Macabre Masks

The Templo Mayor, built between 1337 and 1487, was the political and religious heart of Tenochtitlán, the city-state in Valley of Mexico that became the capital of the Aztec empire starting from the 15th Century.
Since its remains were accidentally discovered in 1978, during the excavations for Mexico City’s subway, archeologists have unearthed close to 80 ceremonial buildings and an extraordinary number of manufacts from the Aztec (Mexica) civilization.

Among the most peculiar findings, there are some masks created from human skulls.
These masks are quite elaborate: the back of the skull was removed, probably in order to wear them or apply them to a headgear; the masks were colored with dye; flint blades and other decorations were inserted into the eye sockets and nostrils.

In 2016 a team of anthropologists from the University of Montana conducted an experimental research on eight of these masks, comparing them with twenty non-modified skulls found on the same site, in order to learn their sex, age at death, possible diseases and life styles. The results showed that the skull masks belonged to male individuals, 30 to 45-years old, with particularly good teeth, indicating above-average health. From the denture’s shape the anthropologists even inferred that these men came from faraway locations: Toluca Valley, Western Mexico, the Gulf coast and other Aztec towns in the Valley of Mexico. Therefore the skulls very likely belonged to prisoners of noble origins, excellently nourished and lacking any pathologies.

Human sacrifices at the Templo Mayor, for which the Aztecs are sadly known, were a spectacle that could entail different procedures: sometimes the victims were executed by beheading, sometimes through the extraction of the heart, or burned, or challenged to deathly combats.
The masks were produced from the bodies of sacrified warriors; wearing them must have had a highly symbolic value.

If these items survived the ravages of time, it’s because they’re made of bones. But there existed other, more unsettling disguises that have been inevitably lost: the masks made from the flayed skin of a sacrified enemy’s face.

The conquistador Bernal Díaz del Castillo described these skin masks as tanned to look “like glove leather” and said that they were worn during celebrations of military victories. Other masks, made of human skin, were displayed as offerings on temple altars, just as a number of the skull masks, reanimated by shell and stone eyeballs, noses, and tongues, were buried in offerings at the Templo Mayor. Because a defeated enemy’s former powers were believed to be embedded in his skin and bones, masks made of his relics not only transferred his powers to the new owner but could serve as worthy offerings to the god as well.

(Cecelia F. Klein, Aztec Masks, in Mexicolore, September 2012)

During a month-long ceremony called Tlacaxiphualiztli, “the Flaying of Men”, the skin of sacrified prisoners was peeled off and worn for twenty days to celebrate the war god Xipe Totec. The iconography portrays this god clothed in human skin.

Such masks, wether made of bone or of skin, have a much deeper meaning than the ritual itself. They play an important role in establishing identity:

In Aztec society a warrior who killed his first captive was said to ‘assume another face.’ Regardless of whether this expression referred literally to a trophy mask or was simply a figure of speech, it implies that the youth’s new “face” represented a new social identity or status. Aztec masks therefore must be understood as revelations, or signs, of a person’s special status rather than as disguises […]. In Nahuatl, the language spoken by the Aztecs, the word for face, xayacatl, is the same word used to refer to something that covers the face.

(Cecelia F. Klein, Ibid.)

Here is the interesting point: there’s not a single culture in the whole world which hasn’t elaborated its own masks, and they very rarely are simple disguises.
Their purpose is “the development of personality […], or more accurately, the development of the person [which] is a question of magical prestige“: the masks “are actually used among primitives in in totem ceremonies, for instance, as a means of enhancing or changing the personality” (Carl Gustav Jung, The Ego and the Uncoscious, 1928, p. 155).

Much in the same way, the decorated skulls of Templo Mayor are not so “exotic” as we might like to imagine. These manufacts are but a different declination of ideas we are quite familiar with — ideas that are at the very core of our own society.

The relationship between the face (our identity and individuality) and the mask we wear, is a very ancient paradox. Just like for the Aztecs the term xayacatl could indicate both the mask and the face, for us too they are often indistinguishable.

The very word person comes from the Latin “per-sonare”, “to resound through”: it’s the voice of the actor behind his mask.
Greek tragedy was born between the 7th and 5th century BCE, a representation that essentialy a substitute for human sacrifices, as Réné Girard affirmed. One of the most recognized etimologies tells us that tragedy is actually the song of the scapgoat: an imitation of the ritual killing of the “internal stranger” on the altar, of the bloody spectacle with which society cleansed itself, and washed away its most impure, primiteve urges. Tragedy plays – which Athenians were obligated to attend by law, during Dionysus celebrations – substituted the ancestral violence of the sacrifice with its representation, and the scapegoat with the tragic hero.

Thus the theater, in the beginning, was conflict and catharsis. A duel between the Barbarian, who knows no language and acts through natural instinct, and the Citizen, the son of order and logos.
Theater, just like human sacrifice, created cultural identity; the Mask creates the person needed for the mise-en-scene of this identity, forming and regulating social interactions.

The human sacrifices of the ancient Greeks and of the Aztec both met the same need: cultural identity is born (or at least reinforced) by contrast with the adversary, offered and killed on the altar.
Reducing the enemy to a skull — as the Aztecs did with the tzompantli, the terrible racks used to exhibit dozens, maybe hundreds of sacrifice victims skulls — is a way of depriving him of his mask/face, of annihilating his identity. Here are the enemies, all alike, just bleached bones under the sun, with no individual quality whatsoever.

But turning these skulls into masks, or wearing the enemy’s skin, implies a tough work, and therefore means performing an even more conscious magical act: it serves the purpose of acquiring his strength and power, but also of reasserting that the person (and, by extension, society) only exists because of the Stranger it was able to defeat.

