The Perfect Tribe

This article originally appeared on #ILLUSTRATI n. 51 — Il Barone Rampante

© Markus Fleute

The Korowai people are the perfect tribe, because they are uncontaminated.
The first contact dates back to 1974, when about thirty natives where accosted by a team of anthropologists; it is assumed that until then the Korowai people were unaware of the existence of other populations beyond themselves. A few years later, the missionaries arrived to try and convert them.

The Korowai people are the perfect tribe, because they live in an exotic way.
Hidden in a forest’s corner in one of the most secluded countries—the isle of New Guinea—they build stilt houses on top of the trees. In this way they protect against insects, snakes, boars and enemies from other tribes. Over the years, their engineering skills have been shown in several documentaries: in 2011 an episode of Human Planet, produced by the BBC, detailed the construction of a house at the vertiginous height of 40 metres above the ground, and the move of a family to this new incredible dwelling.

The Korowai people are the perfect tribe, because they are cannibals.
They do not eat their enemies nor are into indiscriminate endocannibalism: they kill and devour only those who practice black magic.
When these people get an unknown disease, before dying they usually mention the name of the khakhua, the male witch who cast the curse on them. Then the relatives of the dead person capture the necromancer and chop him into pieces, distributing his meat among the village families.
In 2006 Paul Raffaele, an Australian adventure reporter and television personality, went among the Korowai people to save a little boy who was about to be cannibalized. The episode of 60 Minutes in which he recounted his expedition was watched by an extremely large audience. The intrepid reporter also wrote a report entitled “Sleeping With The Cannibals” for the prestigious Smithsonian Magazine; this article remains very popular to this day.

The Korowai people are the perfect tribe, because we still need the myth of the Savage.
We like to think that “out of time” tribes exist, crystallized in a prehistoric phase without experiencing any evolution or social transformation. This fable reassures us about our superiority, about our extraordinary capacity for progress. This is why we prefer the Savage to be naked, primitive, rude, or even animal-like, namely characterized by all those features we have abandoned.
Let us take the example of the tsantsa, the famous shrunken heads of the indios Shuar – Jibaros settled between Ecuador and Peru: before the arrival of white men, the natives sporadically produced very few of them. But Western explorers saw the tsantsa as the perfect macabre souvenir, and above all the emblem of the “primitive barbarity” of these tribes. It was only because of the growing demand for these artefacts that the Shuar and Achuar tribes started to organize raids among the neighbouring populations in order to stock up new heads, to shrunken and sell to white man in exchange for rifles.
When visiting museums of anthropology, only a few people realize that sometimes they are not at all looking at the artefacts from an ancient and faraway culture: they are admiring a fantasy, the idea of that culture created and built by Western people for themselves.

And what about the Korowai people, who live perched on trees like Tarzan?
In April this year, the BBC admitted that the house in the tree 40 metres above the ground, shown in the 2011 episode of Human Planet, was a fake.
Namely it was a sequence agreed upon with the natives, who were charged by the television crew of building a giant stilt house—which normally they wouldn’t have normally ever built. A member of the tribe declared that the house had been built “for the benefit of the producers of television shows overseas”: the traditional Korowai dwellings actually reached a maximum height of 5-10 metres above the ground.

© George Steinmetz

And the feasts with human meat?
Cannibalism as well hasn’t actually been practiced for countless decades. “Most of these groups have a ten-year experience in providing these stories [of cannibalism] to tourists” declared anthropologist Chris Ballard of the Australian National University.
Their life now depends on Western people driven to the jungle by their search for strong emotions. The Korowai people have learnt to give them what they want.
And if white people still need the Savage, here they are.

“Savage” heads

shrunken_heads

Enclosed in their display cases, unperturbed behind the glass, the heads attract yet another group of visitors.
They are watched, scrutinized, inspected in every smallest detail by a multitude of wide-open eyes. The children are in the front row, as usual, their noses pressed against the glass, their small faces suspended between a grimace of disgust and an excited, amazed look.
As for the adults, their wonder is somehow tarnished by judgment or, better, prejudice. “You have to understad that for these indigenous people it was a sacred practice”, sentences a nice gentleman, eager to prove his broad cultural views. “Still, it’s a horrible thing”, replies his wife, a little disgusted.
The scene repeats itself each and every day, for the heads sitting under the glass.
And few of the visitors understand they’re not actually looking at real objects from an ancient, distant culture. They are admiring a fantasy, the idea of that culture that Westerners have created and built.

