Dirty Dick, The Man Who Stopped Washing

This article originally appeared on The LondoNerD, an Italian blog on the secrets of London.

I have about an hour to complete my mission.
Just out of Liverpool Street Station, I look around waiting for my eyes to adapt to the glaring street. The light is harsh, quite oddly indeed as those London clouds rest on the Victorian buildings like oilcloth. Or like a shroud, I find myself thinking — a natural free association, since I stand a few steps away from those areas (the 19th-Century slums of Whitchapel and Spitafield) where the Ripper was active.
But my mission has nothing to do with old Jack.
The job was assigned to me by The LondoNerD himself: knowing I would have a little spare time before my connection, he wrote me a laconic note:

You should head straight for Dirty Dicks. And go down in the toilets.

Now: having The LondoNerD as a friend is always a sure bet, when you’re in the City. He knows more about London than most of actual Londoners, and his advice is always valuable.
And yet I have to admit that visiting a loo, especially in a place called Dirty Dicks, is not a prospect which makes me sparkle with enthusiasm.

But then again, this proposal must conceal something that has to do with my interests. Likely, some macabre secret.
For those who don’t know me, that’s what I do for a living: I deal with bizarre and macabre stuff. My (very unserious) business card reads: Explorer of the Uncanny, Collector of Wonders.

The collection the card refers to is of course made of physical obejects, coming from ancient times and esotic latitudes, which I cram inside my cabinets; but it’s also a metaphore for the strange forgotten stories I have been collecting and retelling for many years — historical adecdotes proving how the world never really ceased to be an enchanted place, overflowing with wonders.

But enough, time is running out.

Taking long strides I move towards Dirty Dicks, at 202 Bishopsgate. And it’s not much of a surprise to find that, given the name on the signs, the pub’s facade is one of the most photographed by tourists, amidst chuckles and faux-Puritan winks.

The blackboard by the door remarks upon a too often ignored truth:

I am not at all paranoid (I couldn’t be, since I spend my time dealing with mummies, crypts and anatomical museums), but I reckon the advice is worth following.

Dirty Dicks’ interiors combine the classic English pub atmosphere with a singular, vintage and vaguely hipster design. Old prints hanging from the walls, hot-air-balloon wallpaper, a beautiful chandelier dangling through the bar’s two storeys.

I quickly order my food, and head towards the famous restrooms.

The toilets’ waiting room is glowing with a dim yellow light, but finally, there in the corner, I recognize the objective of my mission. The reason I was sent here.

A two-door cabinet, plunged in semi-obscurity, is decorated with a sign: “Nathaniel Bentley’s Artefacts”.

It is so dark in here that I can barely identify what’s inside the cabinet. (I try and take some pictures, but the sensor, pushed to the limit of its capabilities, only gives back blurred images — for which I apologize with the reader.)

Yes, I can make out a mummified cat. And there’s another one. They remind me of the dead cat and mouse found behind Christ Church‘s organ in Dublin, and displayed in that very church.

No mice here, as far as I can tell, but there’s a spooky withered squirrel watching me with its bulging little eyes.

There are several taxidermied animals, little birds, mammal skulls, old naturalistic prints, gaffs and chimeras built with different animal parts, bottles and vials with unspecified specimens floating in alcohol that’s been clouded for a very long time now.

What is this dusty and moldy cabinet of curiosities doing inside a pub? Who is Nathaniel Bentley, whom the sign indicates as the creator of the “artefacts”?

The story of this bizarre collection is strictly tied to the bar’s origins, and its infamous name.
Dirty Dicks has in fact lost (in a humorous yet excellent marketing choice) its ancient genitive apostrophe, referring to a real-life character.
Dirty Dick was the nickname of our mysterious Nathaniel Bentley.

Bentley, who lived in the 18th Century, was the original owner of the pub and also ran a hardware store and a warehouse adjacent to the inn. After a carefree dandy youth, he decided to marry. But, in the most dramatic twist of fate, his bride died on their wedding day.

From that moment on Nathaniel, plunged into the abyss of a desperate grief, gave up washing himself or cleaning his tavern. He became so famous for his grubbiness that he was nicknamed Dirty Dick — and knowing the degree of hygiene in London at the time, the filth on his person and in his pub must have been really unimaginable.
Letters sent to his store were simply addressed to “The Dirty Warehouse”. It seems that even Charles Dickens, in his Great Expectations, might have taken inspiration from Dirty Dick for the character of Miss Havisham, the bride left at the altar who refuses to take off her wedding dress for the rest of her life.

In 1804 Nathaniel closed all of his commercial activities, and left London. After his death in 1809 in Haddington, Lincolnshire, other owners took over the pub, and decided to capitalize on the famous urban legend. They recreated the look of the old squallid warehouse, keeping their bottles of liquor constantly covered in dust and cobwebs, and leaving around the bar (as a nice decor) those worn-out stuffed and mummified animals Dirty Dick never cared to throw in the trash.

Today that Dirty Dicks is all clean and tidy, and the only smell is of good cuisine, the relics have been moved to this cabinet near the toilets. As a reminder of one of the countless, eccentric and often tragic stories that punctuate the history of London.

Funny how times change. Once the specialty of the house was filth, now it’s the inviting and delicious pork T-bone that awaits me when I get back to my table.

And that I willingly tackle, just to ward off potential kidnappers.

