Macabre Masks

The Templo Mayor, built between 1337 and 1487, was the political and religious heart of Tenochtitlán, the city-state in Valley of Mexico that became the capital of the Aztec empire starting from the 15th Century.
Since its remains were accidentally discovered in 1978, during the excavations for Mexico City’s subway, archeologists have unearthed close to 80 ceremonial buildings and an extraordinary number of manufacts from the Aztec (Mexica) civilization.

Among the most peculiar findings, there are some masks created from human skulls.
These masks are quite elaborate: the back of the skull was removed, probably in order to wear them or apply them to a headgear; the masks were colored with dye; flint blades and other decorations were inserted into the eye sockets and nostrils.

In 2016 a team of anthropologists from the University of Montana conducted an experimental research on eight of these masks, comparing them with twenty non-modified skulls found on the same site, in order to learn their sex, age at death, possible diseases and life styles. The results showed that the skull masks belonged to male individuals, 30 to 45-years old, with particularly good teeth, indicating above-average health. From the denture’s shape the anthropologists even inferred that these men came from faraway locations: Toluca Valley, Western Mexico, the Gulf coast and other Aztec towns in the Valley of Mexico. Therefore the skulls very likely belonged to prisoners of noble origins, excellently nourished and lacking any pathologies.

Human sacrifices at the Templo Mayor, for which the Aztecs are sadly known, were a spectacle that could entail different procedures: sometimes the victims were executed by beheading, sometimes through the extraction of the heart, or burned, or challenged to deathly combats.
The masks were produced from the bodies of sacrified warriors; wearing them must have had a highly symbolic value.

If these items survived the ravages of time, it’s because they’re made of bones. But there existed other, more unsettling disguises that have been inevitably lost: the masks made from the flayed skin of a sacrified enemy’s face.

The conquistador Bernal Díaz del Castillo described these skin masks as tanned to look “like glove leather” and said that they were worn during celebrations of military victories. Other masks, made of human skin, were displayed as offerings on temple altars, just as a number of the skull masks, reanimated by shell and stone eyeballs, noses, and tongues, were buried in offerings at the Templo Mayor. Because a defeated enemy’s former powers were believed to be embedded in his skin and bones, masks made of his relics not only transferred his powers to the new owner but could serve as worthy offerings to the god as well.

(Cecelia F. Klein, Aztec Masks, in Mexicolore, September 2012)

During a month-long ceremony called Tlacaxiphualiztli, “the Flaying of Men”, the skin of sacrified prisoners was peeled off and worn for twenty days to celebrate the war god Xipe Totec. The iconography portrays this god clothed in human skin.

Such masks, wether made of bone or of skin, have a much deeper meaning than the ritual itself. They play an important role in establishing identity:

In Aztec society a warrior who killed his first captive was said to ‘assume another face.’ Regardless of whether this expression referred literally to a trophy mask or was simply a figure of speech, it implies that the youth’s new “face” represented a new social identity or status. Aztec masks therefore must be understood as revelations, or signs, of a person’s special status rather than as disguises […]. In Nahuatl, the language spoken by the Aztecs, the word for face, xayacatl, is the same word used to refer to something that covers the face.

(Cecelia F. Klein, Ibid.)

Here is the interesting point: there’s not a single culture in the whole world which hasn’t elaborated its own masks, and they very rarely are simple disguises.
Their purpose is “the development of personality […], or more accurately, the development of the person [which] is a question of magical prestige“: the masks “are actually used among primitives in in totem ceremonies, for instance, as a means of enhancing or changing the personality” (Carl Gustav Jung, The Ego and the Uncoscious, 1928, p. 155).

Much in the same way, the decorated skulls of Templo Mayor are not so “exotic” as we might like to imagine. These manufacts are but a different declination of ideas we are quite familiar with — ideas that are at the very core of our own society.

The relationship between the face (our identity and individuality) and the mask we wear, is a very ancient paradox. Just like for the Aztecs the term xayacatl could indicate both the mask and the face, for us too they are often indistinguishable.

The very word person comes from the Latin “per-sonare”, “to resound through”: it’s the voice of the actor behind his mask.
Greek tragedy was born between the 7th and 5th century BCE, a representation that essentialy a substitute for human sacrifices, as Réné Girard affirmed. One of the most recognized etimologies tells us that tragedy is actually the song of the scapgoat: an imitation of the ritual killing of the “internal stranger” on the altar, of the bloody spectacle with which society cleansed itself, and washed away its most impure, primiteve urges. Tragedy plays – which Athenians were obligated to attend by law, during Dionysus celebrations – substituted the ancestral violence of the sacrifice with its representation, and the scapegoat with the tragic hero.

Thus the theater, in the beginning, was conflict and catharsis. A duel between the Barbarian, who knows no language and acts through natural instinct, and the Citizen, the son of order and logos.
Theater, just like human sacrifice, created cultural identity; the Mask creates the person needed for the mise-en-scene of this identity, forming and regulating social interactions.

The human sacrifices of the ancient Greeks and of the Aztec both met the same need: cultural identity is born (or at least reinforced) by contrast with the adversary, offered and killed on the altar.
Reducing the enemy to a skull — as the Aztecs did with the tzompantli, the terrible racks used to exhibit dozens, maybe hundreds of sacrifice victims skulls — is a way of depriving him of his mask/face, of annihilating his identity. Here are the enemies, all alike, just bleached bones under the sun, with no individual quality whatsoever.

But turning these skulls into masks, or wearing the enemy’s skin, implies a tough work, and therefore means performing an even more conscious magical act: it serves the purpose of acquiring his strength and power, but also of reasserting that the person (and, by extension, society) only exists because of the Stranger it was able to defeat.