The Devil and the Seven Dwarfs

A pale sun just came up that morning, when a soldier came knocking at the Angel’s door. He would never have disturbed his sleep, if he wasn’t sure to bring him a tryly exceptional discovery. Once he heardthe news, the Angel dressed up quickly and rushed towards the gates, his eyes burning with anticipation
It was May 19, 1944, in Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Josef Mengele was about to meet the largest all-dwarf family ever recorded.

The Ovitz family originated from Rozavlea, a village in the district of Maramureș, Transilvania (Romania). Their patriarch was the itinerant rabbi Shimson Eizik Ovitz, who sufferd from pseudoachondroplasia, a form of dwarfism; over two marriages, he had ten children, seven of which were stricken by his same genetic condition. Five of them were female, two males.
Dwarfism made them unfit for heavy work: how could they solve the paradox of having such a large family with virtually no labor force? The Ovitzs decided to stick together as much as possible, and they embarked in the only activity that could grant them a decent life: entertainment.

They founded the “Lilliput Troupe”, a traveling show in which only the seven dwarf siblings performed onstage; the other, medium-height members of the family warked backstage, writing sketches, preparing costumes or managing their next gigs. Their two-hour show mainly consisted of musical numbers, in which the family covered popular hits of the day on especially tailored instruments (small guitars, violas, violins, accordeons). For 15 years they toured Central Europe with huge success, the only all-dwarf act in the history of entertainment, until Nazism’s dark shadow reached them.

bc63cece7552787a28a6f49891a1c2db

f3e1279f2123dcce84193738bac38f73

8524100000000000

In theory, the Ovitzs were bound to die. First of all because they were observant Jews; and secondly, because they were considered “malformed” and, according to the Aktion T4 euthanasia program their lives were “unworthy of life” (Lebensunwertes Leben). At the time of their arrival in Auschwitz, they were twelve. The youngest was a 18-months-old child.

WP_Josef_Mengele_1956

Josef Mengele, nicknamed the “Angel of Death” (Todesengel), still remains one of the most sadly infamous figures in those unimaginable years of terror. In the tales of the survivors, he is without doubt the most enigmatic and unsettling character: a cultivated and elegant man, with doctorates received in anthropology and medecine, fascinating as a Hollywood star, Mengele possessed another face, one of violence and cruelty which could burst out in a totally disinhibited way. According to some accounts, he could bring sugar to the children in the nomad camp, play the violin for them, and shortly after inject them with chloroform on the operation table or personally carry out a mass execution. As the camp’s physician, he often began his day by staning on the platform and selecting with a gesture of his hand who among the newly arrived deportees was fit to work and who was destined to be eliminated in the gas chambers.

He was known for his obsession with twins, who according to his studies and those of his mentor Otmar von Verschuer (who was well-informed about his pupil’s activities) could undisclose the ultimate secrets of eugenics. Mengele carried out human experiments of unprecedented sadism, infecting healthy individuals with various diseases, dissecting live patients without anesthesia, injecting ink into their eyes in order to make them more “aryan-looking”, experimenting poisons and burning genitals with acid. Mengele was not a mad scientist, operating under cover, as was first understood, but was backed by the elite of German scientific community: under the Third Reich, these scientists enjoyed an uncommon freedom, as long as they proved their research was going in the direction of building a superior race of soldiers – one of Hitler’s obsessions.

War2_1687882a

The-Ovitz-family-006

“I now have work for 20 years”, Mengele exclaimed. As soon as he saw the Ovitz family, he immediately ordered that they be spared and arranged in privileged living quarters, where they would be given larger food portions and enjoyed better hygiene. He was particularly interested in the fact that the family included both dwarfs and middle-height individuals, so he ordered the “normal” members also to be spared from gas chambers. Hearing this, some other prisoners from the Ovitz’ village claimed to be blood-related to them (and the Ovitz of course did not deny it), and were moved along with them.

In exchange for their relatively more comfortable life, in respect to other inmates – their hair was not shorn, nor were they forced to part from their clothes – the Ovitzs were subjected to a long series of experiments. Mengele regularly took blood samples from them (even from the 18-months-old child).

Written accounts of inmate doctors shed further light on the endless anthropological measurements and comparisons between the Ovitzs and their neighbours, whom Mengele mistook for family. The doctors extracted bone marrow, pulled out healthy teeth, plucked hair and eyelashes, and carried out psychological and gynaecological tests on them all.
The four married female dwarves were subjected to close gynaecological scrutiny. The teenage girls in the group were terrified by the next phase in the experiment: that Mengele would couple them with the dwarf men and turn their wombs into laboratories, to see what offspring would result. Mengele was known to have done it to other experimental subjects.

(Koren & Negev, The dwarfs of Auschwitz)

The “White Angel” kept a voluntarily ambiguous relationship with the family, constantly walking a fine line between mercyless cruelty and surprising kindness. In fact, although he had already gathered hundreds of twins, and could sacrifice them if need be (accounts tell of seven couples of twins killed in one single night), he only had one family of dwarfs.
Still, the Ovitzs didn’t indulge in false hopes: they were conscious that, despite their privileges, they would die in there.

Instead, they lived to see the liberation of Auschwitz on January 27, 1945. They walked for seven months to get back to their village, only to find their home looted; four years later they emigrated to Israel, where they resumed touring with their show until they eventually retired in 1955.

The-Ovitzs-leaving-the-ca-008

Perla-and-Elizabeth-Ovitz-008

a237651196d324ad85d3a93da92c60aa

Mengele, as is known, escaped to South America under a false name, and during his more than thirty years as a fugitive his legend grew out of proportion; his already terrible deeds were somewhat exaggerated until he became a demon-like character trowing live children in the ovens and killing people just for fun. Reliable accounts evoke a less colourful image of the man, but no less unsettling: the human experiments carried out at Birkenau (and in China, at the same time, inside the infamous Unit 731) rank among the most dreadful examples of scientific research completely detaching itself from moral issues.

