Flesh and Dream: Anatomy of Surrealism

A few days ago I was invited to speak at the Rome Tatttoo Museum for Creative Mornings, a cultural event held every month around the world; it is a free and informal breakfast combined with a conference on a set theme, the same for all 196 cities in which the initiative takes place. January’s theme was SURREAL, and I therefore decided to talk about the relationship between anatomy and surrealism. Here is the revised transcription of my speech.

Brussels, 1932.
Near the railway station the annual Foire du Midi is held, gahtering in the capital all the traveling carnivals that tour Belgium.


Our protagonist is this man, just over thirty years old, who’s wandering around the fair and looking at the various attractions until his gaze is captured by a poster advertising Dr. Spitzner’s anatomical museum.

Dr. Spitzner is not even a real doctor, rather an anatomist who tried to set up a museum in Paris; he did not succeed, and started traveling with the carnival. His collection, behind a pedagogical façade (the museum is supposed to inform the public about the risks related to venereal diseases or alcohol abuse), is designed above all to arouse the audience’s mobrid curiosity and voyeurism.


The first thing that attracts the attention of our man is a beautiful wax sculpture of a sleeping woman: a mechanism makes her raise and lower her chest, as if she were breathing. The man pays the ticket and enters the sideshow. But past the red velvet curtains, a vision of wonder and horror appears before his eyes. Pathological waxes show the ravages of syphilis, monstrous bodies like those of the Tocci siamese twins are represented along scenes of surgical operations. Women appear to be operated by “phantom” hands, without arms or bodies. The same sleeping Venus seen at the entrance is dismantled under the eyes of the public, organ after organ, in a sort of spectacular dissection.

The man is upset, and the vision of the Spitzner museum will forever change his life.
In fact, our protagonist is called Paul Delvaux, a painter who until then has only painted post-impressionist (yet quite unimpressive!) bucolic landscapes.

After his visit to the Spitzner museum, however, his art will take a completely different path.
His paintings will turn into dreamlike visions, in which almost all the elements seem to refer to that original trauma or, better, to that original epiphany. The strange non-places which the figures inhabit seem to be suspended halfway between De Chirico‘s metaphysical landscapes and the fake neoclassical sceneries used in fairgrounds; his paintings are populated with sleeping venuses and female nudes, showing a cold and hieratic eroticism, and dozens of skeletons; the train station will become another of Delvaux’s obsessions.

Regarding that experience Delvaux will declare, many years later:

That disturbing, even a little morbid atmosphere, the unusual exhibition of anatomical waxes in a place meant for  joy, noise, lights, joviality […] All this has left deep traces in my life for a very long time. The discovery of the Spitzner museum made me veer completely in my conception of painting.

(cited in H. Palouzié e C. Ducourau, De la collection Fontana à la collection Spitzner, In Situ [En ligne], n.31, 2017)

But why was Delvaux so touched by the vision of the inside of the human body?
In Bananas (1971), Woody Allen wakes up after taking a blow on the head, and upon touching the wound he looks at his fingers and exclaims: “Blood! That should be on inside”. I believe this to bethe most concise definition of anatomy as a Freudian repression/denial.


What is inside the body should remain off-scene (obscene). We should never see it, because otherwise it would mean that something went wrong. The inside of our body is a misunderstood territory and a real taboo – we will later attempt to see why.
So of course, there is a certain fascination for the obscene, especially for a man like Delvaux who came from a rigid and puritan family; a mixture of erotic impulses and death.


But there’s more: those waxes have a quality that goes beyond reality. What Delvaux experienced is the surrealism of anatomy.
In fact, whenever we enter an anatomical museum, we’re accessing a totally alien, unsettling, absurd dimension.

It is therefore not surprising that the Surrealists, to whom Delvaux was close, exploited anatomy to destabilize their audience: surrealists were constantly searching for this type of elements, and experiences, which could free the unconscious.
Surrealism also had a fascination for death, right from its very beginnings. One example is the Poisson soluble, Breton‘s syllogy which accompanied the Manifesto (the idea of a “soluble fish” can make us smile, but is in truth desperately dramatic), another is the famous creative game of the “exquisite corpse“.
The Surrealist Manifesto stated it very clearly: “Surrealism will introduce you to Death, which is a secret society”.