The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

Henry Tonks and the Faceless Boys

I have wrote in the past about how plastic surgery was originally born during the Great War as reconstructive surgery. If a soldier missing an arm or a leg was indeed a familiar figure, the introduction of new weapons during the world conflict led to the appearance of a kind of wounds precedently almost unheard of: the gueules cassées, “disfigured faces”.
Helmets were able to protect the head from granade splinters, but not the face; therefore field hospitals began to receive an unimaginable number of soldier whose faces had been blown away in large portions by the explosions.
It was an injury rarely discussed in the press, where the more iconic and patriotic image of the veteran amputee was considered more suitable, but the numbers speak for themselves: within English troops alone, 41.000 amputations were carried out, as opposed to the 60.500 men who suffered head or eye injury.
One had a higher probability of finding himself without a face rather than without legs.

Practically on every front, experimental procedures were adopted to reconstruct faces destroyed by shrapnel or burned by mustard gas.
In January 1916, at the military hospital in Aldershot, England, pioneer surgeon Harold Gillies encountered doctor Henry Tonks, who was serving as a temporary lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps.

Henry Tonks was a doctor and an artist: besides being part of the Royal College of Surgeons, he also taught drawing and anatomy at the Slade Academy.

Soldiers were sent back from the front in desperate conditions, and  Tonks had the feeling that he could not handle, from a professional and humane point of view, such a catastrophe. As he himself confessed in a letter: “I have decided that I am not any use as a doctor“. And in another letter he recounted: “the wounds are horrible, and I for one will be against wars in the future, you have no right to ask men to endure such suffering. It would not matter if the wounds did well but they are practically all septic“.
And as the war progressed, things did not improve. After the Somme offensive, on July the 1st 1916, more than 2.000 patients flooded the hospital: “men without half their faces; men burned and maimed to the condition of animal“.

Thus, when Gillies asked Tonks to document his reconstructive operations by portraying the patients’ faces before and after surgery, Tonks happily accepted, as he was certainly more at ease in the artistic dimension.
To draw portraits could seem redundant, as photographs of the disfigured soldiers were already being taken, but both doctors were convinced that the cold-hearted objectiveness of film could be misleading in respect to the tactile and expressive qualities of a painting.

Thanks to his collaboration with Gillies, Henry Tonks produced a seried of facial wound portraits which still today stands unsurpassed for its emotional impact, scientific interest and subtlety of representation.
Sure, these pastel portraits had first of all a didactic intent, and the author himself did not wish them to be seen by the general public. And yet these works show a complexity that transcends their function of medical illustrations.

To understand how Tonks worked on his subjects, we have an extraordinary fortune: in some cases, the archives still have both his pastel portraits and the medical photographs. We can therefore watch, side by side, two images of the same patient, one recorded on film and the other one composed by the charcoal and colors of the artist.

Comparing Tonks’ drawings with the photographic shots, what emerges is the abstraction operated by the artist, which is meant to remove any hint at the patient’s suffering or interiority. These are accurate works, detached and at the same time compassionate, focusing mainly on the open wound, depicted with an almost “tactile” precision through the stratification of color (a consequence of the artist’s surgical training).
And yet the uncanny quality of these drawings lies in their absolutely modern ambiguity.
What could by all means be a portrait of a normal male face — ordinary traits, well-groomed hair, a knotted tie — becomes somehow “sabotaged” by the presence of the wound. It is as if our gaze, wondering over the painting’s surface, could register all these common details, just to be short-circuited the moment it meets the scandal of the injury. An inconceivable monstrosity, which appears impossible to integrate with the rest of the image.
It is then inevitable for us to fall back to the eyes of the portrayed subject, to his gaze fixed upon us, and to wonder about its impenetrable meaning.

Another peculiarity is the use of pastel, a medium considered “feminine” in respect to more virile, lively oil color or tempera; a choice that in this case allows for the lacerations of the flesh to be rendered in a softer and more tolerable way. What’s more, thanks to the lighter tone of these colors, Tonks provides his subjects with a delicate beauty and tenderness that no photograph could have ever captured.
These portraits seem as vulnerable as the mutilated youth they represent.

Suzannah Biernoff, in her wonderful essay Flesh Poems: Henry Tonks and the Art of Surgery (from which I stole most of the information for this post — you can read it in Visual Culture in Britain, n. 11, 2010) defines Henry Tonks’ works as “anti-portraits, in the sense that they stage the fragility and mutability of subjectivity rather than consolidating the self portrayed“.

Henry Tonks’ studies are set apart from classic medical illustration by virtue of this research of a particular beauty. They do not recoil from the horror they intend to portray, but cover it with a veil of elusive sensuality, in which a face becomes the sign of the uncertainty of existence, and a symbol of the cruelty Man inflicts upon himself.

The Stone Pinacotheca

Article by guestblogger Stefano Cappello

I lived in Catania for several years, first as a student at the liberal-arts college, then on the account of my work. Art always fascinated me, and being ale to live and travel throughout Sicily allowed me to discover this place where the highest expressions of human creativity lived together for thousands of years, sometimes blending together with unique results.

Visiting one of Catania’s churches, I happened to notice how the marble on the altar formed curious shapes: through the veinings, one could almost grasp grotesque faces, animal masks, bizarre figures.

123

The practice of putting two marble stones near each other in order to obtain a specular image is known as “macchia aperta” (book matched). Used for thousands of years, such a technique combines two consecutive slabs, which are cut and then put side by side, so that the veinings can form the image that up until then had been “sleeping” in the marble.

I started to visit other churches in town, only to find the phenomenon was quite widespread. The cutting of slabs and their arrangement were intentional, and these examples cannot be explained with pareidolia — the subconscious illusion that leads us to interpret artificial or natural visual stimuli as recognizable shapes.
Perhaps we should better think of these marble figures in relation to the concept of Gamahés, implying a sacred aspect of images and forms, which the Anima Mundi impresses within the stone in the shape of faces, animals, symbols or even whole landscapes, as in the case of the Paesina Stone. Through the same occult process, pictures could be ingrained in the marble by that very creative force, the natura naturans generating every aspect of reality, and they could be waiting for a sharp wit who, thanks to his sensitivity, will be able to bring them to light.