The last survivor in the family, Perla Ovitz, died in 2001. Until the end, she kept recounting her family’s tale, encapsulating all the helplessness and painful absurdity of this experience, which she could not possibly explain to herself and to the world, in a single sentence: “I was saved by the grace of the devil“.

perla_III

Further material:

An excerpt from the documentary The Seven Dwarfs of Auschwitz (available here), featuring Perla Ovitz.
Giants: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz (Koren & Negev, 2013) is the main in-depth research on the Ovitz family, based on interviews with Perla and other Auschwitz survivors.
Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz (Lagnado & Dekel 1992) is an account of Mengele’s experiments on twins, with interviews with several survivors.
– The video in which Mengele’s son, Rolf, recounts his meeting with his father – whom he had never knew and who was living incognito in Brazil.
The truth about Cândido Godói, a small village in Brazil with a high twin births rate, where in the Sixties a strange German physician was often seen wandering: did Mengele continue his experiments in South America?

Ulisse Aldrovandi

Dario Carere, our guestblogger who already penned the article about monstrous pedagogy, continues his exploration of the monster figure with this piece on the great naturalist Aldrovandi.

Why are monsters born? The ordering an archiving instinct, which always accompanied scientific analysis, never stopped going along with the interest for the odd, the unclassifiable. What is a monster to us?  It would be interesting to understand when exactly the word monstrum lost its purely marvelous meaning to become more hideous and dangerous. Today what scares us is “monstrous”; and yet monstra have always been the object of curiosity, so much so that they became a scientific category.  The horror movie is a synthesis of our need to be scared, because we do not believe in monsters anymore, or almost.

Bestiaries, wunderkammern and legends about fabulous beasts all have in common a desire to understand nature’s mysteries: this desire never went away, but the difference is that while long ago false things were believed to be true, nowadays the unknown is often exaggerated in order to forcedly obtain an attractive monstrosity, as in the case of aliens, lights in the sky, or Big Foot.

Maybe the wunderkammern, those collections of oddities assembled by rich and cultured men of the past, are the most interesting testimony of the aforementioned instinct.  One of the most famous cabinet of wonders was in Innsbruck, and belonged to Ferdinand II of Austria (1529 – 1595).  Here, beside a splendid woodcarved Image of death, which certainly would have appealed to romantic writers two centuries later, there is a vast array of paintings depicting unique subjects, as well as persons showing strange diseases. The interest for the bizarre becomes here a desire for possession, almost a prestige: what for us would be a news story, at the time was a trophy, a miraculous object; it’s a circus in embryo, where repulsion is the attraction.

Image of death, by Hans Leinberger, XVI Century.

Disabled man, anonimous, XVI Century.

This last fascinating painting, depicting a man who probably made a living out of his deformity, calls to mind another extraordinary collector of oddities: Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522 – 1605), born in Bologna, who dedicated his life to study Henry presentation of living creatures and nature.  His studies on deformity are particularly interesting. This ingenious man wrote several scientific books on common and less common phenomena, commissioning several wonderful illustrations to different artists; these boks were mainly destined to universities, and could be considered as the first “virtual” museum of natural science. After his death, his notes and images of monstrous creatures were collected in a huge posthumous work, the Monstruorum historia, together with various considerations by the scholar who curated the edition.  The one I refer to (1642) can be easily consulted, as many other works by Aldrovandi, in the digital archive of historic works of the University of Bologna.

It was a juicy evolution of the concept of bestiary: the monster was not functional to a moralizing allegory anymore, but became a real case of scientific study, and oddities or deformities were illustrated as an aspect of reality (even if some mythical and literary suggestions remain in the text; the 16th century still had not parted from classical sources, quite fantastic but deemed reliable at the time).

Dc1565

Dc1564

Dc1563

The book mainly examines anthropomorphic monsters; these were often malformed cases, and even if they did not qualify as a new species, for Aldrovandi they were interesting enough for a scientific account. The anatomical malformation began to find place in a medical context, and Aldrovandi anticipated Linnaeus for nomenclatures and precision, even if he wasn’t a systematic classifier: he was preoccupied with presenting the various anomalies to future scholars, but in his work there is still a certain confusion between observation and legend.

Faceless men, armless men, but also men with a surplus of arms or heads were presented along centaurs, satyrs, winged creatures and the Sciapods (legendary men with one gigantic foot which protected them from the sun, as described by Plinius). There were also images of exotic people, wild tribes living in remote places, wearing strange hats or jewelry; although not deformed, they were nonetheless wonderous, strange. All monstra.

Dc1568

Dc1581

A great introduction to Aldrovandi’s “mythology” is Animali e creature mostruose di Ulisse Aldrovandi, curated by Biancastella Antonino. Beside richly presenting wonderful color illustrations of animals, seashells and monsters from Aldrovandi’s work, this book also features some interesting essays; among the contributors, patologist Paolo Scarani speculates that Aldrovandi’s gaze upon his subjects was not always one of curiosity, but also of compassion. If this naturalist saw and met first-hand come “monsters”, how did he feel about them? Maybe the purpose of his studies was to provide the scientific community  with a new approach to the monstrosities of nature − a more humane approach; to prove his point Scarani examines the image of an unlikely bird-man pierced by several arrows. Moreover Scarani examines the illustrations of Aldrovandi’s monsters in the light of now well-known malformations: anencephaly, sirenomelia, parasitic twins, etc., and concludes that Aldrovandi may be considered an innovator in the medical field too, on the account of his peculiar attention to deformity in humans and animals (an example is the seven-legged veal, illustrated from a real specimen).

