Grotta Gino: In The Lair of The Stone People

Article by guestbloggers Alessia Cagnotto and Martina Huni

It is a fine October day, the sky is clear and the sun warms us as if we were still at the beginning of September. We are in Moncalieri, in front of a building that seems to have been meticulously saved from the ravagings of time. The facade is uniformly illuminated; the decors and windows cast very soft shadows, and the Irish-green signs stand out against the salmon pink brick walls, as do the white letters reading “Ristorante La Grotta Gino“.
The entrance shows nothing strange, but we do not let ourselves be deceived by this normality: we know what awaits us inside is far from ordinary.

Upon entering the small bar, we are greeted by a smiling girl who shows us the way to the fairy-tale restaurant.
On our left we see a few set tables, surrounded by ancient pots and pans hanging from the walls, old tools and photographs: our gaze follows these objects unto the opening of the lair that will take us inside another world.
Here we see standing two dark red caryatids, guarding the entrance of the path, and beyond them, the reassuring plaster gives way to a dark grey stone vault, as our eyes wander inside the tunnel lit only by a few spotlights stuck to the ceiling.

Once past the caryatids of the Real World, in order to proceed inside the cave — as in all good adventures — we see a moored boat awaiting to set sail; we soon find ourselves floating on a path of uncertain waters, aboard our personal ferry. Feeling at ease in Jim Hawkins‘ shoes, we decide to enjoy the trip and focus on the statues lined up on both sides of the canal.

Behind a slight bend along the way (more or less 50 meters on a stream of spring water), we meet the first group of stone characters, among which is standing the builder of the cave himself, Mr. Lorenzo Gino, together with the Gentleman King and a chubby cupid holding an inscription dedicated to King Victor Emmanuel.

The story of the Grotta is incredible: over a span of thirty years, from 1855 to 1885, Lorenzo Gino excavated this place all by himself, on the pretext of expanding his carpenter shop. The construction works encountered many difficulties, as he proceeded without following any blueprint or architectural plan, but were nonetheless completed with this amazing result.
In 1902 his son Giovanni dedicated a bust, the one we just passed by, to his father and his efforts; many journalists attended the inauguration of this statue, and a couple of books were published to advertise the astounding Grotta Gino.

Back in the days, the public already looked with wonder at these improvised tunnels where Gino placed depictions of real characters, well-known at the time.
The light coming from above further sculpts the lineaments of the statues, making their eyes look deeper, and from those shady orbits these personified stones fiercely return our curious gaze.
Proceeding along the miniature canal, we eventually dock at a small circular widening. A bit sorry that the ride is already over, we get off the boat and take a look inside the dark niche opening before us: two mustached men emerge from darkness, accompanied by a loyal hunting dog holding a hare in her mouth.

We realize with amazement that we’ve just begun a new adventurous path; we climb a few steps and stumble upon another group of statues standing in circle: they happily dance under a skylight drilled in the vaulted ceiling, which lets some natural sunlight enter this dark space. These rays are so unexpected they seem almost magical.

New burrows branch off from here. On our right there’s a straight tunnel, where calm waters run, reflecting wine bottles and strange little petrified creatures nestled in the walls. The half-busts, some gentlemen as high as their top hats, and an elegant melancholic dame all lean out over the stream, where a bratty little kid is playfully splashing around.

We smile perhaps, feeling in the belly of a whale. Our estrangement is intensified by the eerie lighting: very colorful neons turn the stone red, blue, purple, so we observe the surroundings like a child watches the world through a colored candy paper. The only thing that could bring us back to the reality of the 21st Century would be the sound coming from the radio, but its discrete volume is not enough to break the spell, to shake the feeling that those creatures are looking at us, amused by our astonishment.

We make our way through the tunnels as if searching for a magic treasure chest, hypnotized by the smallest detail; everywhere wine bottles lie covered in dust, while human figures carved in stone seem to point us towards the right way. We enter a semi-circular lair, filled with a number of bottles; we observe them, label after label, as they tower over us arranged on several levels: the bottles decorate a series of recesses inhabited by little, bizarre smiling creatures leaning over towards us. In the middle of this sort of miniature porch, stands a young man of white stone, even more joyful than his roommates, forever bound to celebrate the wine around him.

We keep moving in order to reach a new group of statues: this time there are more characters, once again arranged in a circle — gentlemen sporting a big moustache and high top hats stand beside a playful young fellow and a well-dressed lady with her bulky outfit; the shadows of the fabric match the mistress’ hairstyle. In the dim light, these statues suggest a slight melancholy: we can recognize mankind’s everlasting attempt to sculpt Time itself, to carve in stone a particular instant, a vision that we wouldn’t want to be lost and consumed; a mission that is unfortunately bound to fail because, as the saying goes, “the memory of happiness is not happiness”.
Four a couple of minutes, though, we actually manage to join this Feast of Stone, we walk around the partygoers, following the whirl suggested by their frozen movements.
We eventually leave, in silence, like unwanted guests, without having understood the reason for this celebration.

