschiuma

Gli articoli per il benessere della persona non passano mai di moda, perché coniugano il piacere con l’utilità. Ecco quindi un gel bagno/doccia particolare, divertente e di raffinato buongusto, particolarmente consigliato per i fan di Psycho o di Dexter.

BATH-1238

Blood Bath Shower Gel

3. Le opere di Mala Tempora

Giulio Artioli è un artista italiano che realizza, “in un angolo caotico di casa”, degli strani e affascinanti ibridi da collezione. Ispirate al mondo delle wunderkammern e dei sideshow, della letteratura fantastica e delle stranezze anatomiche, le creazioni di “Mala Tempora” (questo il nome dell’atelier) hanno il fascino degli oggetti impossibili: vi trovano posto le Sirene del Pacifico, gli sfuggenti Vescovi di mare, i reperti di antiche esplorazioni, uno studio anatomico di brigante calabrese, teste mummificate, feti di balene, scheletri di gnomo e teschi di gemelli siamesi. Il tutto, ovviamente, ricreato dalle mani dell’artista: ogni opera è inoltre corredata da un’accurata e dettagliata storia dell’esemplare in questione, e queste righe sono talmente affascinanti e dense di meraviglia da valere da sole gran parte dell’acquisto.

Preserved_human_fetus_1

Pacific_Ocean_Mermaid_3

4

Mala Tempora Studio

4. La poltrona per le fotocopie

Un vostro conoscente è un importante uomo d’affari – il classico uomo che ha già tutto e al quale non sapete proprio cosa regalare, a parte l’ennesimo dopobarba? Articolo di design e di arredamento assieme, questa poltrona (opera dell’artista Tomomi Sayuda) è il perfetto complemento per ogni ufficio. Appena una persona vi si siede, si attiva la fotocopiatrice nascosta al suo interno. Certo, un po’ si perde il brivido del proibito, quando, da soli nella stanza delle fotocopie, ci si trovava a combattere contro questo tipo di irresistibili istinti.

xerox-ass

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QxI2Ix-Njg]

Tomomi Sayuda

5. Il titolo nobiliare

Ecco un dono che è segno di rispetto e di devozione.
In Scozia, chiunque acquisti dei possedimenti terrieri può fregiarsi del titolo di Lord o Lady. Così la società Higland Titles ha pensato a un uso intelligente per questo cavillo: suddividendo la foresta di Glencoe (sede di uno storico massacro e importante riserva naturale) in minuscoli appezzamenti di meno di un metro quadro, e mettendoli in vendita, garantisce all’acquirente la possibilità di diventare un Lord. L’iniziativa ha una finalità ecologica, cioè garantire che l’area boschiva non divenga mai terreno edificabile, e allo stesso tempo assicurare introiti aggiuntivi per i servizi forestali.

Ma, siamo sinceri, il bello è che regalare un titolo nobiliare fa sempre il suo effetto. E sì, il nuovo appellativo può essere registrato sui documenti ufficiali come ad esempio passaporto o carta d’identità.

(Per inciso, chi scrive è già entrato in possesso di un pezzetto delle Highlands scozzesi, proprio grazie alla generosa goliardia di alcuni amici. D’ora in poi sappiate che Lord Bizzarro Bazar esige una certa deferenza, da parte di voialtri umili villici.)

Scottish-Highlands

Become a Lord

6. Cordone ombelicale

Siete a cena e il vostro amico, invece di parlare con voi, non la smette di controllare il telefonino. Per molte persone ormai gli smartphone sono parte integrante della vita quotidiana, e vengono accuditi con infinita attenzione, e coccolati come fossero carne della propria carne. Risulta perfetto allora un regalo che è anche un efficace monito, pensato per chi fa del proprio iPhone un prolungamento del corpo, un’appendice o una protesi tecnologica. Un caricabatterie che pulsa e vive, degno di David Cronenberg, dimostra come perfino il cellulare possa diventare un’escrescenza ibrida di materia organica e meccanica. Ecco il vostro bambino, gente.

gc_top

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQPDSES8my0]

Mio I-zawa

Necromance

20131107_160124

Los Angeles, California. I turisti, come sempre, cercano le star su Sunset Boulevard, ridiventano bambini nei parchi di attrazioni degli studios, oppure sognano di essere soccorsi da Pamela Anderson sulle immense spiagge di Santa Monica.