Mokomokai14

The two basic kinds of heads presented in anthropological sections of museums all around the world are tsantsas and mokomokai.

The most famous tsantsas are the ones hailing from South America and created by the Jivaro peoples; among these tribes, the most prolific in fabricating such trophies were undoubtedly the Shuar and the Achuar, who lived between Ecuador and Peru.

Shrunken-head-pr

The Shuar technique for shrinking heads was complex: an incision was made from the nape to the top of the head; once completely skinned, after paying specific attention as to keep all the hair intact, the skull was discarded. The facial skin was then boiled. Any trace of soft tissue had to be eliminated by rolling red-hot pebbles inside the skin, which was then further scraped with hot sand, roasted on flat stones, and so on. It was a delicate and meticulous procedure, until eventually the head was reduced to one fourth of the original size.

What was the purpose of such dedication?
The tsantsas were part of solemn celebrations which lasted several years, and were meant to capture the extraordinary power of the victim’s soul. They were not actually war trophies, in spite of what you can sometimes read, because the Shuar and Achuar usually lived quite peacefully: the occasional raids organized by the various tribes to hunt for tsantsas were a form of socially accepted violence, as there was no purpose in it other than obtaining these very powerful objects.
Great feasts welcomed the return of the headhunters, and these celebrations were the most important in the whole year. The intrinsic power the tsantsas was transferred to the women, assuring wealth and plenty of food to the families. After seven years of rituals, the shrunken heads lost their force. For the Shuar, at this point, the tsantsas had no pratical value: some kept the heads as a keepsake, but others got rid of them without giving it a second thought. The focus was not the material object in itself, but its spiritual power.

That was not at all the case with Western merchants. To them, a shrunken head perfectly summarized the idea of a “savage culture”. These indigenous people, in the collective imaginary of the Nineteenth Century, were still depicted as brutal and animal-like: there was a will to think them as “stuck in time”, as if they had been lingering in a prehistoric underdeveloped stage, without ever undergoing evolutions or social transformations.
Therefore, what object could be a clearer symbol of these tribes’ barbarity than a macabre and grotesque souvenir like tsantsas?

If at the beginning of European settlements, in the Andes region and the Amazon River basin, the colonists had traded various tipes of goods with the indigenous people, as time went by they became ever more autonomous. As they did not need the pig or deer meat any more, which until then the Shuar had bartered with clothes, knives and guns, the settlers began to request only two things in exchange for the precious firearms: the indios’ labor force, and their infamous shrunken heads.
Soon enough, the only way a Shuar could get hold of a rifle was to sell a head.

That’s when the situation got worse, along with the exponential growth of Western fascination with tsantsas. The shrunken heads became a must-have curiosity for collectors and museums alike. The need for arms pushed the Shuar people to hunt heads for purposes which were not ritual any more, but rather exclusively commercial, in an attempt to satisfy the European request. A tsantsa for a gun, was the usual bargain: that gun would then be used to hunt more heads, exchanged for new arms… the vicious cycle ended up in a massacre, carried out to comply with foreigners’ tastes in exoticism.
As Frances Larson writes, “when visitors come to see the shrunken heads at the Pitt Rivers Museum, what they are really seeing is a story of the white man’s gun“.

The tsantsas lost their spiritual value, which had always been connected with the circulation of power inside the tribe, and became a tool for accumulating riches. Ironically, the settlers contributed to the creation of those cruel and unscrupulous headhunters they always expected to find.

The Shuar by then were killing indiscriminately, and without any ritual support, just to obtain new heads. They began making fake tsantsas, using the remains of women, children, even Westerners – confident that someone would surely fall for the scam.
In the second half of the ‘800, the commerce of tsantsas flourished so much that even peoples who had nothing to do with Jivaros and their traditions, began fabricating their own shrunken heads: in Colombia and Panama unclaimed bodies were stolen from the morgue, their heads given to helpful taxidermists. In other cases the heads of monkeys or sloths, and other animal skins, were used to produce convincing fakes.
Today nearly 80% of the tsantsas held in museums worldwide is estimated to be fake.