Dc1580

Dc1574

Dc1569

Dc1576

Given the eccentricity of some of these monsters, it is not always easy to determine exactly when fantasy is mixed to the scientific account. Aldrovandi is an interesting meeting point between ancient beliefs (supported by respected sources that could not be contradicted) and the rising scientific revolution. The appearance of some monsters can be attributed to “familiar” pathologies (two-headed persons, legless persons, people with their face entirely covered with hair are now commonly seen on controversial TV shows), but others look like they came from a fantasy saga or some medieval bas relief. As Scarani puts it:

[Aldrovandi’s care for details], together with the clarity with which the malformations are represented, contributes to the feeling of embarassment before the figures of clearly invented malformations. Later interpolations? I don’t think so. The fact that some illustrations are hybrid, showing known malformations besides fantastic creatures (as a child with a frog’s face), makes me think that Aldrovandi included them, maybe from popular etchings, because it’s the weorld he lived in! They were so widely discussed, even in respected publications, […] that he had to conform to the sources. Of course, respect fo the authority principle and ancient traditions does not help progress. Everyone does what he can.

Aldrovandi’s work can be considered a great wunderkammer, an uneven collection of notable findings, devoid of a rigid and aristotelic classification but inspired by an endless curiosity which pairs the observation with an enthsaism for the wonderous and the unexplainable. Two other scholars from Bologna, B. Sabelli and S. Tommasini, write:

All this [the exposition of miscellaneous objects in the cabinets of curiosities] was inherited from the past, but also followed the spirit of the time which saw natural products as a proof and symbol for the legendary tradition – metamorphosis is a constant element in myths – and considered the work of nature and the work of the artist homogeneous, or even anthagonist, as the artist tried to reach and exceed nature.

From this idea of “exceeding” Nature come those illustrations in which animals we could easily identify (rhinos, lizards, turtles) are altered because the animal lived in a distant land, a place neither Aldrovandi nor the reader would ever visit; and the weirdest oddity was attributed in ancient times to faraway places, also because “normality” is often just a purely geographic concept.

Today, monsters do not inhabit mysterious and distant lands; yet, have our repulsion and our curiosity changed? There’s no use in denying it: we need monsters, even if only to reassure ourselves of out normality, to gain some degree of control over what we do not understand. Aldrovandi anticipated 19th century teratology: many of his illustrations remained perfectly valid through the following centuries, and those “extraordinary lives” we see on TV had already been studied and presented in his work. Examples span from the irsute lady to the woman born with no legs who had, as chronicles reported, an enchanting face. The circus never left town, it has just become standardized. Scarani writes:

What is striking, in these representations, is their being practically superimposable to the other illustrated teratologic casebooks that followed Aldrovandi. Maybe his plates were copied. I don’t think this is the only explanation, even if plausible given the enormous success of Aldrovandi’s iconography. More recent preparations of malformed specimens, or photographs, are still perfectly superimposable to many of Aldrovandi’s plates.

How weird, for our modern sensibility, to find next to these rare patologies the funny and legendary Sciapods, depicted in their canonic posture!

Dc1575

Dc1573

Dc1571

Aldrovandi, on the other hand, did not just chase monsters, for teratology was only one of the many areas of study he engaged in. Within this word, “teratology”, lies the greek root for “monster”, “wild beast”: because of men of extraordinary ingenuity, like Aldrovandi, luckily today we do not associate diversity with evil anymore. Yet the monstrous does not cease to attract us, even now that the general tendency is to “flatten” human categories. It is a reminder of how frail our supremacy over reality is, a reality which seems to be equipping us with a certain number of legs or eyes by mere coincidence. The monster symbolizes chaos, and chaos, even if it is not forcedly evil, even if we no longer have mythical-religious excuses to get rid of it, will perhaps always be seen as an enemy.

Dc1572

Dc1578

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – I

New York, Novembre 2011. È notte. Il vento gelido frusta le guance, s’intrufola fra i grattacieli e scende sulle strade in complicati vortici, senza che si possa prevedere da che parte arriverà la prossima sferzata. Anche le correnti d’aria sono folli ed esagerate, qui a Times Square, dove il tramonto non esiste, perché i maxischermi e le insegne brillanti degli spettacoli on-Broadway non lasciano posto alle ombre. Le basse temperature e il forte vento non fermano però il vostro esploratore del bizzarro, che con la scusa di una settimana nella Grande Mela, ha deciso di accompagnarvi alla scoperta di alcuni dei negozi e dei musei più stravaganti di New York.

Partiamo proprio da qui, da Times Square, dove un’insegna luminosa attira lo sguardo del curioso, promettendo meraviglie: si tratta del museo Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not!, una delle più celebri istituzioni mondiali del weird, che conta decine di sedi in tutto il mondo. Proudly freakin’ out families for 90 years! (“Spaventiamo le famiglie, orgogliosamente, da 90 anni”), declama uno dei cartelloni animati.

L’idea di base del Ripley’s sta proprio in quel “credici, oppure no”: si tratta di un museo interamente dedicato allo strano, al deviante, al macabro e all’incredibile. Ad ogni nuovo pezzo in esposizione sembra quasi che il museo ci sfidi a comprendere se sia tutto vero o se si tratti una bufala. Se volete sapere la risposta, beh, la maggior parte delle sorprendenti e incredibili storie raccontate durante la visita sono assolutamente vere. Scopriamo quindi le reali dimensioni dei nani e dei giganti più celebri, vediamo vitelli siamesi e giraffe albine impagliate, fotografie e storie di freak celebri.

Ma il tono ironico e fieramente “exploitation” di questa prima parte di museo lascia ben presto il posto ad una serie di reperti ben più seri e spettacolari; le sezioni antropologiche diventano via via più impressionanti, alternando vetrine con armi arcaiche a pezzi decisamente più macabri, come quelli che adornano le sale dedicate alle shrunken heads (le teste umane rimpicciolite dai cacciatori tribali del Sud America), o ai meravigliosi kapala tibetani.

Tutto ciò che può suscitare stupore trova posto nelle vetrine del museo: dalla maschera funeraria di Napoleone Bonaparte, alla pistola minuscola ma letale che si indossa come un anello, alle microsculture sulle punte di spillo.