Ma nel cuore dell’assolata metropoli, fra le boutique e i locali notturni della celeberrima Melrose Avenue (e a un paio di isolati dalla Melrose Place della soap opera), sorge una piccola bottega che offre un tipo di shopping un po’ più particolare.

20131107_160235

Si tratta di Necromance, negozio aperto nel 1991, specializzato in esemplari naturalistici e in un vasto assortimento di stranezze. Certo non si tratta di un paradiso come possono essere Obscura di New York o il nostro ex-Nautilus (ora reincarnatosi nell’Obsoleto Store di Modena), e i più snob storceranno il naso vedendo che le giovani proprietarie non fanno segreto della loro inclinazione goth. Ma il mondo è bello perché è vario, e quando si incontrano esercizi simili andrebbero sempre salutati con entusiasmo.

20131107_165328

20131107_164456

20131107_164603

20131107_160316

Necromance è composto di due stanze a tema distinto, tanto che per un periodo il negozio è stato fisicamente diviso in due; la prima sala è quella dedicata alle collezioni naturalistiche. Vi potete trovare conchiglie, teschi e ossa di ogni tipo di animale, scheletri posati, innumerevoli insetti, stampe e illustrazioni, esemplari imbalsamati e preparazioni in liquido.

20131107_160324

20131107_164357

20131107_164416

20131107_164437

20131107_164447

Gli esemplari conservati sotto glicerina e preparati con il metodo clearing and staining sono ottenuti grazie a bagni enzimatici che rendono la carne traslucida; la struttura ossea è quindi colorata in rosso e le cartilagini in blu, in modo da consentirne uno studio approfondito (Nota: se volete divertirvi a giocare al piccolo chimico, qui trovate le istruzioni per rendere un pesce trasparente).

20131107_164655

20131107_164706

20131107_164714

20131107_164728

In questa sezione trovano posto anche molti materiali “a consumo”: cassette piene di ossicini più o meno grandi, piume e penne, zampe di alligatore o di pollo, code e teste di serpenti a sonagli, e via dicendo. Più che servire per qualche rito voodoo, è chiaro che si tratta di rifornimenti per artisti, stilisti fai-da-te e altri clienti interessati a decorare i propri abiti o la propria casa con fantasie macabre.

20131107_164339

20131107_164552

20131107_164523

20131107_164744

20131107_164828

20131107_164756

La seconda stanza del negozio, invece, è dedicata ad altri tipi di collezionismo e di esigenze di mercato. Qui troverete anticaglie di ogni tipo, strumenti medici, fotografie di epoca vittoriana, addobbi funerari, cartoline originali dei freakshow, vecchie macchine fotografiche. Uno scuro armadio svetta in un angolo, colmo di repliche in resina di teschi umani. È anche la stanza dedicata alla gioielleria, tutta ovviamente a tema gotico; alcuni degli ornamenti in esposizione contengono autentiche parti di animali, come i pendagli con testa di pipistrello, gli orecchini con osso di pene di visone, o le spille con feto di topo. È fin troppo facile il sospetto che Necromance sopravviva proprio grazie al commercio di questo tipo di bigiotteria, piuttosto che con i pezzi più “seri” come ad esempio i calchi anatomici in gesso di fine ‘800.

20131107_164955

20131107_164910

20131107_164939

20131107_164927

20131107_165005

20131107_165014

20131107_165042

20131107_165052

20131107_165135

20131107_165309

20131107_165344

Nonostante un negozio simile non possa certo vantare la popolarità dei suoi concorrenti su Melrose Avenue che vendono scintillanti abiti alla moda, riesce comunque a mantenere i prezzi notevolmente bassi per il genere di oggetti da collezione che propone, e senza dubbio questo è il suo maggiore punto di forza.

20131107_165358

20131107_160304

20131107_160350

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Necromance.