The history of New Zealand’s mokomokai followed an almost identical script.
Unlike tsantsas, for the Maori people these heads were actually war trophies, captured during inter-tribal battles. The heads were not shrunk, but preserved with their skull still inside. Brain, eyes and tongue were gouged, nostrils and orifices sealed with fibers and gum; then the heads were buried in hot stones, in order to steam-cook them and dry them out. The mokomokai were meant to be exposed around the chief’s house.

In the second half of ‘700, naturalist Joseph Banks, sailing with James Cook, was the first European to acquire a similar head, after convincing an elderly man at a village to part from it – thanks to his eloquence, and to a musket pointed at the old man’s face. In all the following trips, Cook’s company spotted only a pair of mokomokai, a clue suggesting that these objects were in fact pretty uncommon.

Yet, after just fifty years, the commerce of heads in New Zealand had reached such intensity that many believed the Maori would be totally annihilated. Here too, the heads were traded for guns, in a spiral of violence that seriously threatened the indigenous population, particularly during the so-called Musket Wars.

Collectors were mainly attracted by the intricate tā moko (carved tattoos) which adorned the chiefs’ faces with elegant and sinuous spirals. So, Maori chiefs began tattooing their slaves just before beheading them – in some cases giving the Western buyer the option to choose a favorite head, while the unlucky owner was still alive; they tattoed heads that had already been cut, just to raise their price. The tā moko, a decorative art form of ancient origin, ended up been emptied of all meaning related to courage, honor or social status.
In New Zealand, even Europeans began to get killed, to have their heads tattoed and sold to their unsuspecting fellow countrymen: a fraud not devoid of a certain amount of  black humor.

Trading mokomokai was outlawed in 1831; the import of tsantas from South America was only banned from 1940.

So, in displays of ethnic artifacts in museums around the globe, in those darkened exotic heads, one is able to contemplate not only an ancient ritual object, packed with symbols and meanings: it is almost possible to glimpse at the very moment in which those meanings and symbols vanished forever.

Mokomokai4

Tsantsas and mokomokai are difficult, controversial, problematic objects.
Among the visitors, it is easy to find someone who feels outraged by an indigenous practice which by today’s standards seems cruel; after reading this article, maybe some reader will be disgusted by the hypocrisy of Westerners, who were condemning the savage headhunters while coveting the heads, and looking forward to put them on display in their homes.
Either way, one feels indignant: as if this peculiar fascination did not really affect us… as if our entire western culture did not come from a very long tradition of heads cut off and exposed on poles, on city walls and in public places.
But the beheadings never stopped existing, just as the human head never ceased to be a very powerful and magnetic symbol, both shocking and irresistibly hypnotizing.

Most of the information in this article, as well as the inspiration for it, comes from the brilliant Severed by Frances Larson, a book on the cultural and antrhopological significance of severed heads.

On the Midway

Abbiamo spesso parlato dei sideshow e dei luna-park itineranti che si spostavano di città in città attraversando l’America e l’Europa, assieme ai circhi, all’inizio del secolo scorso. Ma cosa proponevano, oltre allo zucchero filato, al tiro al bersaglio, a qualche ruota panoramica e alle meraviglie umane?
In realtà l’offerta di intrattenimenti e di spettacoli all’interno di un sideshow era estremamente diversificata, e comprendeva alcuni show che sono via via scomparsi dal repertorio delle fiere itineranti. Questo articolo scorre brevemente alcune delle attrazioni più sorprendenti dei sideshow americani.

Step right up! Fatevi sotto signore e signori, preparate il biglietto, fatelo timbrare da Hank, il Nano più alto del mondo, ed entrate sulla midway!