The burrows take us towards a slight rise, the moist path turns into a stairway. We climb the stairs, accustomed by now to the impressive half-busts keeping us company through the last part of our adventure.


A narrow wrought-iron spiral staircase, green as the signs we met on the outside, leads us back to our current era. Its very presence contrasts with one last, small statue hanging on the opposite wall: a white, fleshy but run-down cupid remains motionless under a little window, sunlight brushing against him. From his niche, he is destined to imagine the world without ever knowing it.

Our trip eventually reaches its end as we enter a big circular dining room, under a high dome. This is the place where receptions and events are usually held.

The way back, which we reluctantly follow, gifts us with one last magical sight before getting our feet back on the ground: seen from our boat, the light coming from outisde, past the red caryatids, appears excessively bright and reverberates on the water creating a weird, oblong reflection, reminding us of depictions in ancient books of legends and fables.

Upon exiting this enchanted lair, and coming back to the Real World, we find the October day still tastes like the beginning of Spetember.
With a smile we silently thank Mr. Lorenzo Gino for digging his little fairy tale inside reality, and for giving substance, by means of stone, to a desire we all harbor: the chance of playing and dreaming again, for a while, just like when we were kids.
When we could turn the world into something magic, by looking at it through a sticky and colorful candy paper.

“La Grotta Gino” is in Piazza Amedeo Ferdinando 2, Moncalieri (TO). Here is its official website and FB page.
On the blog of the speleological association Egeria Centro Ricerche Sotterranee there is an article (in Italian) mentioning the mystery of a second Grotta Gino near Milan.
Take a look at the beautiful photographs taken by the authors of this post: Alessia Cagnotto and Martina Huni.

De profundis, mostra e booksigning

Keep The World Weird

Fra pochi giorni sarà finalmente disponibile il secondo volume della Collana Bizzarro Bazar. Intitolato De profundis, il libro esplora le suggestioni del Cimitero delle Fontanelle di Napoli portando il lettore faccia a faccia con le “capuzzelle” e il loro significato simbolico grazie alle fotografie di Carlo Vannini.

Logos Edizioni in collaborazione con Ateliers ViaDueGobbiTre, nell’ambito della manifestazione internazionale Fotografia Europea, ha organizzato una mostra fotografica che presenterà in esposizione i migliori scatti dei primi due volumi della Collana. All’evento, intitolato Keep The World Weird, ovviamente sarà presente anche il vostro affezionato Bizzarro Bazar, che aprirà le danze parlando della “meraviglia nera” e del suo potere sovversivo. L’appuntamento è per venerdì 15 maggio alle ore 19, presso l’atelier Laura Cadelo Bertrand in Via Due Gobbi, Reggio Emilia.

Keep The World Weird 3

Per i due giorni successivi, sabato 16 maggio e domenica 17 maggio, mi troverete intento a firmare e dedicare le copie di De profundis al Salone Internazionale del Libro di Torino, presso lo stand Logos. E per la gioia di grandi e piccini sarà anche possibile impadronirsi di un profluvio di golosi gadget (shopper, spille, magneti, cartoline, e chi più ne ha più ne metta); tutti accessori imprescindibili per ostentare con classe il vostro orgoglio weird!

Gadget

Per eventuali ulteriori aggiornamenti, ricordo che ora esiste anche la nostra pagina Facebook.

cartoline vert

Crucifixion workshop

I see before me crosses not all alike,
but differently made by different peoples:
some hang a man head downwards
,
some force a stick upwards through his groin,
some stretch out his arms on a forked gibbet.
I see cords, scourges,
and instruments of torture for each limb and each joint:
but I see Death also.
(Seneca, Consolatio ad Marciam, translated by Aubrey Stewart)

Vittore_Carpaccio_066

Easter is coming and, like every year, on Good Friday the believers will commemorate the Passion of Jesus, nailed to the wood on the Golgotha. Are we really sure that the traditional representation of Christ on the cross is realistic? After all, also in the endless variations of the punishment’s scene that art history has been producing for many centuries, there always seem to be some discrepancies: sometimes the nails are driven through the Redeemer’s hands and feet, sometimes through his wrists. This confusion goes back a long time ago, to the early, rough translations of the Gospel of John in which the Greek word for “limb” was misinterpreted as “hand“.

How exactly did the crucifixion take place? And what caused the death of the condemned person?
Both historian and scientists have tried to answer these questions.

Giotto,_Lower_Church_Assisi,_Crucifixion_01

Coeval sources lead to the assumption that the word “crucifixion” in Latin and Greek referred to different methods of execution, such as the impalement and the tying on a simple tree, and most likely these methods varied according to time and place.
The only thing we know for sure is that it was the most humiliating, long and painful punishment provided for by the judicial system at that time (at least in the Mediterranean Basin). Cicero himself defined it as “
the most cruel and sombre of all punishments“: the sufferings of the condemned person, hanged naked and exposed to public ridicule, were prolonged as much as possible by means of drugged drinks (myrrh and wine) or mixtures of water and vinegar which served to quench one’s thirst, stanch bleeding, revive and so on.
In rare cases death was accelerated. This happened to keep law and order, because some friend or relative of the condemned person had intervened, or according to specific local customs: the two methods most frequently used to put an end to the pain of the crucified were the spear thrust to the heart, that Jesus himself is traditionally believed to have received, and the so-called
crucifragium, namely the fracture of the legs by means of hammers or sticks, in order to take every support away from the condemned person, who choked because of the hyperextension of the ribcage.