Dia de los Natitas

Tutte le tradizioni culturali del mondo hanno elaborato complessi rituali per negare la completa dissoluzione del defunto, ma anzi reintegrarlo nella vita quotidiana in un sistema ammissibile; in questo modo i morti divengono delle “guide” simboliche e vengono inseriti in un quadro di continuità che è un antidoto all’assenza di senso della morte. Perfino nella nostra società, incentrata sul corpo e sul materialismo, diamo nomi di defunti alle strade, parliamo di “immortalità attraverso le opere”, e teniamo scrupolosi resoconti storici relativi ai nostri antenati.
In alcune società questo rapporto che lega i vivi e i morti risulta ancora molto concreto.

In diverse parti dell’America del Sud il cristianesimo si è sviluppato in maniera sincretica con le religioni precedenti; i missionari cioè, piuttosto che combattere le antiche credenze del luogo, hanno cercato di trasfigurare alcuni degli dèi delle popolazioni Quechua e Aymara per farli aderire alle figure tipiche della tradizione cattolica. Alcuni rituali pre-colombiani sono pertanto giunti fino a noi e sono tuttora tollerati dalla Chiesa locale.
Uno di questi antichissimi riti è quello relativo al Dia de los Natitas, ovvero il Giorno dei Teschi.

La Paz, Bolivia, 8 novembre.
In questo giorno centinaia di persone si radunano al cimitero centrale portando con sé i teschi dei propri antenati o dei cari estinti. Il cranio del parente defunto è spesso esposto in elaborate teche di vetro, legno o cartone.

I teschi vengono puliti, purificati, e decorati con addobbi di vario tipo: berretti di lana intessuti a mano, occhiali da sole, ghirlande di fiori coloratissimi. Talvolta le cavità ossee vengono protette otturandole con del cotone.

Una volta ottenuta la benedizione, la gente “coccola” questi resti umani, offrendo loro sigarette, alcol, foglie di coca, cibo e profumi. Una banda tradizionale suona per loro, quasi ad offrire ai morti una particolare serenata.

Come fanno gli abitanti ad essere in possesso di questi teschi, e che significato ha il rituale? La tradizione, come abbiamo detto, è molto antica e precedente all’avvento del cristianesimo. Nella concezione pre-colombiana diffusa in Bolivia ogni uomo è composto da sette anime, di tipo e pesantezza diversi. Quando un parente muore, viene seppellito per un periodo sufficientemente lungo affinché tutte e sei le anime “eteree” possano lasciare il cadavere. L’ultima anima è quella che rimane all’interno dello scheletro, e del cranio in particolare.

Quando si è sicuri che le sei anime se ne siano andate, si dissotterra il cadavere e il teschio viene affidato alla famiglia, che avrà cura di mantenerlo in casa con amore e dedizione, su un altare dedicato. Questi resti, infatti, hanno proprietà magiche e, se trattati con il giusto rispetto, sono in grado di esaudire le preghiere dei parenti. Se, invece, vengono trascurati possono portare sciagure e sfortuna.

Il Dia de los Natitas serve proprio a celebrare questi defunti, a ringraziarli con una grande festa per la buona sorte portata durante l’anno appena trascorso, e ingraziarsi i loro favori per l’anno a venire.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – II

Come resistere alla tentazione dello shopping a New York, quando la città si riveste di luci natalizie e le vetrine dei negozi divengono delle vere e proprie opere d’arte? In questo secondo, ed ultimo, post sulla Grande Mela ci occupiamo quindi di negozi – ma se vi aspettate che vi parliamo di Tiffany o di Macy’s, siete fuori strada.

Da quando Maxilla & Mandible ha chiuso i battenti (senza avvertire nessuno – sul sito nemmeno un cenno al fatto che il negozio è dismesso) sono poche le botteghe ancora aperte che possono offrire oggetti da collezione naturalistica: Evolution Store è però la punta di diamante di questo strano tipo di esercizio.

Uno scheletro sull’uscio ci avverte del tono generale del negozio, e la vetrina già lascia a bocca aperta: kapala istoriati, teschi di feti umani disposti secondo l’età raggiunta in utero, grandi pavoni impagliati. Non ci sono vie di mezzo – o alzate gli occhi al cielo e proseguite per la vostra strada, o vi fiondate oltre la porta d’ingresso.

All’interno, la cornucopia di oggetti assale i sensi. Ci sono scheletri e teschi di animali di ogni specie, tutti in vendita, esemplari tassidermici, altri sotto alcol, ninnoli e portachiavi ricavati da ossa autentiche. Insomma, troverete il regalo di Natale giusto per chiunque.