All these churches have in common the fact that they’ve been rebuilt from scratch after the devastating earthquake which on January 11, 1693, destroyed Catania. The city suffered huge losses, about 16.000 victims on a 20.000 citizen population.
A huge emergency project was set afoot to bring things back to normal in reasonable time. The reconstruction of the city shows how the catastrophe entailed a search for innovative architectural solutions of the highest quality. These innovations, which were applied in various degrees to all the villages struck by the earthquake in the Noto valley, were elaborated by what could be considered as a “unique experimental workshop of Baroque international models”.

In the particular case of Catania, the unity of this project can be seen on a structural level, as shock-absorbing materials were used in view of a possible new shake, and on a urban level. The city was completely re-planned, with broader streets and escape routes [1].
One of the marbles used in churches, the Libeccio Antico of Sicily, is also called Breccia Pontificia, because it was also used in the Vatican. This rare and precious marble, extracted from the Custonaci caves, is perfect for macchia aperta manufacturing, so that the internal veinings can emerge.

The fact that its figurative use was intentional is quite evident in the S. Agata la Vetere Church where, on the side altar that once contained the remains of the Martyr, these marbles can be found.

4

It looks like this red jasper slab was meant to represent the outline of the Saint’s body laying in a sarcophage. If we rotate the image, the composition is even clearer.

5

We can see the head, shoulders, the arms bent on her chest, her hips, legs, and her feet emerging from the garment.
Suggestion may go even further. On the silhouette’s chest, for example, one could almost see a Flaming Heart. A spherical shape is at the base of the figure, which is surrounded by a sort of aura.
The whole shape is consistent, in its proportions, with a female body.
The visual stimuli such a contour can suggest, if we consider it as standing on a globe, refer to the iconography of the Virgin Mary. This hypothetical “transfer” would be justified when applied to a female Saint, as in Christian tradition all female figures are in fact manifestations of the Sacred Feminine archetype.

Another example of the intentionality of these marble depictions can be found in the Church of St. Micheal Archangel. Here, like in other churches in town, the representations often appear in couples, at the bottom of the columns near the side altars.

6

These marbles show two stylized figures, of which we can make out the head, neck, stretched-out arms, chest and tunic. Behind these silhouettes are shapes that could be interpreted as wings, of which the veinings even seem to trace the plumage. The whole figure could refer to the Byzantine iconography of the Archangel.

In Catania’s churches, marbles take us on a trip through beasts, men, Saints and demons.

7

8

The following mirrored marbles seem to represent several faces, each wearing a hat that resembles a wolf’s head. This depiction could refer to the iconography of  Hades, god of the Underworld, wearing the kunée, the Helm of Darkness.

9

If we suppose that marble workers acted freely, without their ecclesial clients knowing, we can imagine that their craftmanship combined with a knowledge of treatises was used to explore this figurative expression, and it could testify the existence of a clandestine ideology. These marbles could offer an example of such underground symbolism.

Here are two grotesque faces, of which we can identify the eyes, nose, mouth, and what looks like a mitre.

10

Here’s another curious image emerging from these slabs: a grinning creature, with what could be its hands (the veinings seem to outline the fingers) held before its chest, in a triangular shape.

11

The peculiarity of this grotesque face is that it can be found behind an altar, hidden from direct view. Is this an example of the typical Baroque need to fill out every empty space, of the horror vacui?

12

In the church of S. Francesco all’Immacolata we can find the following marbles, showing what looks like a donkey-headed seated figure. We can see its long ears, its snout, its nostrils. The hands, coherent in proportions, are in its lap and the symmetrical neinings on the slab’s sides give the perspective idea of a throne. What is interesting is that this figure has been created with an inlay work, using both the natural veinings and an artificial technique in order to obtain a specific figurative suggestion. This practice was already documented by Pliny, who in his Naturalis historia reported how, in his time, marble-cutters managed not only to cover with marble the walls of temples and public buildings, but even to carve them and insert small stones in shape of animals and other things. They actually began “painting with stone” (“coepimus et lapide pingere”, Nat. hist., Liber xxxv, 3).

13

The composition of these marble slabs seem to copy the structure of a railing from Samothracia, an important place for Mystery (Orphic) Cults in the Greek world. Here we have veinings that take the form of two bucrania on each side, and in the middle — where in the Samothracian version there was an eight-petal flower — a greek cross with four additional rays, as if to remain faithful to the original symbology.

14

We can imagine that such compositions sometimes referred to pre-existing models, and thus marble-makers were researching those exact shapes in the stone, while in other cases the veinings themselves suggested an image. These simulacra manifested themselves both with the firmness of symbols, archetypes, and the ever-changing uncertainty of the colored surface, the evanescent shape given by an immanent Nature.

The interesting aspect of this unsung chapter of Sicilian Baroque is that the Monstrous, the Grotesque, the Uneven which had not been adopted in religious or civil buildings, actually penetrated them in disguise. From three-dimensional sculpture to two-dimensional slabs, subtly flattened on the walls, decorating the altars right near those very paintings which were used to maintain the Church’s power in the form of Biblia pauperum, these marbles were a kind of parallel stone pinachoteca.

We do not know the ultimate goal of this figurative expression.

We can be sure it was intentional, and it was a thousand-year old decorative system which found its use in representing the bizarre and the grotesque, typical of Baroque culture and especially of the Sicilian Baroque. Probably known in the ecclesial environment at the time, at least in its highest levels, this art form was kept secret and not divulged to the masses.
The inherent ambiguity of these visual stimuli is similar to the lack of objectivity in the Rorschach inkblots, a projective test for which there are no correct answers but rather a subjective meaning.