Listener

Three kinds of crosses were used by Romans for judicial punishments at the time of Jesus: the crux decussata, or St Andrew’s cross, consisted of two stakes fastened to form a X; the crux commissa, with stakes forming a T-shape; the crux immissa, the most famous cross, in which the horizontal beam (patibulum) was placed at two-thirds of the length of the vertical one (stipes). This arrangement allowed to put up the so-called titulus, a notice including the personal details of the condemned person, the charge and the sentence.

Alcuni-aspetti-storici-della-crocifissione-romana

Another rather ascertained detail was the presence of a support half-way of the stipes, that was called sedile in Latin. It offered a support to the body of the condemned person, so that he/she could carry its weight without collapsing, thus preventing her/him from dying too fast. From sedile is apparently derived the phrase “to sit on the cross”. More complicated was the use of the suppedaneum, the support which the feet were nailed to and maybe rested on, often represented in paintings of the crucifixion but never mentioned in ancient manuscripts.

Listener-1

Although we now know many details about the cross itself, the methods of fastening were debated for a long time. The only skeleton ever found of a person condemned to crucifixion (discovered in 1968 around Jerusalem) had fractured legs and a nail into the outside of the ankle, which suggests that the feet were tied to the sides of the cross. But this doesn’t resolve the doubts that for many centuries have been tormenting theologians and believers. Where were the nails exactly driven? Through the hands or the wrists? Were the feet nailed to the front or to the sides of the stipes? Were the legs upright or bent at the knee?

6000567_orig

5543308_orig

It may seem strange but this matter was long debated also in the field of science, especially towards the end of the nineteenth century. Medical researchers could rely on a continuous supplying of corpses, and amputated arms and legs, to sieve different hypothesis.

The theory that the nails were driven through the wrists, precisely between carpus and radius, had the advantage that this method probably allowed to slice the thumb’s median nerve and long flexor tendon, but without affecting arteries nor fracturing bones. On the other side, the idea that the Redeemer had been nailed through the wrists was considered – if not exactly heretic – at least risky by a part of Christian scientists: it certainly meant to disprove most of the traditional representations, but there was much more at stake. The actual theological issue concerned the stigmata. If Jesus had been nailed through the wrists, how could we explain the wounds that invariably appeared on the palms of people in the odour of sanctity? Maybe Our Lord Himself (that used to inflict stigmata as a punishment, but also as a sign of blissfulness) didn’t know where the nails had been driven? To accept the wrists theory meant to admit that the stigmatized person had been more or less unconsciously influenced by a wrong iconography, and that the origin of the sores was anything but ultramundane…

In order to repress these ignominious assumptions, around 1900, Marie Louis Adolphe Donnadieu, professor at the Catholic Faculty of Sciences in Lyon, decided to try once and for all a true crucifixion. He nailed a corpse to a wooden board, and even by a single hand.

.

donnadieu

According to professor Donnadieu, the cruel photograph of the dead hanging by an arm, published in his Le Saint Suaire de Turin devant la Science (1904), undoubtedly proved that Jesus’ hands could support his body on the cross. The other scientists should recant their theories once and for all; Donnadieu’s only regret was not a moral one, but concerned the fact that “the light in the photograph didn’t offer the best aesthetic conditions“.

Unfortunately his dramatic demonstration didn’t silence opponents, not even in the ranks of the Catholic. Thirty years later doctor Pierre Barbet, first surgeon at the Paris Saint Joseph Hospital, criticized Donnadieu’s experiment in his text La passion de Jésus Christ selon le chirurgien (1936): “The picture shows a pathetic body, small, bony and emaciated. […] The corpse that I had crucified, instead […] was absolutely fresh and fleshy“. In fact, also Barbet had started to nail corpses, but in a more serious and programmatic way than Donnadieu.

 

image017-695x602

The meticulous research of Pierre Barbet undoubtedly includes him among the pioneers (they were few, to be pedantic) of medical studies about the Crucifixion, concerning in particular the wounds that marked the Shroud of Turin. Barbet came to the conclusion that the man represented on the Shroud had been nailed through the wrists and not the palms; that in the Shroud’s mark the thumb was missing because the median nerve had been cut off by the nail; that the man of the Shroud died of suffocation, when legs and arms were no more capable of supporting him.