E per i vostri bambini più indisciplinati quest’anno, al posto del solito vecchio carbone, Babbo Natale potrebbe lasciare sotto l’albero una nuova sorpresa: leccalecca con scorpioni e altri insetti incorporati.

Al piano superiore i titolari espongono i pezzi di maggior valore della loro collezione. Spicca una serie di scheletri umani, di cui uno femminile che ospita nel grembo uno scheletro fetale fissato in posizione di gravidanza. E poi ancora maschere tribali, teste rimpicciolite, uova di dinosauro, pietre preziose, animali impagliati o essiccati, fossili, coralli, farfalle multicolori e insetti esotici.

I prezzi non sono sempre popolari, ma nemmeno esorbitanti, e variano considerevolmente a seconda delle vostre esigenze. Comunque, se non volete spendere troppo, gli impiegati e i gestori del negozio, tutti accomunati dalla classica gentilezza newyorkese, saranno più che felici di impacchettarvi uno squalo sotto alcol (solo $29) o l’osso del pene di qualche mammifero ($6).

Sbucando con la metro all’East Village si entra in una dimensione totalmente diversa. Le foglie in questa stagione si fanno gialle e risaltano sulle pareti in mattoni e fra le scale antincendio esterne, che abbiamo visto in innumerevoli film. Qui, dalle parti di Cooper Union, c’è St. Mark’s Place, una stradina dedicata ai tatuaggi, ai piercing e all’abbigliamento punk e glam. Residuati della no-future generation, ormai cinquantenni ma ancora orgogliosamente imborchiati e dai (radi) capelli dipinti, gestiscono piccoli negozi di oggettistica e fashion. Anche se non siete tipi da creste e catene, vi consigliamo comunque di farvi un giro all’interno del negozio di vintage e usato Search & Destroy – se non altro per dare un’occhiata al delirante allestimento del negozio.

Qui i vestiti sono quasi nascosti da un’accozzaglia di giocattoli, props e collectibles: e se all’entrata siete salutati da bambole con la maschera antigas, modellini anatomici e feti deformi in gomma, all’interno i toni si fanno ancora più splatter. Un finto maiale sgozzato a grandezza naturale è appeso al soffitto, dal quale penzola anche un manichino fetish in posizione di bondage. Un flipper sta vicino a maschere di carnevale di mostri iperrealistici e sanguinosi. Ovunque manichini in pose oscene e, particolare non trascurabile, dalle parti genitali correttamente rappresentate. Purtroppo i gestori orientali sono (giustamente) gelosi del loro arredamento e ci permettono di scattare soltanto qualche foto.

Poco più avanti, sempre qui all’East Village, sulla decima strada, si trova uno dei negozi più celebri: si tratta di Obscura Antiques & Oddities.

Da quando Obscura è al centro di una serie televisiva di Discovery Channel (di cui vi avevamo parlato in questo articolo), il piccolo spazio espositivo è perennemente affollato. E la gente compra, il giro di affari è in stabile crescita e di conseguenza la collezione è in continuo cambiamento.

Obscura è l’analogo newyorkese del nostro Nautilus, anche se gli manca quella maniacale e coreografica cura espositiva che Alessandro ha donato alla sua bottega delle meraviglie. D’altronde Mike ci racconta che stanno per trasferirsi in uno spazio più grande, dove finalmente la collezione potrà evitare di essere accatastata e un po’ disordinata com’è adesso. Comunque sia, i pezzi sono davvero straordinari e l’atmosfera unica.

Fra tutti spicca la testa mummificata divenuta un po’ il simbolo di Obscura, tanto da farne delle minuscole repliche per portachiavi.

Ma le sorprese sono tante, e fra scheletri umani, strani animali, oggetti di antiquariato medico e bizzarrie in tutto e per tutto ascrivibili alla tradizione denominata Americana, si potrebbe perdere una buona oretta a curiosare.

Mike ed Evan, la strana coppia di proprietari, sono fra le persone più gentili e disponibili del mondo, talmente colti e appassionati che è una goduria anche solo rimanere ad ascoltarli mentre rispondono alle domande più stravaganti dei clienti. Il giro di collezionismo legato ad Obscura è impressionante, ma di certo anche voi riuscirete a trovare almeno un regalino per chi, fra i vostri conoscenti, ha già davvero tutto.