All’interno del luna-park, i vari stand e le attrazioni erano normalmente disposti a ferro di cavallo, lasciando un unico grande corridoio centrale in cui si aggirava liberamente il pubblico: la midway, appunto. Su questa “via di mezzo” si affacciavano i bally, le pedane da cui gli imbonitori attiravano l’attenzione con voce stentorea, ipnotica parlantina e indubbio carisma; talvolta si poteva avere una piccola anticipazione di ciò che c’era da aspettarsi, una volta entrati per un quarto di dollaro. Di fianco al signore che pubblicizzava il freakshow, ad esempio, poteva stare seduta la donna barbuta, come “assaggio” dello spettacolo vero e proprio.
A sentire l’imbonitore, ogni spettacolo era il più incredibile evento che occhio umano avesse mai veduto – per questo il termine ballyhoo rimane tutt’oggi nell’uso comune con il significato di pubblicità sensazionalistica ed ingannevole.


Aggirandosi fra gli schiamazzi, la musica di calliope e i colori della midway, si poteva essere incuriositi dalle ultime “danze elettriche”: ballerine i cui abiti si illuminavano magicamente, emanando incredibili raggi di luce… il trucco stava nel fatto che l’abito della performer era completamente bianco, e un riflettore disegnava pattern e fantasie sul suo corpo, mentre danzava. Con l’arrivo dei primissimi proiettori cinematografici, l’idea divenne sempre più elaborata e spettacolare: nel 1899 George La Rose presentò il La Rose’s Electric Fountain Show, che era descritto come

una stupefacente combinazione di Arte, Bellezza e Scienza. Lo show è l’unico al mondo equipaggiato con un grande palco girevole che si alza dall’interno di una fontana. Nel turbinare dell’acqua stanno alcune selezionate artiste che si producono in gruppi statuari, danze illuminate, danze fotografiche e riproduzioni dal vivo dei più raffinati soggetti.

Lo show contava su effetti scenici, cinematografici e si chiudeva con l’eruzione del vulcano Pelée.

L’affascinante e tenebroso esotismo delle tribù “primitive” non passava mai di moda. Ecco quindi i Musei delle Mummie (in realtà minuscoli spazi ricavati all’interno di un carrozzone) che proponevano le tsantsa, teste rimpicciolite degli indios Jivaro, e stravaganze mummificate sempre più fantasiose. Si trattava, ovviamente, di sideshow gaff, ovvero di reperti falsificati ad arte (ne abbiamo parlato in questo articolo) da modellatori e scultori piuttosto abili.

Uno dei migliori in questo campo era certamente William Nelson, proprietario della Nelson Supply House con cui vendeva ai circhi “curiosità mummificate”. Fra le finte mummie offerte a inizio secolo da Nelson, c’erano il leggendario gigante della Patagonia a due teste, King Mac-A-Dula; King Jack-a-Loo-Pa, che secondo la descrizione avrebbe avuto una testa, tre volti, tre mani, tre braccia, tre dita, tre gambe, tre piedi e tre dita dei piedi; il fantastico Poly-Moo-Zuke, creatura a sei gambe; il Grande Cavalluccio Marino, ricavato a partire da un vero teschio di cavallo, la cui coda si divideva in due lunghe pinne munite di zoccoli; mummie egiziane di vario tipo, come ad esempio Labow, il “Doppio Ragazzo Egiziano con Sorella che gli Cresce sul Petto”.

Più avanti la cartapesta verrà soppiantata dalla gomma, con cui si creeranno i finti feti deformi sotto liquido, e dalla cera: nel decennio successivo alla Seconda Guerra, famose attrazioni includevano il cervello di Hitler sotto formalina, e riproduzioni del cadavere del Führer.


Altri classici spettacoli erano le esibizioni di torture. Pubblicizzati dai banner con toni grandguignoleschi, erano in realtà delle ricostruzioni con rozzi manichini che lasciavano sempre un po’ l’amaro in bocca, rispetto alle raffinate crudeltà annunciate. Ma con il tempo anche i walk-through show ampliarono l’offerta, anche sulla scia dei vari successi del cinema noir: ecco quindi che si poteva esplorare i torbidi scenari della prostituzione, delle gambling house in cui loschi figuri giocavano d’azzardo, scene di droga ambientate nelle Chinatown delle grandi città americane, dove mangiatori d’oppio stavano accasciati sulle squallide brandine.