So Max Ernst in his collage wroks for Une semaine de bonté often used scraps of anatomical illustrations; Roland Topor cut and peeled his characters with Sadeian cruelty, hinting at the menacing monsters of the unconscious lurking under our skin; Réné Magritte covered his two lovers’ faces with a cloth, as if they were already corpses on the autopsy table, thus giving the couple a funereal aspect.

But Hans Bellmer above all put anatomy at the core of his lucid expressive universe, first with his series of photos of his handcrafted ball-joint dolls, with which he reinvented the female body; and later in his etchings, where the various anatomical details merge and blur into new configurations of flesh and dream. All of Bellmer’s art is obsessively and fetishly aimed at discovering the algorithm that makes the female body so seductive (the “algebra of desire”, according to its own definition).

In the series of lithographs entitled Rose ouverte la nuit, in which a girl lifts the skin of her abdomen to unveil her internal organs, Bellmer is directly referring to the iconography of terracotta/wax anatomical models, and to ancient medical illustrations.

This idea that the human body is a territory to explore and map, is directly derived from the dawn of the anatomical discipline. The first one who cut this secret space open for study purposes, at least in a truly programmatic way, was Vesalius. I have often written about him, and to understand the extent of his revolution you might want to check out this article.

Yet even after Vesalio the feelings of guilt attached to the act of dissection did not diminish – opening a human body was still seen as a desecration.
According to various scholars, this sense of guilt is behind the “vivification” of the écorchés, the flayed cadavers represented in anatomical plates, which were shown in plastic poses as if they were alive and perfectly well – an iconography partly borrowed from that of the Catholic saints, always eager to exhibit the mutilations they suffered during martyrdom.

In the anatomical plates of the 17th and 18th centuries, this tendency becomes so visionary as to become involuntarily fantasy-like (see R. Caillois, Au cœur du fantastique, 1965).
A striking example is the following illustration (from the Historia de la composicion del cuerpo humano by Valverde, 1556) showing a dissected cadaver which in turn is dissecting another one: surrealism ante litteram, and a quite extraordinary macabre fantasy.

At the time scholars were quite aware of the aesthetic problem: two of the greatest anatomists of the late 17th century, Govert Bidloo and Frederik Ruysch, became bitter enemies precisely because they disagreed on which kind of aesthetics was more suitable for the anatomical discipline.


Bidloo, in his treatises, had ordered the illustrations to be as realistic as possible. Dissection was shown in a very graphic way, with depictions of tied bodies and fixing pins. This was no idealized view at all, as realism was pushed to the extreme in a plate which even included a fly landing on the corpse.

On the other hand, Ruysch’s sensibility was typical of wunderkammern, and as he embellished his animal preparations with compositions of shells and corals, he did so also with human preparations, to make them more pleasing to the eye.

His anatomical preparations were artistic, sometimes openly allegorical; his now-lost dioramas were quite famous in this regard, as they were made entirely from organic materials (kidney stones used as rocks, arteries and dried veins as trees, fetal skeletons drying their tears on handkerchiefs made from meninges, etc.).

Often the preserved parts were embellished with laces and embroidery made by Ruysch’s daughter Rachel, who from an early age helped her father in his dissections (she can be seen standing on the right with a skeleton in her hand in Van Neck‘s Anatomy Lesson by Dr. Frederik Ruysch).

We could say that Ruysch was both an anatomist and a showman (therefore, a forerunner of that Dr. Spitzner whose museum so impressed Delvaux), who exploited his own art in a spectacular way in order to gain success in European courts. And in a sense he won his dispute with Bidloo, because the surreal quality of anatomical illustrations remained almost unchallenged until the advent of positivism.

Going back to the 1900s, however, things start to radically change from the middle of the century. Two global conflicts have undermined trust in mankind and in history; traditional society begins breaking down, technology enters the people’s homes and work becomes more and more mechanized. Thus a sense of loss of idenity, which also involves the body, begins to emerge.


If in the 1930s Fritz Kahn (above) could still look at anatomy with an engineering gaze, as if it were a perfect machine, in the second half of the century everything was wavering. The body becomes mutant, indefinite, fluid,  as is the case in Xia Xiaowan‘s glass paintings, which change depending on the perspective, making the subject’s anatomy uncertain.