José Guadalupe Posada

José Posada è uno dei più celebri fra gli incisori messicani, e certamente precursore dei movimenti artistici e grafici nati dopo la rivoluzione del 1910. Nato ad Aguascalientes nel 1852, divenne presto maestro incisore e litografo, dapprima nella sua città natale, poi a Léon, e infine a Città del Messico.

Le sue prime opere sono praticamente impossibili da trovare, poiché vennero stampate sulla povera carta dei giornaletti sensazionalistici dell’epoca; le uniche copie rimanenti sono di proprietà di collezionisti privati, o esposte nei maggiori musei nazionali del Messico.

José Posada è celebre principalmente per le sue calaveras, icone prese a “prestito” dall’immaginario religioso e folkloristico messicano. “Reclutando” questi allegri e vitali scheletri per i suoi intenti satirici, Posada crea un originale affresco sociale, alla maniera dei famosi Capricci di Goya. Questa ironica danza macabra che non risparmia niente e nessuno è stata presa come vero e proprio manifesto da molti degli artisti messicani del ‘900.

L’innovazione posadiana è più complessa di quanto potrebbe sembrare a una prima occhiata. Da una parte, opera un connubio fra i teschi e gli scheletri che già erano presenti nell’iconografia precolombiana, e le rappresentazioni occidentali della morte di matrice cristiana (memento mori, danza macabra, ars moriendi, ecc.). Dall’altra, utilizza questi elementi per prendersi gioco, in maniera grottesca, dei valori borghesi, del progresso, delle differenze di classe. E, infine, pare ricordare comunque che, ricchi o poveri, potenti o sfruttati, non siamo nient’altro che ossa che camminano.

L’opera più famosa di José Posada è senza dubbio la Calavera Catrina. Questa nobildonna dall’imponente cappello all’ultima moda (ma ovviamente destinata, come tutti, a ritrovarsi scheletro) è divenuta nel tempo una delle più riconoscibili figure dell’immaginario messicano. Nel Giorno dei Morti vengono costruiti altari e dolci a forma di Calavera Catrina, e indossati costumi che ne ricordano le fattezze.

Posada, oltre che incisore, era anche vignettista; ancora oggi, il primo premio dell’Encuentro Internacional de Caricatura e Historieta (Incontro Internazionale di Cartoon e Fumetti) è chiamato “La Catrina”.

Speciale “Nautilus”

Se siete in viaggio, o abitate, a Torino, c’è una bottega che non potete mancare di visitare. Si tratta sicuramente del più incredibile negozio d’Italia, e lo scrittore David Sedaris si è spinto fino a definirlo addirittura “the greatest shop in the world“: è il “Nautilus”. Prende il suo nome dal mollusco omonimo, considerato un fossile vivente.

Appena entrati, dopo un’occhiata all’invitante vetrina, vi sembrerà di tornare indietro nel tempo e vi troverete immersi nella magia di un’antica wunderkammer. La collezione di oggetti d’epoca macabri e stravaganti affolla il piccolo locale (com’è giusto che sia: il gusto barocco dell’accumulo di dettagli vuole la sua parte).

Vi scoprirete quindi ad indugiare su centinaia di oggetti curiosi, principalmente strumenti medici e chirurgici di tempi andati, animali esotici impagliati, feti sotto formalina, calchi in gesso di teste deformi e maschere mortuarie, fossili, teschi, cartografie, cartelli e insegne d’epoca, mummie, scheletri, macchinari medici esoterici e teste frenologiche, maialini e vitelli siamesi. Un’imponente quantità di oggetti, ammassati in una sorta di folle museo della biologia e della tecnica, che cattura l’interesse dello scienziato così come del ricercatore del meraviglioso.

Il Nautilus collabora anche attivamente con il Museo Cesare Lombroso, recentemente aperto a Torino, che vi consigliamo di visitare. Il negozio è inoltre segnalato sul sito Atlas Obscura, vera e propria “mappatura” dei luoghi curiosi e dei posti incredibili nei quattro angoli del mondo.