La curiosità per il fosco mondo della malavita stava anche alla base delle attrazioni che promettevano di mostrare straordinari reperti dalle scene del crimine: la gente pagava volentieri la moneta d’entrata per poter ammirare l’automobile in cui vennero uccisi Bonnie e Clyde, su cui erano visibili i fori di proiettile causati dallo scontro a fuoco con le forze dell’ordine. Peccato che quasi ogni sideshow avesse la sua “autentica” macchina di Bonnie e Clyde, così come circolavano decine di Cadillac che sarebbero appartenute ad Al Capone o ad altri famigerati gangster. Anzi, crivellare di colpi una macchina e tentare di venderla al circo poteva rivelarsi un buon affare, come dimostrano le inserzioni dell’epoca.

Nulla, però, fermava le folle come il frastuono delle moto che giravano a tutto gas nel motodromo.
Evoluzione di quelli progettati per le biciclette, già in circolazione dalla metà dell’800, i motodromi con pareti inclinate lasciarono il posto a loro volta ai silodrome, detti anche Wall of Death, con pareti verticali. Assistere a questi spettacoli, dal bordo del “pozzo”, era una vera e propria esperienza adrenalinica, che attaccava tutti i sensi contemporaneamente con l’odore della benzina, il rumore dei motori, le motociclette che sfrecciavano a pochi centimetri dal pubblico e gli scossoni dell’intera struttura in legno, vibrante sotto la potenza di questi temerari centauri. Con lo sviluppo della tecnologia, anche le auto da corsa avranno i loro spettacoli in autodromi verticali; e, per aggiungere un po’ di pepe al tutto, si cominceranno a inserire stunt ancora più impressionanti, come ad esempio l’inseguimento dei leoni (lion chase) che, in alcune varianti, vengono addirittura fatti salire a bordo delle auto che sfrecciano in tondo (lion race).

Ogni sideshow aveva i suoi live act con artisti eclettici: mangiaspade, giocolieri, buttafuoco, fachiri, lanciatori di coltelli, trampolieri, uomini forzuti e stuntman di grande originalità. Ma l’idea davvero affascinante, in retrospettiva, è l’evidente consapevolezza che qualsiasi cosa potesse costituire uno spettacolo, se ben pubblicizzato: dalla ricostruzione dell’Ultima Cena si Gesù, ai primi “polmoni d’acciaio” di cui si faceva un gran parlare, dai domatori di leoni alle gare di scimmie nelle loro minuscole macchinine.


Certo, il principio di Barnum — “ogni minuto nasce un nuovo allocco” — era sempre valido, e una buona parte di questi show possono essere visti oggi come ingannevoli trappole mangiasoldi, studiate appositamente per il pubblico rurale e poco istruito. Eppure si può intuire che, al di là del business, il fulcro su cui faceva leva il sideshow era la più ingenua e pura meraviglia.

Molti lo ricordano ancora: l’arrivo dei carrozzoni del circo, con la musica, le luci colorate e la promessa di visioni incredibili e magiche, per la popolazione dei piccoli villaggi era un vero e proprio evento, l’irruzione del fantastico nella quotidiana routine della fatica. E allora sì, anche se qualche dime era speso a vanvera, a fine serata si tornava a casa consci che quelle quattro mura non erano tutto: il circo regalava la sensazione di vivere in un mondo diverso. Un mondo esotico, sconosciuto, popolato da persone stravaganti e pittoresche. Un mondo in cui poteva accadere l’impossibile.

Gran parte delle immagini è tratta da A. W. Stencell, Seeing Is Believing: America’s Sideshows.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Robert Ripley

Una vita alla ricerca del bizzarro

Nato nel 1890, Robert Ripley aveva cominciato la sua carriera come fumettista, collaborando ad alcune strisce del New York Globe. All’età di 29 anni fece il suo primo viaggio intorno al mondo, e tornò completamente cambiato: la scoperta di culture differenti, località ed usanze esotiche l’aveva talmente intrigato che decise di dedicare la sua vita alla ricerca del bizzarro e dell’inusitato.