Starting from the 60s and the 70s, the search for identity implies a reappropriation of the body as a canvas on which to express one’s own individuality: it is the advent of body art and of the customization of the body (plastic surgery, tattoos, piercing).
The body becomes victim of hybridizations between the organic and the mechanical, oscillating between dystopian visions of flesh and metal fused together – as in Tetsuo or Cronenberg’s films – and cyberpunk prophecies, up to the tragic dehumanization of a fully mechanized society depicted by Tetsuya Ishida.

In spite of millenarians, however, the world does not end in the year 2000 nor in the much feared year 2012. Society continues to change, and hybridization is a concept that has entered the collective unconscious; an artist like Nunzio Paci can now use it in a non-dystopian perspective, guided by ecological concerns. He is able to intersect human anatomy with the animal and plant kingdom in order to demonstrate our intimate communion and continuity with nature; just like Kate McDowell does in her ceramics works.

The anatomical and scientific imagery becomes disturbing, on the other hand, in the paintings of Spanish artist Dino Valls, whose characters appear to be victims of esoteric experiments, continually subjected to invasive examinations, while their tear-stained eyes suggest a tragic, ancestral and repeated dimension.

Photographer Joel-Peter Witkin used the body – both the imperfect and different body, and the anatomized body, literally cut into pieces – to represent the beauty of the soul in an aesthetic way. A Catholic fervent, Witkin is truly convinced that “everything is illuminated”, and his research has a mystical quality. Looking for the divine even in what scares us or horrifies us, his aim is to expose our substantial identity with God. This might be the meaning of one of his most controversial works, The Kiss, in which the two halves of a severed head are positioned as if kissing each other: love is to recognize the divine in the other, and every kiss is nothing but God loving himself. (Here you can find my interview with Witkin – Italian only.)

Valerio Carrubba‘s works are more strictly surrealistic, and particularly interesting because they bring the pictorial medium closer to its anatomical content: the artist creates different versions of the same picture one above the other, adding layers of paint as if they were epidermal layers, only the last of which remains visible.

Anatomy’s still-subversive power is testified by its widespread use within the current of pop surrealism, often creating a contrast between childish and lacquered images and the anatomical unveiling.

Also our friend Stefano Bessoni makes frequent reference to anatomy, in particular in one of his latest works which is dedicated to the figure of Rachel, the aforementioned daughter of Ruysch.

Much in the same satirical and rebellious vein is the work of graffiti artist Nychos, who anatomizes, cuts into pieces and exposes the entrails of some of the most sacred icons of popular culture.
Jessica Harrison reserves a similar treatment to granma’s china, and Fernando Vicente uses the idea of vanitas to spoof the sensual imagery of pin-up models.

And the woman’s body, the most subject to aesthetic imperatives and social pressures, is the focus of Sally Hewett‘s work, revolving around those anatomical details that are usually considered unsightly – surgical scars, cellulite, stretch marks – in order to reaffirm the beauty of imperfection.

Autopsy, the act of “looking with one’s own eyes”, is the first step in empirical knowledge.
But looking at one’s own body involves a painful and difficult awareness: it also means acknowledging its mortality. In fact, the famous maxim inscribed in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, “Know thyself“, was essentially a memento mori (as evidenced by the mosaic from the Convent of San Gregorio on the Appian Way). It meant “know who you are, understand your limits, remember your finitude”.

This is perhaps the reason why blood “should be on the inside”, and why our inner landscape of organs, adipose masses and vascularized tissues still seems so unfamiliar, so disgusting, so surreal. We do not want to think about it because it reminds us of our unfortunate reality of limited, mortal animals.

But our very identity can not exist without this body, though fleeting and fallible; and our denial of anatomy, in turn, is exactly the reason why artists will continue to explore its imagery.
Because the best art is subversive, one that – as in Banksy’s famous definition – should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfotable.

Bobby Yeah

Robert Morgan, classe 1974, è nato e cresciuto a Yateley, città – a quanto dice lui – infestata dai fantasmi. Oggi vive a Londra, ma le cose non sono molto cambiate: ora è il suo appartamento ad essere abitato dagli spettri.
A parte questi disagi, cui bisogna rassegnarsi se si risiede nel Regno Unito, Morgan è un filmmaker multipremiato e apprezzato da pubblico e critica. I suoi lavori sono cupi e inquietanti, spesso velatamente autobiografici: il suo Monsters (2004), ad esempio, nasce dai ricordi d’infanzia di Robert quando con la famiglia si trasferì nei pressi di un manicomio.