8240982_orig

The last hypothesis, that was considered as the most reliable for many decades, was disproven by the last great expert in crucifixion, the famous American forensic pathologist and anthropologist Frederick Zugibe. He mainly studied between the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s. He didn’t have corpses to nail in his garage (as you can imagine, the vogue for crucifying corpses in order to investigate this kind of questions had definitely died out) and he carried out his researches thanks to a team of volunteers. Incidentally, to find these volunteers was easier than expected, because the members of a Christian congregation near his home queued up to play the role of the Saviour.
Zugibe built a handmade cross on which he tied his test subjects, constantly measuring their body functions – pressure, heartbeat, respiration, etcetera. He concluded that Jesus didn’t die of asphyxia, but of traumatic shock and hypovolemia.

zugibe

SV8-1

To complete the picture, other scholars assumed different causes of death for a crucified person: heart attack, acidosis, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, but also infections, dehydration, wounds caused by animals, or a combination of these factors. Whatever the ultimate cause, there was clearly only one way to get down off the cross.

Regarding the notorious nails and their entry wound, Zugibe believed that the upper part of the palm was perfectly capable to support the weight of the body, without causing bone fractures. He proved his theorem many times in the course of some dissections in the laboratory.

 

zugibe6

zugibe7

Then, after dozens of years, “an unbelievable and unexpected event, extremely meaningful, took place in the coroner’s office, confirming the existence of this passage [inside the hand]. A young woman had been brutally stabbed on her entire body. I found a defence wound on her hand, because she had raised it in the attempt to protect her face from the ferocious aggression. The examination of this wound on the hand proved that […] the blade had crossed the “Z” area and the point had gone out on the back of the wrist exactly as can be seen on the Shroud. A radiography of the area proved that there were no fractures at all!“.

zugibe8

The fact that a pathologist gets excited to the point of using an exclamation mark, during a murder victim autopsy, while thinking about the correlations between a stab, the Shroud of Turin and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ… well, this is not surprising in the slightest. After all, at stake here are a thousand years of religious imagery.

Croce1

The English new edition of the text by Pierre Barbet is A Doctor at Calvary. The conclusions of Zugibe are summed up in his essay Pierre Barbet Revisited, that can be consulted online.

Macabre collezioni

Abbiamo spesso parlato, su Bizzarro Bazar, di wunderkammer, esibizioni anatomiche, collezionisti del macabro e di oggetti conservati gelosamente nonostante il (o forse proprio a causa del) loro potenziale inquietante. È divertente notare come, nell’immaginario comune, chi si impegna in tale tipo di collezionismo sia normalmente associato alle tendenze dark o, peggio, sataniste; quando spesso si tratta di persone assolutamente comuni che mantengono intatto un quasi infantile senso della curiosità e della meraviglia.

Oggi, grazie a un articolo di Newsweek (segnalatoci da Materies Morbi) questo argomento poco battuto dalla stampa ci risolleva per un attimo dalla superficie di notizie e articoli insipidi quotidiani.

L’autrice dell’articolo, la scrittrice Caroline H. Dworin, si interroga sul perché certe persone provino attrazione verso reperti anatomici, feti sotto formalina, esemplari tassidermici deformi, strumenti chirurgici, o portafogli e antichi grimori rilegati in pelle umana. Alcune parti dell’articolo ci hanno toccato personalmente, visto che anche noi nel nostro piccolo collezioniamo da anni questo tipo di oggetti e reperti. E per una volta ci sembra che le ipotesi fornite dall’articolo siano condivisibili e soprattutto molto umane.

Nell’articolo, la simpatica Joanna Ebstein di Morbid Anatomy viene interpellata sulla sua esperienza come collezionista. Qualche tempo fa noi avevamo chiesto la stessa cosa anche al proprietario del favoloso Nautilus di Torino, e la sua risposta era stata analoga. Quello che attira in questi oggetti è il fatto che sono oggetti che parlano, hanno una storia, e ci interrogano. Sono cioè piccoli pezzi di vita fossilizzata che non possono lasciarci indifferenti. “C’è qualcosa di molto eccitante in simili oggetti, aprono così tante strade differenti: divengono oggetti con un significato”. Joanna sta anche portando avanti un progetto fotografico a lungo termine che documenta i “gabinetti delle meraviglie” privati e le collezioni segrete più incredibili attraverso il globo (Private Cabinets Photo Series).

“Le persone sono veramente attratte dalle cose che creano un ponte fra la vita e la morte”, dice Evan Michelson, proprietaria di Obscura, Antiques and Oddities, un piccolo negozio nell’East Village di New York specializzato in oggetti macabri vittoriani. “Se la tua personalità ha anche solo un’ombra di malinconia, finisci per trovare conforto in cose che altre persone trovano tristi”. Evan ha anche notato che le femmine sembrano essere attratte da questo tipo di collezione in proporzione largamente maggiore dei maschi. La sua collezione personale vanta molti oggetti “malinconici”, elementi di scene del crimine, strumenti medici, stampe di malattie e lesioni incurabili, preparati in barattolo, animali siamesi. “Ho alcuni cuccioli di maiale fusi assieme che sono davvero tristi – aggiunge – sembra che stiano danzando”.

Michelson fa anche collezione di bare per infanti. “Ho a casa mia una delle più piccole bare commerciali mai realizzate. Reca l’iscrizione Soffrite bambini per arrivare a Me. Ha le sue piccole cerniere, e i sostegni per i portatori, come se fossero stati realmente necessari dei portatori”.