Talvolta è la commistione di buffoneria carnevalesca e di inaspettata serietà a colpire lo spettatore. Ad esempio, in una pacchiana sala medievaleggiante, che propone alcuni strumenti di tortura in “azione” su ridicoli manichini, troviamo però una sedia elettrica d’epoca (vera? ricostruita?) e perfino una testa umana sezionata (questa indiscutibilmente vera). Il tutto per il giubilo dei bambini, che al Ripley’s accorrono a frotte, e per la perplessità dei genitori che, interdetti, non sanno più se hanno fatto davvero bene a portarsi dietro la prole.

Insomma, quello che resta maggiormente impresso del Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not è proprio questa furba commistione di ciarlataneria e scrupolo museale, che mira a confondere e strabiliare lo spettatore, lasciandolo frastornato e meravigliato.

Per tornare unpo’ con i piedi per terra, eccoci quindi a un museo più “serio” e “ufficiale”, ma di certo non più sobrio. Si tratta del celeberrimo American Museum of Natural History, uno dei musei di storia naturale più grandi del mondo – quello, per intenderci, in cui passava una notte movimentata Ben Stiller in una delle sue commedie di maggior successo.

Una giornata intera basta appena per visitare tutte le sale e per soffermarsi velocemente sulle varie sezioni scientifiche che meriterebbero ben più attenzione.

Oltre alle molte sale dedicate all’antropologia paleoamericana (ricostruzioni accurate degli utensili e dei costumi dei nativi, ecc.), il museo offre mostre stagionali in continuo rinnovo, una sala IMAX per la proiezione di filmati di interesse scientifico, un’impressionante sezione astronomica, diverse sale dedicate alla paleontologia e all’evoluzione dell’uomo, e infine la celebre sezione dedicata ai dinosauri (una delle più complete al mondo, amata alla follia dai bambini).

Ma forse i veri gioielli del museo sono due in particolare: il primo è costituito dall’ampio uso di splendidi diorami, in cui gli animali impagliati vengono inseriti all’interno di microambienti ricreati ad arte. Che si tratti di mammiferi africani, asiatici o americani, oppure ancora di animali marini, questi tableaux sono accurati fin nel minimo dettaglio per dare un’idea di spontanea vitalità, e da una vetrina all’altra ci si immerge in luoghi distanti, come se fossimo all’interno di un attimo raggelato, di fronte ad alcuni degli esemplari tassidermici più belli del mondo per precisione e naturalezza.

L’altra sezione davvero mozzafiato è quella dei minerali. Strano a dirsi, perché pensiamo ai minerali come materia fissa, inerte, e che poche emozioni può regalare – fatte salve le pietre preziose, che tanto piacciono alle signore e ai ladri cinematografici. Eppure, appena entriamo nelle immense sale dedicate alle pietre, si spalanca di fronte a noi un mondo pieno di forme e colori alieni. Non soltanto siamo stati testimoni, nel resto del museo, della spettacolare biodiversità delle diverse specie animali, o dei misteri del cosmo e delle galassie: ecco, qui, addirittura le pietre nascoste nelle pieghe della terra che calpestiamo sembrano fatte apposta per lasciarci a bocca aperta.

Teniamo a sottolineare che nessuna foto può rendere giustizia ai colori, ai riflessi e alle mille forme incredibili dei minerali esposti e catalogati nelle vetrine di questa sezione.

Alla fine della visita è normale sentirsi leggermente spossati: il Museo nel suo complesso non è certo una passeggiata rilassante, anzi, è una continua ginnastica della meraviglia, che richiede curiosità e attenzione per i dettagli. Eppure la sensazione che si ha, una volta usciti, è di aver soltanto graffiato la superficie: ogni aspetto di questo mondo nasconde, ora ne siamo certi, infinite sorprese.

(continua…)

Body Worlds a Roma

Abbiamo già trattato, in uno dei primissimi (e ancora timidi!) articoli apparsi su Bizzarro Bazar, di Gunther von Hagens, anatomopatologo inventore della tecnica della plastinazione. Torniamo a parlarne perché, finalmente, la sua celebre mostra itinerante intitolata Body Worlds è sbarcata in Italia, a Roma, dove resterà aperta al pubblico fino al 12 febbraio 2012.

La nuova tecnica di conservazione dei tessuti messa a punto da Von Hagens si basa sulla sostituzione dei liquidi con dei polimeri di silicone; questo permette ai reperti organici di rimanere virtualmente inalterati nel tempo, rigidi e inodori, ma di mantenere perfettamente i colori originari. Così Von Hagens, grazie alle numerose donazioni di cadaveri a scopo scientifico, ha potuto raccogliere un’impressionante collezione anatomica, specialmente preparata per illustrare al pubblico il funzionamento dell’organismo in modo inedito e incisivo.

I cadaveri esibiti nella mostra sono tutti reali, anche se talvolta possono sembrare sculture moderne: sono stati sezionati in modo da mostrare il corpo umano nella sua intricata armonia, lasciando scoperti di volta in volta i differenti sistemi, e le relazioni che intercorrono tra le diverse parti del corpo. Body Worlds offre l’opportunità più unica che rara di sbirciare direttamente dentro il corpo umano come fosse un mondo alieno, di osservare con i propri occhi il posizionamento degli organi, l’incredibile perfezione dei vasi sanguigni o delle fasce muscolari, e di guardare “in diretta” lo sviluppo di un feto.

Un’esperienza da non mancare assolutamente, e che nonostante le mille polemiche continua ad attirare milioni di visitatori; infatti, al lato più squisitamente didattico, unisce anche un inedito livello umano, perché ognuno di quei corpi che oggi ci “insegnano” l’anatomia era un tempo una donna, o un uomo. E, grazie alla loro generosa decisione, anche noi possiamo rimanere stupiti di fronte alla straordinaria complessità del nostro stesso corpo.