Alessandro, uno dei due proprietari di questa invidiabile collezione, ha gentilmente accettato di parlarci di questa sua passione, concedendo a Bizzarro Bazar un’intervista in esclusiva che qui pubblichiamo.

Come è cominciata la tua passione per l’antiquariato medico e naturalistico?

La passione per il collezionismo l’ho avuta da sempre… collezionavo figurine, i tappi delle bottiglie, gli adesivi, fino ad impossessarmi della collezione di francobolli di mio papà (che però perse rapidamente di interesse non appena cessò l’alone di irrangiungibilità che la circondava). Da ragazzetto saccheggiavo regolarmente un mercatino dell’usato di qualsiasi carabattola, per la “gioia” di mia mamma, fino a quando iniziai a collezionare antichi ferri da stiro, mettendo insieme un’importante collezione… Ma fu il ritrovamento fortuito ad un mercatino di un vecchio stetoscopio di legno a far scattare la scintilla della passione per la storia della medicina e per gli antichi strumenti chirurgici, filone che ho approfondito in questi ultimi anni. Le pratiche più “cruente” sono quelle che hanno maggiormente acceso la mia fantasia: l’amputazione, la trapanazione cranica, il salasso… E proprio una sega da amputazione della fine del 1500, un vero pezzo da museo, è sicuramente uno dei pezzi della mia collezione che mi è stato più difficile cedere nel passato, ad un amico-cliente… ma fu la classica “proposta indecente” a cui non si poteva dire di no…

Dopo qualche anno di collezionismo “medico” ho conosciuto Fausto, mio socio e co-papà del Nautilus, grazie al quale piano piano ho esteso i miei campi di interesse, fino a spaziare in tutti gli aspetti della scienza e natura… e oltre.


Come è nata l’idea di aprire il Nautilus? A che tipo di clientela è rivolto il negozio?

Il Nautilus nasce sicuramente da un nostro sogno, dal poter avere la nostra personale wunderkammer in cui poter godere delle nostre collezioni in modo più compiuto, invece di doverle immaginare inscatolate in qualche buio garage… e allo stesso tempo dal desiderio di poterle condividere con altri appassionati.

La dimensione commerciale del Nautilus è parecchio “marginale”, per usare un eufemismo: la bottega è quasi sempre chiusa, abbiamo una tensione alla vendita bassissima, insomma, un disastro… ma non potrebbe essere diversamente, un collezionista per ovvi motivi è restio a fare il semplice commerciante.

I nostri clienti inizialmente erano collezionisti in senso “classico”: il medico che colleziona gli strumenti antichi del suo mestiere, l’appassionato di elettrostatica, il collezionista eccentrico che è fissato con i caschi protettivi industriali… Sempre più però questi scambi diventano marginali, perché cresce il numero di clienti che non collezionano in un ambito specifico, ma “semplicemente” si innamorano di un oggetto e lo ospitano nelle loro case. E non a caso sempre più i nostri clienti sono arredatori di interni alla ricerca di un pezzo “speciale” capace di nobilitare da solo un intero ambiente.


Il Nautilus non è semplicemente un negozio di antiquariato, ma una vera e propria wunderkammer. Qual è il senso, al giorno d’oggi, di assemblarne una?

In effetti sì, il riferimento nobile è quello della stanza delle meraviglie, riletta forse in chiave moderna, dove al posto del lusso principesco delle antiche collezioni possono trovare legittimità anche oggetti “umili” (mi vengono in mente ad esempio gli zoccoli dei contadini francesi per sgusciare le castagne, irte di speroni di ferro, notevoli e inconsapevoli opere dadaiste).

E penso che in un certo senso la wunderkammer risponda ad un desiderio molto primitivo e semplice dell’uomo, quello cioè di essere circondato da un contesto in cui si trova “bene”. Il perché poi una persona si senta più “a casa sua” in una stanza bianca completamente vuota piuttosto che in un antro traboccante anticaglie… beh, lascio agli psico-qualchecosa l’ardua interpretazione…


Il tuo è un interesse di tipo strettamente scientifico, o sei maggiormente attratto dall’aspetto “meraviglioso” della tua collezione? Quanto conta, cioè, il gusto del macabro e del bizzarro?