Altri ancora trovano in questi oggetti una fonte di ispirazione artistica. Roald Dahl, l’autore di tante favole moderne per bambini, dopo un intervento chirurgico aveva conservato la testa del suo stesso femore, così come alcuni pezzi della sua spina dorsale in un barattolo. Lo aiutavano a meditare, e a scrivere.

“C’è molto poco, a questo mondo, che sia solo bianco o nero”. Così si esprime J. Bazzel, direttore delle comunicazioni del celebre Mütter Museum di Philadelphia, e racconta che nella immensa collezione anatomica del museo trovano posto diversi esemplari di cuoio umano. “Sentiamo parlare di cuoio umano, e subito pensiamo ai Nazisti – ma c’era un periodo in cui rilegare in pelle umana un testo scientifico o medico era un segno di rispetto. Magari un paziente aveva aiutato a scoprire una nuova conoscenza, a capire qualcosa di documentato in quel testo, e utilizzare la sua pelle era un modo di commemorarlo, onorarlo, e tributargli rispetto”. Seguendo questo ragionamento, lo stesso Bazzel, 38 anni, ha donato parte del suo corpo al museo: le sue ossa del bacino, rimosse chirurgicamente anni or sono a causa di uno sfibramento osseo dovuto alla reazione ad un farmaco utilizzato contro l’AIDS, di cui è affetto. Le ha donate al museo per testimoniare e insegnare ai visitatori quanto complessa e devastante la cura di questa sindrome possa risultare. “C’è molto poco a questo mondo, che sia bianco o nero… La paura di una persona è la gioia di un’altra; l’incubo di uno è la realtà di un altro”.

Speciale “Nautilus”

Se siete in viaggio, o abitate, a Torino, c’è una bottega che non potete mancare di visitare. Si tratta sicuramente del più incredibile negozio d’Italia, e lo scrittore David Sedaris si è spinto fino a definirlo addirittura “the greatest shop in the world“: è il “Nautilus”. Prende il suo nome dal mollusco omonimo, considerato un fossile vivente.

Appena entrati, dopo un’occhiata all’invitante vetrina, vi sembrerà di tornare indietro nel tempo e vi troverete immersi nella magia di un’antica wunderkammer. La collezione di oggetti d’epoca macabri e stravaganti affolla il piccolo locale (com’è giusto che sia: il gusto barocco dell’accumulo di dettagli vuole la sua parte).

Vi scoprirete quindi ad indugiare su centinaia di oggetti curiosi, principalmente strumenti medici e chirurgici di tempi andati, animali esotici impagliati, feti sotto formalina, calchi in gesso di teste deformi e maschere mortuarie, fossili, teschi, cartografie, cartelli e insegne d’epoca, mummie, scheletri, macchinari medici esoterici e teste frenologiche, maialini e vitelli siamesi. Un’imponente quantità di oggetti, ammassati in una sorta di folle museo della biologia e della tecnica, che cattura l’interesse dello scienziato così come del ricercatore del meraviglioso.

Il Nautilus collabora anche attivamente con il Museo Cesare Lombroso, recentemente aperto a Torino, che vi consigliamo di visitare. Il negozio è inoltre segnalato sul sito Atlas Obscura, vera e propria “mappatura” dei luoghi curiosi e dei posti incredibili nei quattro angoli del mondo.

Alessandro, uno dei due proprietari di questa invidiabile collezione, ha gentilmente accettato di parlarci di questa sua passione, concedendo a Bizzarro Bazar un’intervista in esclusiva che qui pubblichiamo.

Come è cominciata la tua passione per l’antiquariato medico e naturalistico?

La passione per il collezionismo l’ho avuta da sempre… collezionavo figurine, i tappi delle bottiglie, gli adesivi, fino ad impossessarmi della collezione di francobolli di mio papà (che però perse rapidamente di interesse non appena cessò l’alone di irrangiungibilità che la circondava). Da ragazzetto saccheggiavo regolarmente un mercatino dell’usato di qualsiasi carabattola, per la “gioia” di mia mamma, fino a quando iniziai a collezionare antichi ferri da stiro, mettendo insieme un’importante collezione… Ma fu il ritrovamento fortuito ad un mercatino di un vecchio stetoscopio di legno a far scattare la scintilla della passione per la storia della medicina e per gli antichi strumenti chirurgici, filone che ho approfondito in questi ultimi anni. Le pratiche più “cruente” sono quelle che hanno maggiormente acceso la mia fantasia: l’amputazione, la trapanazione cranica, il salasso… E proprio una sega da amputazione della fine del 1500, un vero pezzo da museo, è sicuramente uno dei pezzi della mia collezione che mi è stato più difficile cedere nel passato, ad un amico-cliente… ma fu la classica “proposta indecente” a cui non si poteva dire di no…

Dopo qualche anno di collezionismo “medico” ho conosciuto Fausto, mio socio e co-papà del Nautilus, grazie al quale piano piano ho esteso i miei campi di interesse, fino a spaziare in tutti gli aspetti della scienza e natura… e oltre.