Ma è con Bobby Yeah (2011) che Morgan si fa conoscere a livello internazionale. Questo cortometraggio viene nominato ai prestigiosi BAFTA, proiettato al Sundance e riceve premi un po’ ovunque. Si tratta di un film d’animazione a tecnica mista – ma più di questo non possiamo dirvi. Quello che accade in Bobby Yeah dovrete scoprirlo da soli, anche perché difficilmente troveremmo le parole adeguate per descrivere questo piccolo, folle gioiello. Quando pensate che la fantasia disturbata dell’autore abbia raggiunto il suo culmine, e che nulla di più oltraggiosamente osceno possa succedere, regolarmente succede.

La pagina Wiki su Robert Morgan cita, fra gli artisti che l’hanno influenzato, Bacon, Poe, Lynch, Cronenberg, Witkin e Bellmer. Certo, in trasparenza si intravede tutto questo; eppure probabilmente nessuno di questi signori ha mai partorito qualcosa di altrettanto weird e malato. Ecco il trailer di Bobby Yeah.

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaS_S5Gt7L0]

[AGGIORNAMENTO] Il cortometraggio non è più disponibile in versione integrale su YouTube. E’ visionabile on-demand sul sito ufficiale di Robert Morgan, al prezzo di un dollaro.

(Grazie, Paolo!)

Speciale: Fotografare la morte – III

paris---joel-peter-witkin---vernissage-a0300-la-bnf-26-03-2012

Joel-Peter Witkin è ritenuto uno dei maggiori e più originali fotografi viventi, assurto negli anni a vera e propria leggenda della fotografia moderna. È nato a Brooklyn nel 1939, da padre ebreo e madre cattolica, che si separarono a causa dell’inconciliabilità delle loro posizioni religiose. Fin da giovane, quindi, Witkin conobbe la profonda influenza dei dilemmi della fede. Come ha più volte raccontato, un altro episodio fondamentale fu assistere ad un incidente stradale, mentre un giorno, da bambino, andava a messa con sua madre e suo fratello; nella confusione di lamiere e di grida, il piccolo Joel si trovò improvvisamente da solo e vide qualcosa rotolare verso di lui. Era la testa di una giovane ragazzina. Joel si chinò per carezzarle il volto, parlarle e rasserenarla, ma prima che potesse allungare una mano qualcuno lo portò via.
In questo aneddoto seminale sono già contenute alcune di quelle che diverranno vere e proprie ossessioni tematiche per Witkin: lo spirito, la compassione per la sofferenza e la ricerca della purezza attraverso il superamento di ciò che ci spaventa.

Dopo essersi laureato in discipline artistiche, ed aver iniziato la sua carriera come fotografo di guerra in Vietnam, nel 1982 Witkin ottiene il permesso di scattare alcune fotografie a dei preparati anatomici, e riceve in prestito per 24 ore una testa umana sezionata longitudinalmente. Witkin decide di posizionare le due metà gemelle nell’atto di baciarsi: l’effetto è destabilizzante e commovente, come se il momento della morte fosse un’estrema conciliazione con il sé, un riconoscere la propria parte divina e finalmente amarla senza riserve.

the-kiss-le-baiser-new-mexico-joel-peter-witkin

The Kiss è lo scatto che rende il fotografo di colpo celebre, nel bene e nel male: se da una parte alcuni critici comprendono subito la potente carica emotiva della fotografia, dall’altra molti gridano allo scandalo e la stessa Università, appena scopre l’uso che ha fatto del preparato, decide che Witkin è persona non grata.
Egli si trasferisce quindi nel Nuovo Messico, dove può in ogni momento attraversare il confine ed aggirare così le stringenti leggi americane sull’utilizzo di cadaveri. Da quel momento il lavoro di Witkin si focalizza proprio sulla morte, e sui “diversi”.