Trovate tutte le informazioni sulla mostra sul sito ufficiale.

Progetto MKULTRA

Gli Americani saranno anche dei paranoici cospirazionisti, sempre pronti a vedere intrighi e misteriosi “progetti” dei servizi segreti ovunque; ma bisogna ammettere che questa loro paura non nasce dal nulla. Di cospirazioni e di strane operazioni occulte ne hanno viste e vissute parecchie.

Anni ’50, inizio della Guerra Fredda. Stati Uniti e Russia cominciano a cercare freneticamente nuove armi per essere sempre un passo più avanti del loro avversario. E, in aggiunta alle ricerche batteriologiche e al perfezionamento delle armi atomiche, la CIA decide che ci sono i presupposti per iniziare un’operazione un po’ differente, sperimentale, e soprattutto illegale.

Sotto il nome in codice MKULTRA, il nuovo programma di ricerca segreto si propone di studiare e scoprire dei metodi per controllare la mente delle persone. Vi ricordate il nostro articolo su José Delgado? Ecco, la CIA vuole fare un ulteriore passo innanzi. D’altronde, pochi anni prima, aveva utilizzato l’Operazione Paperclip per reclutare i “migliori” scienziati e criminali di guerra nazisti, comprando le conoscenze acquisite durante gli esperimenti umani nei campi di sterminio, in cambio dell’immunità dai processi. Alcuni di questi scienziati avevano studiato tecniche di lavaggio del cervello, interrogatorio e tortura.

L’intento della CIA è quello di capire se esiste la possibilità di indurre, ad esempio, una persona all’assassinio programmato; se c’è un metodo scientifico per attuare il lavaggio del cervello o estorcere informazioni durante un interrogatorio; se si può alterare la percezione degli eventi nei testimoni, e via dicendo. Va da sé che per raggiungere questi risultati occorrono cavie umane. Così, se molti dei soggetti studiati dal progetto MKULTRA sono consenzienti, i ricercatori comprendono subito che per ottenere delle analisi precise e delle prove inconfutabili serviranno anche soggetti ignari… cavie che non sappiano di star prendendo parte all’esperimento. Anche in questo risiede l’illegalità dell’operazione, coperta quindi dal massimo segreto. E, sempre in massimo segreto, vengono investiti milioni e milioni di dollari in un progetto che a posteriori si può tranquillamente definire aberrante e criminale.

La maggior parte degli esperimenti relativi a MKULTRA hanno a che fare con le droghe. Si ricercano sostanze che alterino la mente in tutti i modi possibili: dalle sostanze più innocue che favoriscano la concentrazione, o che si dimostrino efficaci come rimedio per il dopo-sbronza… fino ai metodi chimici per creare confusione, depressione, paranoia e shock prolungati in un soggetto, per inibire le menzogne, per creare uno stato di ipnosi, per indurre lo svenimento istantaneo o la paralisi degli arti. Insomma, droghe “positive” che possono potenziare le truppe americane; e droghe “negative”, destinate a controllare e alterare la forza mentale del prigioniero o del nemico.

Gli esperimenti di MKULTRA meglio conosciuti sono quelli legati alla sperimentazione dell’LSD. Sintetizzata per la prima volta nel 1938 da Albert Hoffman, la dietilamide-25 dell’acido lisergico (LSD) era ancora sconosciuta al grande pubblico.  Gli agenti di MKULTRA decisero di comprendere i suoi effetti su una serie di cavie ignare, e nella famigerata Operazione Midnight Climax misero a punto questo sistema: dopo aver installato dei finti specchi in alcuni bordelli di San Francisco, con la complicità delle prostitute facevano in modo che al cliente venisse servito un drink in cui era stata disciolta una potente dose di acido. La “sessione” veniva quindi filmata da dietro lo specchio.

A poco a poco gli effetti della droga si manifestavano, e i clienti cominciavano ad essere preda di violente e incontrollabili allucinazioni; come si sa, l’LSD è fra le sostanze psicoattive sintetiche più potenti, con effetti che ad alti dosaggi possono spingersi ben oltre le 12 ore. I poveri clienti, arrivati con la modesta speranza di una seratina piccante, si ritrovavano di colpo scaraventati nel baratro della follia, in quella che aveva tutta l’aria di essere una crisi psicotica. Non capivano, non potevano capire perché di colpo vedessero le dimensioni della stanza alterarsi, il tempo distorcersi e la carta da parati pulsare come fosse viva. Si convincevano di essere impazziti di colpo, e il terrore si impadroniva di loro. Una volta esauriti gli effetti della droga, gli agenti si palesavano e intimavano alla vittima, ancora sotto shock, di non rivelare nulla di quanto era successo. Se avessero raccontato la loro storia, si sarebbe anche saputo che frequentavano il bordello… Alcuni dei soggetti non si ripresero più, e finirono ospedalizzati, e molti ritengono che diversi suicidi siano imputabili a questi esperimenti senza scrupoli.

Oltre alla somministrazione di droghe, il progetto sondò anche le diverse possibilità offerte dalla deprivazione sensoriale, dall’ipnosi, dalla privazione del sonno e dagli abusi verbali e fisici. Che tipo di osservazioni scientifiche si potevano trarre da simili esperimenti? Che valore aveva questa ricerca? Quando la CIA ammise pubblicamente, fra il 1975 e il 1977, l’esistenza del progetto MKULTRA e offrì le sue scuse, confessò anche che tutte queste ricerche non avevano portato ad alcun risultato concreto.  Gli agenti a capo degli esperimenti, si scoprì, non avevano nemmeno le qualifiche necessarie per essere degli osservatori scientificamente attendibili. Quindi la massiccia operazione, dal costo stimato di più di 10 milioni di dollari, e che aveva coinvolto numerose multinazionali farmaceutiche e distrutto la vita a molti civili divenuti cavie, non era servita a nulla.