Come è nata l’idea di aprire il Nautilus? A che tipo di clientela è rivolto il negozio?

Il Nautilus nasce sicuramente da un nostro sogno, dal poter avere la nostra personale wunderkammer in cui poter godere delle nostre collezioni in modo più compiuto, invece di doverle immaginare inscatolate in qualche buio garage… e allo stesso tempo dal desiderio di poterle condividere con altri appassionati.

La dimensione commerciale del Nautilus è parecchio “marginale”, per usare un eufemismo: la bottega è quasi sempre chiusa, abbiamo una tensione alla vendita bassissima, insomma, un disastro… ma non potrebbe essere diversamente, un collezionista per ovvi motivi è restio a fare il semplice commerciante.

I nostri clienti inizialmente erano collezionisti in senso “classico”: il medico che colleziona gli strumenti antichi del suo mestiere, l’appassionato di elettrostatica, il collezionista eccentrico che è fissato con i caschi protettivi industriali… Sempre più però questi scambi diventano marginali, perché cresce il numero di clienti che non collezionano in un ambito specifico, ma “semplicemente” si innamorano di un oggetto e lo ospitano nelle loro case. E non a caso sempre più i nostri clienti sono arredatori di interni alla ricerca di un pezzo “speciale” capace di nobilitare da solo un intero ambiente.


Il Nautilus non è semplicemente un negozio di antiquariato, ma una vera e propria wunderkammer. Qual è il senso, al giorno d’oggi, di assemblarne una?

In effetti sì, il riferimento nobile è quello della stanza delle meraviglie, riletta forse in chiave moderna, dove al posto del lusso principesco delle antiche collezioni possono trovare legittimità anche oggetti “umili” (mi vengono in mente ad esempio gli zoccoli dei contadini francesi per sgusciare le castagne, irte di speroni di ferro, notevoli e inconsapevoli opere dadaiste).

E penso che in un certo senso la wunderkammer risponda ad un desiderio molto primitivo e semplice dell’uomo, quello cioè di essere circondato da un contesto in cui si trova “bene”. Il perché poi una persona si senta più “a casa sua” in una stanza bianca completamente vuota piuttosto che in un antro traboccante anticaglie… beh, lascio agli psico-qualchecosa l’ardua interpretazione…


Il tuo è un interesse di tipo strettamente scientifico, o sei maggiormente attratto dall’aspetto “meraviglioso” della tua collezione? Quanto conta, cioè, il gusto del macabro e del bizzarro?

Quando sono in bottega e guardo la stratificazione di oggetti nel Nautilus l’unico filo conduttore che riesco a riconoscere e che lega in modo coerente questo coacervo è il senso della “meraviglia”, cioè lo stupore provato di fronte a ciascun oggetto a cui abbiamo dato ospitalità nelle nostre collezioni.

Certo, c’è il piacere imprescindibile della scoperta, c’è la valenza economica (in fondo è una passione diventata attività lavorativa), c’è il valore storico… eppure alla fine è quella sensazione che ti sottrae all’esperienza dell’”abituale” a legittimare un simile accumulo, cui talvolta guardo addirittura con sospetto, prospettandomi mille domande… Quindi sicuramente un debole per il bizzarro è presente… quello che invece non avverto è l’attrazione per il macabro, che non intravvedo nemmeno nei pezzi più “estremi” (come ad esempio i reperti anatomici in formalina, di cui naturalmente ben comprendo il potenziale macabro o morboso).


Quanto c’è di infantile nel collezionismo?

Il senso della meraviglia cui accennavo prima… mi piace molto la definizione del collezionista visto come “senex puerilis”, un “anziano fanciullo”. Forse chi l’ha formulata pensava di darle una connotazione leggermente spregiativa, io la trovo invece assolutamente azzeccata e gratificante. È come se contenesse la possibilità di godere allo stesso tempo di due dimensioni incompatibili, la saggezza spesso cinica dell’età matura e la capacità di stupirsi propria dell’infanzia… E in fondo il collezionista vive costantemente questa lotta contro il tempo che passa, a cui tenta di sottrarre i pezzi della sua collezione garantendo loro nuova vita – e cercando forse di conquistare anche per sé una certa sensazione di eternità…


Qual è il pezzo della collezione a cui sei più affezionato? Quale il più raro e/o costoso?

Ho avuto un periodo in cui ero parecchio intrigato dai modelli anatomici in cera, ed ho rastrellato buona parte della bibliografia disponibile sul tema, oltre a qualche bel modello. Sicuramente ci appassiona il tema della teratologia, con tutte le anomalie della natura: dai vitellini a due teste, agli agnellini siamesi (altra vendita molto rimpianta)… I campioni anatomici umani li trovo molto emozionanti, con il loro un affascinante senso di “vita sospesa”.