One could ponder if clients and marble-workers considered the eventuality of the believers noticing these hidden compositions, only apparently chaotic. But even if someone became aware of it, he would had probably never mentioned it without risking the Inquisition, which was active on the island and only abolished in 1782.
Why then selecting rare and precious marbles to compose figures depicting grotesque masks? Was it a simple aesthetic pleasure for a selected few, or rather a specific apotropaic function, the monstrous image used as a spell to ward off the danger of a catastrophe similar to the one that destroyed the city?
The motivation behind such representations is still open to analysis. Several hypothesis could be put forward, just like many analogies can be found with the esoteric tradition — but we should not forget that “there is nothing an enchanted glare cannot recognize in shapes, spots, profiles within the stone” (Roger Caillois, La Scrittura delle Pietre).

To complete our visit to the Stone Pinachoteca, the slab which best represents the beginning and the end of this Voyage is one we can call “The Jester”.

15

Its vibrant eyes, sardonic smile, cap and bells. It reminds us of The Fool, the tarot card whose value is 0, the great multiplier. It is the archetype of everything beyond comprehension, the pilgrim on its Way, emerging from the stone to shout his warning: “Open your eyes!

 


[1] Giuseppe Lanza Duke Camastra, who was nominated general vicar, and architect Giovan Battista Vaccarini were the two personalities mainly remembered for the reconstruction of Catania, while the documents from the Historic Archive and other sources do not report specific information about the workers, who remained anonymous.
Of the few names mentioned in the first years of re-building after the earthquake, a notable one is architect Salvatore De Amico, who is sometimes called Caput Magister, and was born in Aci S. Antonio, a feud belonging to the bishop of Catania. De Amico for five years acted as a bridge between the bishop’s curia and the construction sites: he himself managed funds, hired, coordinated and directed workers, evaluated and bought the materials and the necessary plots of land (Le maestranze acesi nella fase iniziale di ricostruzione di Catania, S. Condorelli).
The architect also designed the new map, and directed works, for the epicopal Palace and five other churches in the city.
The Episcopal curia was the direct client for these works and it is very likely that some religious personalities, among which the bishop Andrea Riggio (son of luigi Riggio Branciforte prince of Campofiorito, renowned aristocrat and diplomat), visited the building sites during construction, and were therefore aware of the decor that would adorn the interiors.

Mummie di palude

Tollundmannen

Siamo abituati a pensare alle mummie come a degli scheletri con ancora un po’ di pelle addosso. Eppure esiste un tipo di mummia esattamente opposta – in cui, cioè, lo scheletro è quasi del tutto deteriorato ma tutti i tessuti molli sono perfettamente preservati. Si tratta delle cosiddette mummie di palude.

Se un cadavere finisce infatti nelle fredde acque di un acquitrino, in certe particolari condizioni di acidità e di bassa temperatura, la decomposizione dei tessuti viene completamente inibita, mentre lo stesso acido presente nella torba scioglie il carbonato di calcio delle ossa. Il risultato è una mummificazione della pelle e degli organi interni stupefacente per dettagli e perfezione (se si esclude il colorito nero-bruno che assume l’epidermide), e una ridotta presenza di struttura ossea.

Grauballemanden_stor
Nell’Europa settentrionale questo tipo di paludi, chimate torbiere, sono comuni, e vi sono stati rinvenuti eccezionali resti umani (ma anche manufatti e carcasse animali) incredibilmente preservati. Nel caso dei corpi umani, i volti e la pelle di questi cadaveri mostrano ancora preziosi dettagli come ad esempio dei tatuaggi, e addirittura in alcuni casi le impronte digitali. E stiamo parlando di mummie risalenti a 5000 anni fa.

Tollundmanden_i_Silkeborgmuseet

L’importanza di questi ritrovamenti è ovviamente fondamentale per gli archeologi, anche se a dire il vero rimangono diversi enigmi al riguardo. La maggior parte di queste mummie, infatti, sono senza dubbio relative alla civiltà dei Celti, diffusa un po’ ovunque nel Nord Europa, dalle isole Britanniche al Danubio. Ma perché i Celti avrebbero voluto lasciare soltanto alcuni dei loro morti nelle paludi, spesso aiutandosi con dei pali per far sprofondare il cadavere? Qual è il motivo di queste sepolture fuori dalla norma? L’unico elemento che abbiamo a disposizione sono i corpi stessi, che mostrano inquietanti segni di violenza: ci sono mummie che sono state evidentemente pugnalate, bastonate, impiccate o strangolate. La mummia di Tollund (forse la più bella, risalente al IV secolo a.C) porta ancora al collo la corda usata per strozzarla; il vecchio di Croghan (vissuto fra il 362 e il 175 a.C.) è stato pugnalato, decapitato, i suoi capezzoli amputati e il suo corpo tagliato a metà. Spesso i cadaveri hanno i capelli rasati di fresco, talvolta soltanto da un lato del capo (come la ragazza di Yde).

tumblr_lf00x594YK1qc6n7jo1_500

TOOL

TollundMan2

crogman3

06
Questi segni di tortura e di morte violenta lasciano tre possibili spiegazioni: o si trattava di esecuzioni di criminali messi a morte, oppure i corpi ci parlano di sacrifici rituali che servivano a propiziare il favore di una qualche divinità (del raccolto di grano o latte, della guerra e via dicendo). Una terza alternativa, meno plausibile, riguarda l’utilizzo divinatorio delle viscere umane: un po’ come facevano gli aruspici etruschi e romani con le interiora di volatili, i Celti avrebbero (secondo Strabone) utilizzato le budella umane a fini oracolari. Quest’ultima teoria è la meno accreditata, e sembra che queste mummie siano con tutta probabilità appartenute a condannati a morte, oppure a vittime sacrificali.

2556084438_637c4c28e9

Yde_Girl
Un’altra interessante applicazione derivante dal perfetto stato di conservazione delle mummie è la possibilità odierna di ricostruire i volti di questi uomini e donne morti migliaia di anni fa. Sembra che si trattasse principalmente di esponenti della nobiltà, dal viso curato e dalle unghie non rovinate da lavori manuali, e le analisi chimiche dei loro capelli ci svelano che non si trattava certo di individui malnutriti.