Nonostante la declassificazione di molti documenti, iniziata nel 1977, e le ammissioni della CIA, c’è chi è pronto a giurare che la “confessione” sia un ulteriore depistaggio, e che il progetto MKULTRA non sia mai stato chiuso: continuerebbe ancora, sotto diverso nome, per mettere a punto metodi sempre più perfezionati di controllo della mente.

Ma la cosa forse più curiosa è un effetto boomerang che la CIA non poteva prevedere, e che cambiò la storia. Come ricordato, non tutti i soggetti degli esperimenti di MKULTRA erano vittime ignare. Fra i volontari che si sottoposero ad alcuni test con l’LSD in California, c’era anche un giovane studente della Stanford University. Questo ragazzo, sconvolto dal potenziale della droga, decise che avrebbe cercato di promuovere l’LSD anche al di fuori di MKULTRA. Lo studente era Ken Kesey, autore di Qualcuno volò sul nido del cuculo, che di lì a poco avrebbe fondato i Merry Pranksters e girato gli Stati Uniti portando follia e buonumore su un furgoncino multicolore, dispensando dosi gratuite di LSD a chiunque volesse provare. Grazie a Kesey cominciò la rivoluzione degli anni ’60, la pacifica ribellione hippie, e la cosiddetta psichedelia che cambiò volto alla società, alla musica, alla politica e alla cultura.

Da un terribile progetto segreto militare per il controllo della mente, quindi, nacque paradossalmente un movimento che in pochi anni conquistò il mondo; milioni di ragazzi cominciarono a predicare la liberazione della mente, l’espansione e l’allargamento della coscienza, l’uguaglianza dei diritti, il sesso libero, la convivenza pacifica e l’affrancamento da qualsiasi organizzazione militare o politica. Non esattamente quello che i vertici della CIA, con tutte le loro sofisticate conoscenze, avevano sperato di ottenere.

Kapala

I kapala (in sanscrito, “teschio”) sono coppe rituali caratteristiche del tantrismo di matrice induista o buddista, utilizzate in diversi rituali sacri, e ricavate normalmente dalla calotta cranica di un teschio umano.

Tipiche del tantrismo tibetano, quello più specificatamente magico e sciamanico, queste coppe sono spesso scolpite in bassorilievo con figure sacre (soprattutto Kali la dea dell’eterna energia, Shiva il distruttore e creatore, principio primo di tutte le cose, e Ganesha colui che rimuove gli ostacoli), e talvolta montate con elaborati orpelli e abbellimenti in metallo e pietre preziose.

Gli utilizzi rituali di queste coppe sono molteplici: vengono impiegate nei monasteri tibetani come piatti di offerta di libagioni per gli dèi – pane o dolci a forma di occhi, lingue, orecchie – come oggetti di meditazione, o per iniziazioni esoteriche che prevedono che dai kapala si beva sangue o vino. A seconda di cosa contengono, le coppe vengono chiamate con differenti appellativi.

Gli dèi tantrici vengono talvolta rappresentati mentre reggono dei kapala nelle mani, o bevono il sangue da simili coppe. Esistono kapala ricavati da teschi di scimmie o di capre, che come quelli umani debbono essere consacrati prima che si possano utilizzare per scopi religiosi.

L’antica tradizione dei kapala è vista spesso come un retaggio di antichi sacrifici umani. Quello che ne resta al giorno d’oggi è una strana, macabra ma affascinante forma d’arte e di scultura, una sorta di memento mori ritualizzato, che dona a questi oggetti un alone di mistero e ci riconnette al senso più vero e ineluttabile del sacro.

Kate MacDowell

L’artista statuinitense Kate MacDowell realizza delle sculture in porcellana assolutamente originali. Si interroga sul posto dell’essere umano all’interno dell’ecosistema, e più in particolare sul suo rapporto con gli animali. Le sue creazioni mostrano una strana e inquietante ibridazione fra la struttura organica umana e quella degli animali rappresentati, come se esistesse una sostanziale identità – e, insieme, un conflitto insanabile. Noi siamo parte del mondo animale, e allo stesso tempo ne siamo i carnefici.

Le sue sculture mostrano creature morte e sezionate che spesso nascondono al loro interno strutture ossee umane, o nuove simboliche mescolanze di forme. “Nel mio lavoro – afferma l’artista – questo ideale romantico di unione con la natura emerge in conflitto con il nostro impatto moderno sull’ambiente. Questi pezzi […] prendono anche in prestito dal mito, dalla storia dell’arte, dai luoghi comuni linguistici, e da altre pietre miliari culturali.  In alcune opere gli aspetti della figura umana ci rappresentano, e causano inquietanti, talvolta umoristiche mutazioni che illustrano il nostro odierno rapporto con il mondo naturale. […] In ogni modo, l’unione fra uomo e natura è mostrato come causa di attrito e disagio, con la difficile implicazione che siamo vulnerabili riguardo alle nostre stesse pratiche distruttrici”.

La scelta del mezzo non è casuale: “Ho scelto la porcellana per le sue qualità luminose e fantasmatiche, così come per la sua forza e capacità di mostrare i dettagli scultorei. Sottolinea l’impermanenza e la fragilità delle forme naturali in un ecosistema che muore, mentre, paradossalmente, essendo un materiale che può durare migliaia di anni, è associato con uno status nobile e con un valore elevato”.

“Vedo ogni opera come un esemplare catturato e preservato, un minuzioso registro di forme di vita naturali in pericolo, e uno sguardo sulla nostra stessa colpa”.

Le fragili e precarie forme impresse nella porcellana ci interrogano sulla nostra identità, che amiamo distinguere dal mondo naturale, ma che vi è inevitabilmente collegata.