tumblr_l7xk5hk26r1qc3atx

Joel-Peter-Witkin-9

Lavorando con cadaveri o pezzi di corpi, con modelli transessuali, mutilati, nani o affetti da diverse deformità, Witkin crea delle barocche composizioni di chiara matrice pittorica (preparate con maniacale precisione a partire da schizzi e bozzetti), spesso reinterpretando grandi opere di maestri rinascimentali o importanti episodi religiosi.

joel-peter-witkin-7

Joel-Peter-Witkin-19

Witkin Archive
Scattate rigorosamene in studio, dove ogni minimo dettaglio può essere controllato a piacimento dall’artista, le fotografie vengono poi ulteriormente lavorate in fase di sviluppo, nella quale Witkin interviene graffiando la superficie delle foto, disegnandoci sopra, rovinandole con acidi, tagliando e rimaneggiando secondo una varietà di tecniche per ottenere il suo inconfondibile bianco e nero “anticato” alla maniera di un vecchio dagherrotipo.

Nonostante i soggetti scabrosi ed estremi, lo sguardo di Witkin è sempre compassionevole e “innamorato” della sacralità della vita. Anche la fiducia che i suoi soggetti gli accordano, nel venire fotografati, è proprio da imputarsi alla sincerità con cui egli ricerca i segni del divino anche nei fisici sfortunati o differenti: Witkin ha il raro dono di far emergere una sensualità e una purezza quasi sovrannaturale dai corpi più strani e contorti, catturando la luce che pare emanare proprio dalle sofferenze vissute. Cosa ancora più straordinaria, egli non ha bisogno che il corpo sia vivo per vederne, e fotografarne, l’accecante bellezza.

Ecco le nostre cinque domande a Joel-Peter Witkin.

Witkin-harvest-1984
1. Perché hai deciso che era importante raffigurare la morte nei tuoi lavori fotografici?

La morte è parte della vita di ognuno di noi. La morte è anche il grande discrimine fra la fede umana e gli aspetti terreni, temporali – è il sonno senza tempo, per chi è religioso, è la vita eterna assieme a Dio.

Witkin Archive

2. Quale credi che sia lo scopo, se ce n’è uno, delle tue fotografie post-mortem? Stai soltanto fotografando i corpi, o sei alla ricerca di qualcos’altro?

Fotografare la morte e i resti umani è sempre un “lavoro sacro”. Quello che fotografo, coloro che ritraggo, in realtà siamo sempre noi stessi. Io vedo la bellezza nei soggetti che fotografo.

joel-peter-witkin-1996
3. Come succede per tutto ciò che mette alla prova il nostro rifiuto della morte, il tono macabro e sconvolgente delle tue fotografie potrebbe essere visto da alcuni come osceno e irrispettoso. Ti interessa scioccare il pubblico, e come ti poni nei riguardi della carica di tabù presente nei tuoi soggetti?

I grandi dipinti e la scultura del passato hanno sempre affrontato il tema della morte. Amo dire che “la morte è come il pranzo – sta arrivando!”. Un tempo la gente nasceva e moriva nella propria casa. Oggi nasciamo e moriamo in apposite istituzioni. Portiamo tutti un numero tatuato sul nostro polso. Muoriamo soli.
Quindi, ovviamente, le persone rimangono sconvolte nel vedere, in un certo senso, il loro stesso volto. Credo che nulla dovrebbe mai essere tabù. In realtà quando sono abbastanza privilegiato da riuscire a fotografare la morte, resto solitamente molto toccato dallo spirito che è ancora presente nei corpi di quelle persone.

Witkin Archive

B017634

4. È stato difficile approcciare i cadaveri, a livello personale? C’è qualche aneddoto particolare o interessante riguardo le circostanze di una tua foto?

Quando ho fotografato “l’uomo senza testa”, (Man Without A Head, un cadavere, seduto su una sedia all’obitorio, la cui testa era stata rimossa a scopo di ricerca) lui indossava dei calzetti neri. Quel dettaglio rese il tutto un po’ più personale. Il dottore, il suo assistente ed io alzammo quest’uomo morto dal tavolo settorio e posizionammo il suo corpo su una sedia di acciaio. Dovetti lavorare un po’ con il cadavere, per bilanciare le sue braccia in modo che non cadesse per terra. Alla fine, nella foto, il pavimento era tutto ricoperto dal sangue fluito dal suo collo, dove la testa era stata tagliata. Gli fui molto grato di aver lavorato con me.