Così cambiò il titolo della sua striscia in Believe It Or Not! (“Che ci crediate o no!”), e attraverso i fumetti cominciò a raccontare le più strane e incredibili storie provenienti da tutto il mondo e ad illustrare i prodigi della natura meno conosciuti.


Il successo della rubrica crebbe vertiginosamente durante tutti gli anni ’20, e Ripley divenne presto una delle figure pubbliche più famose e conosciute; ma dietro a questo eclatante risultato c’era un altro uomo, che restò per sempre nell’ombra.

Infatti Ripley, deciso ad essere il più attendibile possibile, nel 1923 ingaggiò Norbert Pearlroth perché si occupasse della ricerca. Quest’uomo era uno studioso eccezionale e di sicuro uno dei maggiori artefici del successo della rubrica.

Norbert parlava 11 lingue, e lavorava 10 ore al giorno per sei giorni alla settimana restando chiuso nella sala di lettura della New York Public Library: si stima che abbia esaminato 7000 libri all’anno, rimanendo a lavorare nello staff di Believe It Or Not fino al 1975, leggendo un totale di più di 350.000 libri. Da contratto, doveva riuscire a trovare ogni settimana esattamente 24 curiosità da inserire nella rubrica, e lavorò praticamente in completo anonimato per tutta la sua vita.


Nel frattempo Ripley aveva stretto una collaborazione con il magnate della stampa William Hearst (quello a cui faceva il verso Orson Welles in Quarto potere, per intenderci), che aveva deciso di finanziare i suoi celebri viaggi attorno al mondo alla ricerca di stranezze e pezzi rari da collezione. Nel 1930 Believe It Or Not sbarcò alla radio, con uno show che sarebbe durato per 14 anni. Il pubblico cominciò a inviare migliaia di segnalazioni alla redazione, spesso raccontando di storie bizzarre accadute nel proprio circondario; le testimonianze erano tutte soppesate e verificate accuratamente (spesso da Pearlroth in persona) prima di venire pubblicate. Con i suoi 18 milioni di lettori in tutto il mondo, Ripley riceveva circa 3000 lettere alla settimana, tanto che si dice che la sua posta superasse per volume quella della Casa Bianca.


La popolarità di Ripley era alle stelle: la Warner Bros produsse perfino una dozzina di cortometraggi Believe It Or Not da proiettare prima dei film, nelle sale cinematografiche. Nel 1932 Ripley ha visitato ben 201 paesi del mondo. Decide allora di mettere in mostra l’impressionante quantità di stranezze che ha accumulato in tutti quei viaggi, ed apre il primo Odditorium a Chicago. Vi espone, fra vitelli a due teste impagliati, strumenti di tortura e feticci esotici, anche la sua collezione di tsantsa (le teste dei nemici “ristrette” dagli indios dell’Amazzonia) che è la più grande del mondo. Per metà wunderkammer e per metà sideshow, sospeso in un limbo sempre in bilico fra l’accuratezza di un antropologo culturale e la faccia tosta dell’imbonitore da fiera, l’Odditorium ha un immediato successo e in meno di 8 anni Ripley ne apre altri cinque in varie città degli Stati Uniti.


Durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale Ripley smette di viaggiare e si dedica a opere di carità. Nel dopoguerra però torna alla carica con una mossa azzardata ma lungimirante: punta tutto sulla neonata televisione, e trasferisce il programma radiofonico su piccolo schermo, inaugurando la serie tv di Believe It Or Not. Fa in tempo a registrare 13 episodi, prima di morire per cancro nel 1949.


Oggi la franchise Believe It Or Not conta 32 musei in tutto il mondo (Bizzarro Bazar ha visitato quello di New York, in questo articolo), e la Ripley Entertainment Inc. è un colosso dell’intrattenimento: oltre a decine di parchi di divertimento, detiene a sua volta le franchise di Madame Tussauds e delle attrazioni relative al Guinness dei Primati. Con il marchio Ripley vengono pubblicati libri, calendari, poster, videogame, trasmissioni televisive… e, ancora oggi, la famosa striscia a fumetti da cui tutto ebbe inizio.