Il sito ufficiale di Kate MacDowell.

Little Albert

Abbiamo già parlato di quanto la medicina di inizio ‘900 andasse poco per il sottile quando si trattava di fare esperimenti su animali o sugli uomini stessi. Basta consultare, per una breve storia degli esperimenti umani, questa pagina (in inglese) che riporta le date essenziali della ricerca medico-scientifica condotta in maniera poco etica. Il sito ricorda che, dall’inoculazione di varie piaghe o malattie infettive (senza il consenso del paziente) fino agli esperimenti biochimici di massa, i ricercatori hanno spesso dimenticato il precetto di Ippocrate Primum non nocere.

Ma anche la psicologia, in quegli anni, non scherzava. Uno degli esperimenti più celebri, e divenuto presto un classico della psicologia, fu quello portato avanti da John B. Watson assieme alla sua collega Rosalie Rayner, e conosciuto con il nome Little Albert.

John Watson è il padre del comportamentismo, cioè quella branca della psicologia che nasceva dallo studio dell’etologia animale per applicarla all’uomo, nella convinzione che il comportamento fosse l’unico dato verificabile scientificamente. Ricordate il celebre cane di Pavlov, che sbavava non appena sentiva una campanella? Watson era convinto che il sistema di ricompensa e punizione fosse presente anche nell’uomo, o almeno nel bambino. Si spinse addirittura oltre, pensando di poter “programmare” la personalità di un individuo agendo attivamente sul suo sviluppo infantile. I suoi studi cercavano di comprendere come l’essere umano si sensibilizzasse a certi avvenimenti o a certe cose durante la precoce fase dei primi mesi di età. E siccome, a sentire lui, i suoi risultati gli davano ragione, arrivò ad affermare: “Datemi una dozzina di bambini sani e farò di ognuno uno specialista a piacere, un avvocato, un medico, ecc. a prescindere dal suo talento, dalle sue inclinazioni, tendenze, capacità, vocazioni e razza”. Negli anni ’20 pensare di poter programmare il futuro del proprio bambino sembrava un’utopia. Dopo il nazismo, l’opinione comune avrebbe cambiato rotta, e visto in simili idee di controllo un’offesa alla libertà individuale. Ma i campi di Buchenwald erano ancora distanti.

L’esperimento che rese celebre Watson fu compiuto durante i mesi a cavallo tra il 1919 e il 1920. Little Albert era un bambino sano di poco più di nove mesi di età. Nella prima fase dell’esperimento (i primi due mesi), Watson e Rayner misero in contatto il bambino con, nell’ordine: una cavia bianca, un coniglio, un cane, una scimmia, maschere con e senza barba, batuffoli di cotone, giornali in fiamme, ecc. Il piccolino non mostrava paura nei confronti di alcuno di questi oggetti. Ma Watson era intenzionato a cambiare le cose: nel giro di poche settimane, avrebbe forgiato per il piccolo Albert una bella fobia tutta nuova.

Quando l’esperimento vero e proprio iniziò c’erano alcune sorprese pronte per Albert, che aveva allora 11 mesi e 10 giorni. I ricercatori gli riproposero il contatto ravvicinato con uno degli stessi simpatici animaletti con cui aveva imparato a giocare: la cavia da laboratorio. Ma ora, ogni volta che tendeva una mano per accarezzare il topolino, i ricercatori battevano con un martello una barra d’acciaio posta dietro il bambino, provocando un forte e spaventoso rumore – BANG! Toccava con l’indice il topolino – BANG! Cercava di raggiungere il topolino – BANG! Ci riprovava – BANG!

Il piccolo Albert cominciò a piangere, a cercare di scappare, ad allontanare con i piedi l’animale non appena lo vedeva. Era stato efficacemente programmato per temere i topi. I ricercatori volevano però capire se si fosse instaurato un transfert che provocava l’avversione verso oggetti con qualità similari. Ed era successo proprio questo. Dopo 17 giorni la sua fobia si estese al cotone, alle coperte, alle pelliccie. Infine, anche la sola vista di una maschera da Babbo Natale con la barba lo faceva piangere a dirotto. L’insegnamento era stato recepito: le cose con il pelo sono spaventose e spiacevoli perché fanno BANG.

Dopo un mese di esperimenti, proprio quando il professor Watson voleva cominciare le sue prove di de-programmazione, riportando il bambino a una risposta normale, la madre lo portò via e più nulla si seppe di lui. Già, la madre. Il mistero intorno a chi fosse realmente Little Albert e che razza di vita abbia avuto dopo questo esperimento, e se la madre fosse consenziente, è rimasto oscuro per anni. Le leggende si sprecavano. Finalmente, dopo un’accurata ricerca, sembra che la verità sia venuta a galla. Little Albert era figlio di una balia che allattava e curava i bambini invalidi alla Phipps Clinic presso la Johns Hopkins University di Baltimora dove Watson e Rayner conducevano l’esperimento. Era a conoscenza di cosa stavano facendo al suo bambino, e probabilmente lo portò via con sé quando vide l’effetto che la ricerca aveva prodotto sul suo neonato.

L’esperimento, è doveroso segnalarlo, divenne davvero un classico e aprì la strada per nuove ricerche (con il senno di poi, meno irresponsabili) che continuano tutt’oggi. In quegli anni nessuno sembrò preoccuparsi più di tanto di Albert, ma piuttosto degli incredibili e fino ad allora inediti risultati della ricerca. Non possiamo però sapere se la vita più “normale” che lo attendeva avrebbe potuto sanare le ferite aperte dall’esperimento nel piccolo Albert, se con il tempo sarebbe forse guarito, perché nel 1925 il bambino morì di idrocefalia, sviluppatasi tre anni prima.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hBfnXACsOI]

L’articolo originale di Watson & Rayner è consultabile qui. E qui trovate la pagina di Wikipedia sull’esperimento.