Yde-girl
Chi erano questi uomini di alta estrazione, destinati a morire e sprofondare nelle nere acque di una palude? Quale scopo aveva la loro cruenta esecuzione? Nessuna risposta ancora è certa. Per adesso i loro resti riposano nei musei, dalle teche pressurizzate sembrano ancora interrogarci… e noi, uomini del futuro, rimarremo forse per sempre ignari del loro segreto.

Grauballemanden2

Grauballemanden3

L’effigie di Sarah Hare

Stow Bardolph è piccolo villaggio del Norfolk, in Inghilterra, che conta 1000 abitanti, quasi tutti contadini. Un turista che per caso si trovasse a passare per quelle piatte campagne disseminate di pecore non troverebbe nulla di particolarmente interessante da visitare nel minuscolo borgo, e finirebbe a rintanarsi di fianco al focolare nell’unico pub di Stow Bardolph, chiamato Hare Arms, che più che un pub è una tenuta, attorniato com’è da giardini in cui beccheggiano pavoni e galline.

DSCF6533

8337081_123894258815
Anche una visita alla chiesetta del paese, dedicata alla Trinità, potrebbe ad una prima occhiata rivelarsi deludente, visto l’interno spoglio e “povero”. Eppure, in un angolo, c’è uno strano armadietto chiuso. Chi l’ha aperto, giura che non scorderà più quel momento.

Dscf6508

8337081_123894248333
“Avevo visto sue fotografie negli anni, da quando l’avevo scoperta a scuola, ma nulla mi avrebbe potuto preparare al brivido della porta dell’armadietto che si apriva. Allora ho capito il motivo di questa porta – lei è terrificante, il suo volto tozzo, verrucoso, lo sguardo sprezzante”, riporta un visitatore.

Dscf6510
Ma chi è la donna ritratta nella scultura?
La macabra effigie in cera contenuta nell’armadietto è quella di Sarah Hare, morta nel 1744 all’età di 55 anni dopo che, secondo la leggenda, aveva osato cucire di domenica, nel giorno di riposo dedicato al Signore; si era quindi punta un dito, forse per punizione divina, soccombendo in seguito alla setticemia. A parte questo episodio, la sua vita non era stata per nulla eccezionale. Eppure il suo testamento, se da un lato ostentava una carità e una generosità notevoli, dall’altra includeva una strana disposizione: “Desidero che sei uomini poveri della parrocchia di Stow o Wimbotsham mi sotterrino, e ricevano cinque scellini per il servizio. Desidero che tutti i poveri di Alms Row abbiano due scellini e una moneta da sei penny ciascuno davanti alla mia tomba, prima che mi calino giù. […] Desidero che la mia faccia e le mie mani siano modellati in cera, con un pezzo di velluto color porpora quale ornamento sulla mia testa, e messi in una cassa di mogano con un vetro antestante, e che siano fissati a questo modo vicino al luogo dove riposa il mio cadavere; sul contenitore potranno essere incisi il mio nome e la data della mia morte nel modo che più si desidera. Se non riuscirò ad eseguire tutto questo mentre sono ancora in vita, potrà essere fatto dopo la mia morte”.

8337081_123894253992
Non sappiamo se i calchi del volto e delle mani vennero eseguiti mentre Sarah Hare era ancora viva, oppure post-mortem: quello che è chiaro è che il suo testamento venne rispettato alla lettera. Possiamo immaginarci la solenne processione con cui il busto venne portato, nell’armadio di legno, fino alla cappella di famiglia che l’avrebbe infine ospitato per i secoli a venire.

Di sculture funebri in marmo che ritraggono il defunto è pieno il mondo, ma la statua in cera di Sarah Hare è l’unica di questo tipo in Inghilterra, se si escludono le effigi presenti nell’abbazia di Westminster. La cosa più straordinaria è l’ordinarietà del soggetto – una donna non celebre, né nobile, di certo non bella, che nella sua vita non diede alcun contributo particolare alla Storia.

DSCF6510 0
Nel 1987 la statua venne restaurata da alcuni esperti che lavoravano anche per Madame Tussauds, assieme all’armadio che negli anni era stato attaccato dai roditori, e all’antica stoffa di velluto rosso ormai quasi distrutta. Oggi quindi l’immagine di cera resiste ancora, quasi 270 anni dopo la sua morte.

In questi 270 anni si sono avvicendati re e regine, l’impero Britannico è sorto e crollato, sono state combattute sanguinose guerre di dimensioni inaudite, il mondo e la vita sono cambiati radicalmente. Ma, in uno sperduto paesino di campagna, dietro un’anta di mogano, ancora non è finita la lunga, immobile e silenziosa veglia che Sarah Hare si è scelta come propria personale forma di immortalità.

2382602226_ab0d8f3851_z

Maschere mortuarie

Le maschere mortuarie sono una delle tradizioni più antiche del mondo, diffusa praticamente ovunque dall’Europa all’Asia all’Africa. Così come assieme al cadavere venivano spesso lasciati viveri, armi o altri oggetti che potessero servire al morto nel suo viaggio verso l’aldilà, spesso coprire il volto con una maschera garantiva al suo spirito maggiore forza e protezione. Nelle tradizioni africane queste maschere erano minacciose e terribili, per spaventare ed allontanare i dèmoni dall’anima del defunto. Nell’antico bacino del Mediterraneo, invece, la maschera veniva forgiata stilizzando le reali fattezze del morto: ricorderete certamente le più famose maschere funerarie, quella di Tutankhamen e quella attribuita tradizionalmente ad Agamennone (qui sopra).