Il braccio della mummia è uno dei nostri beniamini, ma sono molto affezionato anche ad una piccola scultura francese di un gatto… quindi alla fine più che il valore o la rarità ciò che di solito rende “speciale” ai nostri occhi un pezzo è la storia che porta con sé, il viaggio o le circostanze che lo hanno portato fino a noi.  Poi arriva comunque sempre il giorno in cui sentiamo che il momento è arrivato, e finalmente possiamo lasciar andare l’oggetto difeso fino ad allora: c’è una gran soddisfazione nel veder brillare gli occhi del collezionista che ha appena conquistato un nuovo pezzo che tu hai scovato e accudito per un po’…


Ti capita di essere considerato “un tipo strano” per via della tua passione?

Talvolta, esagerando un po’, dico che il mondo si divide tra quelli che entrano dentro il Nautilus, e quelli che invece rimangono appiccicati con il naso davanti alla vetrina, ma poi alla fine se ne vanno con espressioni più o meno perplesse.

E quelli che entrano però giustamente si aspetterebbero un padrone di casa all’altezza, quantomeno un Igor guercio con la gobba, o il cugino del Gobbo di Notre-Dame, o almeno un freak sopravvissuto al circo Barnum… e quindi la mia presenza delude sempre un po’.

Mi chiedono spesso se non ho paura a stare in bottega, in mezzo a tutte quelle presenze inquietanti, ma me la cavo sempre molto facilmente dicendo che in realtà io ho paura quando esco fuori dalla bottega… per cui, al solito… chi sono i veri mostri e i veri “strani” ?

(Cliccate sulla foto qui sopra per vederla in alta definizione).

Il Nautilus si trova in via Bellezia 15/B a Torino. Apre su appuntamento, per informazioni o prenotazioni chiamate il 339 5342312.

Ecco il link al sito del Nautilus, ricco di numerose fotografie.

Ringraziamo Alessandro per la sua squisita cortesia.

Ringraziamo anche Stefano Bessoni, regista, fan del Nautilus, e autore delle foto contenute in questo articolo.

Musei anatomici 4: Roma, e oltre

Concludiamo il nostro giro turistico a caccia dei migliori musei anatomici italiani. Dopo Firenze, Napoli e Bologna visitiamo oggi le città di Roma, Siena, Modena, Torino, e Cagliari.

Museo Storico Nazionale dell’Arte Sanitaria – Roma


Il museo raccoglie strumenti dell’arte chirurgica, dell’ostetricia e della farmaceutica nonché testimonianze di molte malattie del passato. L’esposizione è allestita all’interno di una parte dell’Ospedale Santo Spirito e propone un percorso articolato in diversi e suggestivi ambienti seicenteschi. La Sala Alessandrina espone una raccolta di tavole anatomiche di inizio Ottocento realizzate da Antonio Serantony in collaborazione con l’anatomista Paolo Mascagni. Tra di esse va ricordata la stampa che raffigura una figura femminile con ventre sezionato e le raffigurazioni del Microcosmo, del Cervello e del Fegato, opere su tavola appartenute al chirurgo Guglielmo Riva. Ma forse la sala più interessante è la Sala Flajani, in cui sono conservate le collezioni appartenenti al più antico Museo Anatomico, ovvero la raccolta di preparati anatomo-patologici, in parte a secco e in parte in liquido, riguardanti malformazioni dello scheletro e dei vasi dovute a malattie, ora assai rare, come le lesioni delle ossa prodotte da malattie croniche come la sifilide.

La sala contiene inoltre la collezione delle cere ostetriche tardo settecentesche realizzate da Giovan Battista Manfredini con la supervisione scientifica dell’anatomista Carlo Mondini.

Museo Storico Nazionale dell’Arte Sanitaria

Lungotevere in Sassia, 3 (Ospedale S. Spirito) 00193 Roma

Orario: Lunedì, Mercoled’, Venerdì – 09:00-12:00

Entrata: libera.

Informazioni e prenotazioni:

Tel 06.6787864 – Fax 06.6991453

Museo Anatomico “Leonetto Comparini” – Siena

Situato all’interno del moderno Polo Didattico Scientifico San Miniato, offre un percorso all’interno di un ottocentesco Istituto di Anatomia Umana, del quale conserva gli arredi originali. Il Museo è stato ristrutturato nel 2001.

Accanto ai preparati anatomici essiccati con l’iniezione del mercurio metallico nei vasi linfatici secondo la tecnica operata dal Mascagni, il Museo Anatomico mette in mostra anche le tavole disegnate, i modelli in cera, le preparazioni microscopiche e le relative istoteche d’epoca, le collezioni osteologiche e tutta la strumentazione scientifica che si affianca ai ferri della dissezione: microscopi, microtomi dal taglio sottilissimo e perfetto, apparecchi da laboratorio e vetreria.

Nel Museo è collocata anche una collezione craniologia ottocentesca che riveste per provenienza e quantità un interesse scientifico eccezionale. Affiancano il museo due aule, attualmente utilizzate dagli studenti universitari per lo studio dell’anatomia macroscopica e microscopica.