The LondoNerD is an Italian blog, young but already full of wonderful insights: weird, curious and little-knowns stories about London. You can follow on Facebook and Twitter

Elephant Man

Fra tutte le meraviglie umane, Joseph Carey Merrick rimane la più celebre e riconoscibile; la sua vicenda, adattata e portata sullo schermo da David Lynch nel 1980, ha commosso milioni di spettatori, oltre ad ispirare innumerevoli libri e pièces teatrali. Ma qual è la vera storia di questa enigmatica figura ottocentesca?

Joseph Merrick nacque il 5 Agosto 1862 a Leicester, figlio di Mary Jane e Joseph Rockley Merrick. Aveva un fratello e una sorella più piccoli, e rimase completamente normale fino ai tre anni di età. Poi, alcune cisti cominciarono ad apparire sul lato sinistro del suo corpo, simili a piccoli bernoccoli (come ricordava una nota autobiografica sul retro del pamphlet che Joseph utilizzava nei freakshow).

All’età di 12 anni, quando sua madre morì, la deformità di Joseph era già grave; suo padre si risposò, e la nuova matrigna cacciò Joseph di casa, costringendolo ad affrontare non soltanto un handicap fisico in continuo aumento, ma anche una vita fatta di fame e freddo. Dopo un periodo passato in strada vendendo lucido da scarpe, tormentato dai ragazzini e dai loro sberleffi, Joseph trovò lavoro in un freakshow, sotto il nome di “Uomo Elefante”. Così, esibendosi come fenomeno da baraccone, riuscì a mettere da parte una somma di denaro e ad essere trattato con un minimo di dignità. Durante uno dei suoi spettacoli, incontrò il dottor Frederick Treves, medico dell’ospedale di Whitechapel, che gli chiese di esaminarlo; Merrick rifiutò cortesemente, e Treves gli diede un suo biglietto da visita, casomai cambiasse idea.

Ma nel 1886 il Regno Unito dichiarò fuori legge i freakshow; non potendosi permettere il viaggio fino agli Stati Uniti (dove l’esibizione circense delle meraviglie umane sarebbe continuata fino ben oltre la metà del ‘900), Merrick si spostò in Belgio. Qui venne maltrattato, derubato ed abbandonato dal suo “manager”, e se ne ritornò in Inghilterra sconfortato.

Solo, senza casa, e con una grave infezione bronchiale, Merrick causò l’isteria della folla in una stazione ferroviaria a Liverpool Street, per via del suo fisico deforme e del panno con cui celava il suo viso. Quando le autorità lo fermarono, Joseph non poteva parlare per l’infezione bronchiale, ma riuscì a consegnare loro il biglietto da visita del Dottor Treves, che aveva conservato.

Quella fu la mossa giusta, e l’unica vera fortuna nella vita di Joseph Merrick. Il dottor Treves venne a tirarlo fuori dai pasticci, e si rivelò, in seguito, l’unico amico sincero che Joseph avrebbe mai avuto. Dispose che Merrick avesse una stanza permanente all’ospedale – per poterlo studiare, certo, ma anche per garantirgli la privacy e il decoro che spettavano ad ogni essere umano.

Anche se la sua vita era un continuo inferno di dolori fisici ed emotivi, Merrick possedeva uno spirito indomabile. In poco tempo si guadagnò la compassione pubblica e la simpatia dell’alta società vittoriana. Diventò una specie di celebrità. Alexandra, allora Principessa del Galles, dimostrò il suo interesse per Joseph, portando altri membri reali ad accoglierlo con entusiasmo. Joseph divenne addirittura un protetto della Regina Vittoria. Eppure il suo sogno, come avvalora la testimonianza di Treves, rimaneva quello di trovare una giovane donna non vedente, che potesse amarlo senza essere disgustata dalla sua apparenza fisica. Nei suoi ultimi anni, Merrick trovò conforto nella scrittura, componendo pagine di prosa e poesia, rimarchevoli per calore e commozione.

Il dottor Treves riuscì anche a regalargli qualche mese di vacanza in una villa di Fawsley Hall, Northamptonshire. Ma la sua breve vita volgeva al termine.Venne curato ed ospitato nell’ospedale fino alla sua morte, avvenuta a 27 anni, l’11 aprile del 1890. Morì per l’accidentale dislocazione del collo, dovuta all’impossibilità di sostenere il peso della sua enorme testa durante il sonno. Merrick infatti doveva dormire seduto, ma sembra che in quell’occasione avesse tentato di dormire sdraiato, per cercare di imitare un comportamento “normale”.

Lo scheletro deforme di Joseph Merrick è custodito all’interno del London Royal Hospital, anche se non è più visibile al pubblico.

I medici hanno dibattuto sulla sua sindrome per decenni: originariamente si pensava che Merrick soffrisse di elefantiasi. La seconda teoria si concentrò sulla neurofibromatosi di tipo I; nel 1986 si arrivò alla conclusione che l’Uomo Elefante soffrisse in realtà della Sindrome di Proteo, associata forse a una forma di neurofibromatosi. Recentemente, una ricerca appoggiata da Discovery Channel basata sul DNA di capelli e ossa, ha permesso di risalire al volto che Joseph Merrick avrebbe avuto se non fosse stato soggetto a questa incredibile e deturpante malattia. Il volto di un bel giovane, pieno di vita e di speranza. Un volto che non ha mai avuto la possibilità di vedere il mondo.