Ma già dal basso Impero Romano, e poi nel Medio Evo, le maschere non si seppellivano più assieme al corpo, si conservavano come ricordi; inoltre si cercò di riprodurre in maniera sempre più fedele il volto del defunto. Si ricorse allora all’uso di calchi in cera o in gesso, applicati sulla faccia poco dopo la morte del soggetto da ritrarre: da questo negativo venivano poi prodotte le maschere funerarie vere e proprie. Si trattava di un processo che pochi si potevano permettere e dunque riservato a un’élite composta da nobili e sovrani – ma anche a personalità di spicco dell’arte, della letteratura o della filosofia. È grazie a questi calchi che oggi conosciamo con esattezza il volto di molti grandi del passato: Dante, Leopardi, Voltaire, Robespierre, Pascal, Newton e innumerevoli altri ancora.

La differenza con un ritratto dipinto o una scultura dal vivo è evidente: nelle maschere mortuarie non è possibile l’idealizzazione, lo scultore riproduce senza imbellettare, e ogni minimo difetto nel volto rimane impresso così come ogni grazia. Non soltanto, alcune maschere mostrano volti con fattezze già cadaveriche, occhi infossati, guance molli e cadenti, mascelle allentate. Con la sensibilità odierna ci si può domandare se sia davvero il caso di ricordare il defunto in questo stato – dubbio non soltanto moderno, visto che Eugène Delacroix aveva dato disposizioni affinché “dopo la sua morte dei suoi lineamenti non fosse conservata memoria”.

Eppure, se pensiamo che la fotografia post-mortem prenderà il posto delle maschere dalla fine del 1800, forse queste estreme, ultime immagini hanno un valore e un significato simbolico necessario. Possibile che ci raccontino qualcosa della persona a cui apparteneva quel volto? Il volto di un cadavere ci interroga sempre, pare nascondere un ambiguo segreto; quando poi si tratta del viso di un grande uomo, l’emozione è ancora più forte. Ci ricorda che la morte arriva per tutti, certo, ma segna anche la fine di una vita straordinaria, magari di un’epoca come nel caso della maschera mortuaria di Napoleone. E, soprattutto, riporta nomi celebri a una concretezza e una fisicità terrena che nessun dipinto, statua o addirittura fotografia potrà mai avere: si fanno segni della loro realtà storica, ci ricordano che questi uomini leggendari sono davvero passati di qui, hanno avuto un corpo come noi, e sono stati capaci di cambiare il mondo.

Se volete approfondire, questa pagina raccoglie molte delle principali maschere mortuarie con splendide foto; è anche consigliata una visita al Virtual Museum of Death Mask, più incentrato sulla tradizione russa, e che permette di confrontare le foto o i ritratti “in vita” e le maschere mortuarie di alcuni personaggi celebri.

Il volto e l’emozione

Quando nel 1806 Guillaume-Benjamin Duchenne nacque a Boulogne in una famiglia di umili pescatori, la prima cosa che fece sua madre, stringendolo al petto, fu sorridere. Non poteva sapere che il sorriso che le illuminava il volto sarebbe stato chiamato dagli studiosi sorriso Duchenne, proprio in onore di suo figlio.

In realtà, oltre che al sorriso, il nome Duchenne è ancora oggi legato a varie atrofie, distrofie e paralisi muscolari da lui individuate e studiate, così come a uno strumento chirurgico per l’asportazione di campioni di tessuti vivi da lui inventato: ma la sua fama è legata principalmente alle ricerche sulla neurofisiologia dell’emozione. Partendo dalle ricerche galvaniche, Duchenne mise a punto uno stimolatore elettrico faradico che, applicato a determinati punti della pelle, stimolava i muscoli sottostanti con enorme precisione. Praticamente questa tecnica (non invasiva) si basava sull’uso di elettrodi molto appuntiti che appoggiati all’epidermide facevano passare una piccola scossa elettrica, indolore ed estremamente localizzata. In questo modo riuscì a catalogare per primo tutti i muscoli della faccia umana, e non soltanto.

Utilizzando soggetti paralizzati, per essere sicuro che nessun movimento fosse volontario, Duchenne cominciò ad interessarsi al modo in cui i muscoli facciali vengono utilizzati per trasmettere emozioni. A seconda che siamo arrabbiati, felici, annoiati, spaventati, il nostro volto esprime questi stati d’animo con un complesso insieme di movimenti muscolari; Duchenne riuscì a “comporre” e catalogare queste espressioni emozionali con il suo apparecchio stimolatore ed essendo un appassionato di fotografia riuscì anche a documentare queste ricerche con una eccezionale serie di immagini.

Questo suo studio sulla fisiologia muscolare durò vent’anni, la missione di una vita. Fra le varie sorprese incontrate nel corso degli esperimenti, Duchenne trovò anche qualcosa che, per quanto non abbia un profondo valore scientifico, è rimasta una delle scoperte più curiose legate alla sua ricerca: la differenza fra un sorriso sincero e uno falso.

Duchenne si accorse che, quando stimolava elettricamente i suoi soggetti, non riusciva a ottenere da loro un sorriso convincente. Cosa mancava? Provò quindi a provocare con gli elettrodi un sorriso sul volto di un soggetto, e immediatamente dopo apostrofarlo con una battuta spiritosa, per confrontare quali muscoli si muovessero nel sorriso “indotto” e in quello spontaneo. E di colpo, capì.

Quando sorridiamo per cortesia (ma in realtà siamo annoiati), oppure per ingannare chi ci guarda facendogli credere che siamo felici, tutti i muscoli attorno alla bocca si attivano in maniera molto simile al sorriso naturale. Questo sorriso “bugiardo” difetta però di qualcosa:  sono i muscoli intorno agli occhi e alle sopracciglia, scoprì Duchenne, che si muovono soltanto se il sorriso è sincero e genuino. Provò quindi che il detto “ridere con gli occhi” era meno metaforico del previsto.

Nonostante i suoi metodi poco ortodossi, Duchenne rivoluzionò la conoscenza scientifica: è ricordato come uno dei più grandi medici del XIX Secolo e come il fondatore della neurologia. Se lo sapesse sua madre, come credete che sorriderebbe?