Museo Anatomico Leonetto Comparini dell’Università degli Studi di Siena

Siena, loc. San Miniato, Via Aldo Moro

0577 234063 (segreteria); 0577 234064

Da lunedì a venerdì: 9.00-14.00 (con prenotazione); visitabile su richiesta sabato e

festivi: pomeriggio

Ingresso libero ad orario prestabilito

Museo di Storia Naturale dell’Accademia dei Fisiocritici – Siena

All’interno del Museo di Storia Naturale dell’Accademia dei Fisiocritici, a Siena, è conservata la collezione dedicata al patrimonio lasciato da Paolo Mascagni. Si tratta di circa 50 preparati anatomici umani disseccati nei cui vasi linfatici l’anatomico toscano Paolo Mascagni praticò l’iniezione con mercurio metallico.

Le preparazioni sono un numero limitato se si considera l’eccezionale mole di lavoro sviluppata da Mascagni nel corso della sua vita di studioso e di ricercatore e il fatto che, per il costume scientifico dell’epoca e l’oggetto delle ricerche, l’esecuzione di preparazioni destinate a essere conservate era la regola. Poche preparazioni sì, ma di inestimabile valore storico e scientifico, preziose anche come rara testimonianza di tecnica preparatoria e dissettoria.

Museo di Storia Naturale dell’Accademia dei Fisiocritici

Piazzetta Silvio Gigli 2 (Sant’Agostino) 53100 Siena

0577 47002 (0577 232940 per le visite guidate)

lunedì, martedì, mercoledì, venerdì: 9.00 – 13.00 e 15.00 – 18.00

giovedì: 9.00 – 13.00

Chiuso: sabato, domenica e festivi

Ingreso gratuito – visite guidate e laboratori didattici a temi diversi, gratuiti per

scolaresche e gruppi organizzati, la prenotazione è obbligatoria.

Museo Anatomico dell’Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia – Modena

Il Museo Anatomico di Modena contiene diverse eccezionali collezioni, e le sue 4 sale indagano in modo completo le diverse strutture anatomiche umane. Si comincia con i preparati osteologici, tra cui spiccano numerosi crani deformi o inusuali, scheletri teratologici e 49 scheletri di feti disposti in particolari atteggiamenti di vita quotidiana (ammonitore, di supplica, di comando ecc.) in conformità a quello che era il gusto preparatorio dell’epoca.


Di particolare interesse, inoltre, la raccolta etnografica di Paolo Gaddi, iniziata nel 1844, composta da crani appartenenti a individui delle diverse etnie umane, con 5 busti in cera, eseguiti dal ceroplasta modenese Remigio Lei, riproducenti le fattezze di un caucasico, un giapponese, un mongolo, un etiopico ed un beduino. Questa collezione fu, nel suo genere, la prima in Italia.


Il museo inoltre contiene tre donne mummificate, una preparata con bagno in sublimato corrosivo (risalente al 1841) e e le altre due in acido arsenioso (1834 e 1839).


Il museo ospita anche cere anatomiche, preparati a secco, per affumicamento, in formalina e in paraffina, di varie parti anatomiche: lingua, apparato digerente, urogenitale, preparati embriologici, apparato nervoso, pelle umana tatuata (secondo G. Lombroso il tatuaggio era da collegarsi con il livello di criminalità).


Si termina in “bellezza”, con la sezione dei preparati teratologici. Qui sono presentati esemplari animali e umani deformi.

La visita al Museo dovrebbe trovare un naturale completamento con l’osservazione dal ballatoio di quello che fu il Teatro Anatomico, progettato e realizzato da A. Scarpa a somiglianza di quello dell’Università di Padova: al momento purtroppo il Teatro è inagibile ma i lavori di restauro dovrebbero cominciare presto.


Museo Anatomico dell’Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia

viale Berengario, 14- 41100 Modena (Italy)

tel.(+39) 059 2057131 fax.(+39) 059 2057136

Museo di Anatomia Umana – Torino

Il Museo di Anatomia Umana di Torino ospita una collezione di preparati e cere anatomiche di grosso rilievo. La parte visitabile presenta illustrazioni mediche, preparati, scheletri e cere anatomiche.

Museo Anatomico dell’Università di Torino

Corso Massimo D’Azeglio, 52- 10126 Torino

Orari: dal lunedì al sabato, ore 10:00 – 18:00

tel.(+39) 011 6707883

Costo: 3 Euro.

Cittadella dei Musei – Cagliari

All’interno della Cittadella Universitaria dei Musei trova posto l’esposizione delle cere anatomiche di Clemente Susini. Questi modelli in cera, realizzati dal Susini durante le dissezioni cadaveriche operate dal prof. Francesco Boi, sono considerate fra le più belle al mondo. Il sito del museo ha anche una sezione interattiva che sottolinea le diverse parti anatomiche evidenziate dalle cere.

Cere Anatomiche di Clemente Susini dell’Università di Cagliari

Cittadella dei Musei,
Piazza Arsenale
Tel. 070.6757627

Orari:
dal martedì alla domenica:
9.00 – 13.00 / 16.00 – 19.00
Chiuso lunedì

ingresso € 1,55 intero; € 0,52 ridotto