Quando sono in bottega e guardo la stratificazione di oggetti nel Nautilus l’unico filo conduttore che riesco a riconoscere e che lega in modo coerente questo coacervo è il senso della “meraviglia”, cioè lo stupore provato di fronte a ciascun oggetto a cui abbiamo dato ospitalità nelle nostre collezioni.

Certo, c’è il piacere imprescindibile della scoperta, c’è la valenza economica (in fondo è una passione diventata attività lavorativa), c’è il valore storico… eppure alla fine è quella sensazione che ti sottrae all’esperienza dell’”abituale” a legittimare un simile accumulo, cui talvolta guardo addirittura con sospetto, prospettandomi mille domande… Quindi sicuramente un debole per il bizzarro è presente… quello che invece non avverto è l’attrazione per il macabro, che non intravvedo nemmeno nei pezzi più “estremi” (come ad esempio i reperti anatomici in formalina, di cui naturalmente ben comprendo il potenziale macabro o morboso).


Quanto c’è di infantile nel collezionismo?

Il senso della meraviglia cui accennavo prima… mi piace molto la definizione del collezionista visto come “senex puerilis”, un “anziano fanciullo”. Forse chi l’ha formulata pensava di darle una connotazione leggermente spregiativa, io la trovo invece assolutamente azzeccata e gratificante. È come se contenesse la possibilità di godere allo stesso tempo di due dimensioni incompatibili, la saggezza spesso cinica dell’età matura e la capacità di stupirsi propria dell’infanzia… E in fondo il collezionista vive costantemente questa lotta contro il tempo che passa, a cui tenta di sottrarre i pezzi della sua collezione garantendo loro nuova vita – e cercando forse di conquistare anche per sé una certa sensazione di eternità…


Qual è il pezzo della collezione a cui sei più affezionato? Quale il più raro e/o costoso?

Ho avuto un periodo in cui ero parecchio intrigato dai modelli anatomici in cera, ed ho rastrellato buona parte della bibliografia disponibile sul tema, oltre a qualche bel modello. Sicuramente ci appassiona il tema della teratologia, con tutte le anomalie della natura: dai vitellini a due teste, agli agnellini siamesi (altra vendita molto rimpianta)… I campioni anatomici umani li trovo molto emozionanti, con il loro un affascinante senso di “vita sospesa”.

Il braccio della mummia è uno dei nostri beniamini, ma sono molto affezionato anche ad una piccola scultura francese di un gatto… quindi alla fine più che il valore o la rarità ciò che di solito rende “speciale” ai nostri occhi un pezzo è la storia che porta con sé, il viaggio o le circostanze che lo hanno portato fino a noi.  Poi arriva comunque sempre il giorno in cui sentiamo che il momento è arrivato, e finalmente possiamo lasciar andare l’oggetto difeso fino ad allora: c’è una gran soddisfazione nel veder brillare gli occhi del collezionista che ha appena conquistato un nuovo pezzo che tu hai scovato e accudito per un po’…


Ti capita di essere considerato “un tipo strano” per via della tua passione?

Talvolta, esagerando un po’, dico che il mondo si divide tra quelli che entrano dentro il Nautilus, e quelli che invece rimangono appiccicati con il naso davanti alla vetrina, ma poi alla fine se ne vanno con espressioni più o meno perplesse.

E quelli che entrano però giustamente si aspetterebbero un padrone di casa all’altezza, quantomeno un Igor guercio con la gobba, o il cugino del Gobbo di Notre-Dame, o almeno un freak sopravvissuto al circo Barnum… e quindi la mia presenza delude sempre un po’.

Mi chiedono spesso se non ho paura a stare in bottega, in mezzo a tutte quelle presenze inquietanti, ma me la cavo sempre molto facilmente dicendo che in realtà io ho paura quando esco fuori dalla bottega… per cui, al solito… chi sono i veri mostri e i veri “strani” ?

(Cliccate sulla foto qui sopra per vederla in alta definizione).

Il Nautilus si trova in via Bellezia 15/B a Torino. Apre su appuntamento, per informazioni o prenotazioni chiamate il 339 5342312.

Ecco il link al sito del Nautilus, ricco di numerose fotografie.

Ringraziamo Alessandro per la sua squisita cortesia.

Ringraziamo anche Stefano Bessoni, regista, fan del Nautilus, e autore delle foto contenute in questo articolo.