(Grazie, Marco!)

Elephant Man

Fra tutte le meraviglie umane, Joseph Carey Merrick rimane la più celebre e riconoscibile; la sua vicenda, adattata e portata sullo schermo da David Lynch nel 1980, ha commosso milioni di spettatori, oltre ad ispirare innumerevoli libri e pièces teatrali. Ma qual è la vera storia di questa enigmatica figura ottocentesca?

Joseph Merrick nacque il 5 Agosto 1862 a Leicester, figlio di Mary Jane e Joseph Rockley Merrick. Aveva un fratello e una sorella più piccoli, e rimase completamente normale fino ai tre anni di età. Poi, alcune cisti cominciarono ad apparire sul lato sinistro del suo corpo, simili a piccoli bernoccoli (come ricordava una nota autobiografica sul retro del pamphlet che Joseph utilizzava nei freakshow).

All’età di 12 anni, quando sua madre morì, la deformità di Joseph era già grave; suo padre si risposò, e la nuova matrigna cacciò Joseph di casa, costringendolo ad affrontare non soltanto un handicap fisico in continuo aumento, ma anche una vita fatta di fame e freddo. Dopo un periodo passato in strada vendendo lucido da scarpe, tormentato dai ragazzini e dai loro sberleffi, Joseph trovò lavoro in un freakshow, sotto il nome di “Uomo Elefante”. Così, esibendosi come fenomeno da baraccone, riuscì a mettere da parte una somma di denaro e ad essere trattato con un minimo di dignità. Durante uno dei suoi spettacoli, incontrò il dottor Frederick Treves, medico dell’ospedale di Whitechapel, che gli chiese di esaminarlo; Merrick rifiutò cortesemente, e Treves gli diede un suo biglietto da visita, casomai cambiasse idea.

Ma nel 1886 il Regno Unito dichiarò fuori legge i freakshow; non potendosi permettere il viaggio fino agli Stati Uniti (dove l’esibizione circense delle meraviglie umane sarebbe continuata fino ben oltre la metà del ‘900), Merrick si spostò in Belgio. Qui venne maltrattato, derubato ed abbandonato dal suo “manager”, e se ne ritornò in Inghilterra sconfortato.

Solo, senza casa, e con una grave infezione bronchiale, Merrick causò l’isteria della folla in una stazione ferroviaria a Liverpool Street, per via del suo fisico deforme e del panno con cui celava il suo viso. Quando le autorità lo fermarono, Joseph non poteva parlare per l’infezione bronchiale, ma riuscì a consegnare loro il biglietto da visita del Dottor Treves, che aveva conservato.

Quella fu la mossa giusta, e l’unica vera fortuna nella vita di Joseph Merrick. Il dottor Treves venne a tirarlo fuori dai pasticci, e si rivelò, in seguito, l’unico amico sincero che Joseph avrebbe mai avuto. Dispose che Merrick avesse una stanza permanente all’ospedale – per poterlo studiare, certo, ma anche per garantirgli la privacy e il decoro che spettavano ad ogni essere umano.

Anche se la sua vita era un continuo inferno di dolori fisici ed emotivi, Merrick possedeva uno spirito indomabile. In poco tempo si guadagnò la compassione pubblica e la simpatia dell’alta società vittoriana. Diventò una specie di celebrità. Alexandra, allora Principessa del Galles, dimostrò il suo interesse per Joseph, portando altri membri reali ad accoglierlo con entusiasmo. Joseph divenne addirittura un protetto della Regina Vittoria. Eppure il suo sogno, come avvalora la testimonianza di Treves, rimaneva quello di trovare una giovane donna non vedente, che potesse amarlo senza essere disgustata dalla sua apparenza fisica. Nei suoi ultimi anni, Merrick trovò conforto nella scrittura, componendo pagine di prosa e poesia, rimarchevoli per calore e commozione.

Il dottor Treves riuscì anche a regalargli qualche mese di vacanza in una villa di Fawsley Hall, Northamptonshire. Ma la sua breve vita volgeva al termine.Venne curato ed ospitato nell’ospedale fino alla sua morte, avvenuta a 27 anni, l’11 aprile del 1890. Morì per l’accidentale dislocazione del collo, dovuta all’impossibilità di sostenere il peso della sua enorme testa durante il sonno. Merrick infatti doveva dormire seduto, ma sembra che in quell’occasione avesse tentato di dormire sdraiato, per cercare di imitare un comportamento “normale”.

Lo scheletro deforme di Joseph Merrick è custodito all’interno del London Royal Hospital, anche se non è più visibile al pubblico.

I medici hanno dibattuto sulla sua sindrome per decenni: originariamente si pensava che Merrick soffrisse di elefantiasi. La seconda teoria si concentrò sulla neurofibromatosi di tipo I; nel 1986 si arrivò alla conclusione che l’Uomo Elefante soffrisse in realtà della Sindrome di Proteo, associata forse a una forma di neurofibromatosi. Recentemente, una ricerca appoggiata da Discovery Channel basata sul DNA di capelli e ossa, ha permesso di risalire al volto che Joseph Merrick avrebbe avuto se non fosse stato soggetto a questa incredibile e deturpante malattia. Il volto di un bel giovane, pieno di vita e di speranza. Un volto che non ha mai avuto la possibilità di vedere il mondo.

Gueules cassées

La Prima Guerra Mondiale fu un vero e proprio massacro. Ma il peggio non venne per chi restò sotto il fuoco delle prime mitragliatrici, o per chi rimase vittima dei gas o delle bombe. Molti furono così fortunati da salvarsi, e così sfortunati da tornare a casa con ferite assolutamente agghiaccianti. I ritardi nei soccorsi non fecero che peggiorare la situazione dei feriti, che spesso non si ripresero più integralmente.

Una categoria particolare di reduci con ferite di guerra è costituito dalle cosiddette gueules cassées, termine francese che significa pressappoco “facce fracassate”. Erano i militari che avevano riportato estese ferite al volto, e che erano per così dire “impresentabili” e dunque difficilmente reintegrabili nella società. Per la prima volta nella storia, però, la medicina aveva i mezzi per cercare di ovviare a questi incidenti. Stiamo parlando, qui, degli esordi pionieristici della chirurgia plastica ricostruttiva del maxillo-facciale. Sulla base di queste prime esperienze i chirurghi furono in grado di sviluppare un’esperienza che, affinatasi nel tempo, permette oggi di restituire una vita quasi normale a persone sfigurate. (È triste ammetterlo, ma questi soldati fecero anche inconsapevolmente da cavia per quelle tecniche che successivamente portarono alla chirurgia estetica vera e propria, quella delle labbra al silicone, del lifting o dei seni rifatti).

In questo blog abbiamo già parlato di terapie piuttosto crudeli relative agli albori della medicina. Quello che colpisce sempre nel riesaminare a distanza di quasi un secolo queste tecniche mediche primitive, è la scarsa considerazione che i medici sembravano avere della sofferenza del paziente. Confrontate i tentativi odierni di essere sempre meno invasivi, delicati, poco intrusivi, con queste tecniche antiquate: il dolore era qualcosa che andava sopportato, punto e basta, mentre i dottori cercavano di salvarti la pelle o migliorarti la vita.

Prendiamo ad esempio i sistemi per aprire la bocca del paziente. Molto spesso, dopo un trauma facciale, i muscoli della mascella rimanevano tirati e in tensione e aprire la bocca risultava impossibile. A seconda del grado di gravità, venivano utilizzati diversi sistemi. L’apri-bocca più comune era questo:

Si trattava di una sorta di morsa “al contrario” che veniva aperta gradualmente per allentare la tensione dei muscoli. Aveva effetti poco rilevanti nel tempo. Altri metodi, però, erano ancora più drastici e dolorosi.

Il “procedimento del sacco”, esposto dal dottor Pitsch nel 1916, è un esempio di terapia davvero brutale. Una volta trovato un interstizio tra i denti, due assicelle venivano inserite nella mascella del paziente.

Appena dischiuse le due pareti dentarie, un uncino veniva attaccato alla mascella inferiore e a questo veniva attaccato un sacco pieno di sassi o carbone il cui peso veniva velocemente aumentato per consentire l’apertura della bocca.

Il procedimento era dolorosissimo e non aveva effetti notevoli a lungo termine, perché i muscoli, troppo bruscamente e violentemente stirati, si ricontraevano poco dopo. Anche se la trazione veniva bilanciata da una banda che tratteneva il capo del paziente, le vertebre della nuca risentivano comunque dello stress.

Più complesso ancora era il caso dei volti sottoposti a un vero e proprio trauma che li aveva lasciati a brandelli e con ferite aperte. La protesi immediata veniva effettuata mediante maschere di contenimento che riportassero assieme i vari frammenti di volto, in modo che non si allontanassero ma anzi si fondessero assieme. L’idea era quella di cicatrizzare l’area più grande possibile, favorendo il consolidamento in buona posizione delle fratture, per permettere in seguito la riparazione delle parti lese. Il casco di Darcissac teneva insieme i diversi “pezzi” di faccia finché non si fossero riattaccati e cicatrizzati. L’intera procedura durava due o tre settimane, di immobilizzazione assoluta.

Passarono alcuni anni, prima che nel 1918 si arrivasse alla rivoluzionaria tecnica di Dufourmentel. Egli scoprì infatti che la pelle del cuoio capelluto reagiva meglio ed era più solida rispetto a quella del braccio. Tagliando quindi ampi lembi di pelle dal cranio dei pazienti, Dufourmentel riuscì a ricostruire elementi fino ad allora inapprocciabili della ricostruizione facciale. Ecco una mandibola “rimodellata” a partire dal cuio capelluto.

Anche gli italiani ebbero una parte in questa “corsa” alla ricostruzione dei volti dei reduci. I medici, infatti, provarono anche a ricorrere a una metodologia già inventata e spiegata addirittura nel XVI secolo dal chirurgo italiano Tagliacozzi, modificando qua e là il procedimento e le indicazioni di questo storico precursore. Questa tecnica si applicava soprattutto alle perdite moderate di tessuto nell’area nasale e del mento.

L’idea era quella di “rialzare” un lembo di pelle dal braccio, connetterlo al tessuto mancante del volto e lasciare che la pelle facesse il suo lavoro, “ricucendosi” con le parti mancanti. Ovviamente bisognava assicurarsi che il braccio fosse immobilizzato, per due o tre settimane, al fine di permettere la vascolarizzazione dei nuovi tessuti. Questa tecnica era stata, nei secoli precedenti, violentemente ostracizzata dalla Chiesa, a motivo della presunta interferenza con i piani del Creatore, e la Santa Sede dispose addirittura la riesumazione del Tagliacozzi e la sua sepoltura in terra non consacrata.

Infine la tecnica di ricostruzione prevedeva degli esperti dentisti che, a partire dai calchi del volto dei pazienti, progettavano e scolpivano protesi che potessero ridare loro la fisionomia perduta.

Le protesi alle volte includevano occhiali per dissimulare l’artificio.

Infine, ecco un raro filmato della Croce Rossa, datato 1918, in cui alcuni dottori e infermiere posizionano e controllano l’efficacia delle protesi facciali su alcuni reduci.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8epVBKiMmns]

Le tecnologie di ricostruzione del maxillo-facciale hanno da allora fatto un passo in avanti decisivo, e ad oggi costituiscono la fortuna di chirurghi plastici proprietari di atolli e isolotti, così come di onesti medici che cercano di ridare il sorriso e un’integrazione maggiore alle vittime di incidenti terribili.

Per ironia della sorte, la chirurgia estetica è nata proprio da uno dei più grandi e sanguinosi confilitti che il mondo abbia mai conosciuto.