BL10629

joel-peter-witkin-10

5. Riguardo alle foto post-mortem, ti piacerebbe che te ne venisse scattata una dopo che sei morto? Come ti immagini una simile foto?

Ho già preso provvedimenti affinché i miei organi siano rimossi dopo la mia morte per aiutare chi ancora è in vita. Qualsiasi cosa rimanga, verrà seppellita in un cimitero militare, visto che sono un veterano dell’esercito. Quindi temo che mi perderò l’occasione di cui mi chiedi!

P.S. Io non voglio “mantenere bizzarro il mondo” (un riferimento allo slogan del nostro blog, n.d.r.)… voglio renderlo più amorevole!

med_witkin-1-jpg

Joel-Peter-Witkin-23

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – V

Alberto Zanchetta

FRENOLOGIA DELLA VANITAS – Il teschio nelle arti visive

(2011, Johan & Levi)

Vita, miracoli e morte del teschio. Lo splendido volume di Alberto Zanchetta racconta la storia di una trasformazione. Attraverso un unico elemento simbolico, l’effigie del teschio nella storia dell’arte, e seguendone le mutazioni di senso e di significato nel corso dei secoli, ci parla di come la nostra stessa sensibilità abbia cambiato forma con il passare del tempo. Da icona funebre a dettaglio centrale delle vanitas, fino alla moderna ubiquità che ne fa vacua decorazione e ne appiattisce ogni forza oscena, il teschio ha accompagnato dalla preistoria fino ad oggi la nostra cultura: vero e proprio specchio, le cui orbite vuote fissano l’osservatore spingendolo a meditare sull’inesorabilità del tempo e sulla morte. Come si sono serviti gli artisti di questo prodigioso elemento iconografico? Quando e perché è cambiato il suo utilizzo dal Medioevo ad oggi? C’è il rischio che l’attuale proliferare indiscriminato dei teschi, dalla moda, ai tatuaggi, ai graffiti, possa renderli “innocui” e alla lunga privarci di un simbolo forte e antico quanto l’uomo? L’autore ripercorre questa particolare storia esaminando e approfondendo di volta in volta tematiche e autori distanti fra loro nel tempo e nello spazio: da Basquiat a Cézanne, da Picasso a Witkin, da Mapplethorpe a Hirst (per citarne solo alcuni). Abbiamo parlato di tanto in tanto, qui su Bizzarro Bazar, di come la morte sia stata negata e occultata nell’ultimo secolo in Occidente; e di come oggi la sua spettacolarizzazione tenda a renderla ancora meno reale, più immaginata, pensata cioè per immagini. Zanchetta aggiunge un tassello importante a questa idea, con il suo resoconto di un simbolo che era un tempo essenziale, e si presenta ormai stanco e abusato.

Bill Bass e Jon Jefferson

LA VERA FABBRICA DEI CORPI

(2006, TEA)

Non lasciatevi ingannare dalla fuorviante traduzione del titolo originale (che si riferisce invece alla “fattoria dei corpi”). Il libro di Bass e Jefferson non parla né di androidi né di clonazioni, ma della nascita e dello sviluppo della rete di cosiddette body farms americane, fondate dallo stesso Bass: strutture universitarie in cui si studia la decomposizione umana a fini scientifici e, soprattutto, forensici. Il lavoro e la specializzazione del professor Bass è infatti comprendere, a partire da resti umani, la data e/o l’ora esatta della morte, nonché le modalità del decesso. Per raggiungere la precisione necessaria a scagionare o accusare un imputato di omicidio, gli antropologi forensi hanno dovuto comprendere a fondo come si “comporta” un cadavere in tutte le situazioni immaginabili, come reagisce agli elementi esterni, quale fauna entomologica si ciba dei resti e in quale successione temporale si avvicendano le ondate di larve e insetti. Nelle body farms, un centinaio di cadaveri all’anno vengono lasciati alle intemperie, bruciati, immersi nell’acqua, nel ghiaccio… Negli anni il dottor Bass ha ottenuto una serie di risultati decisivi per far luce su innumerevoli misteri, confluiti in un archivio consultato da tutte le polizie del mondo. Questo simpatico vecchietto oggi, guardando i resti di un cadavere, riesce a capire in breve tempo come è morto, se è stato spostato dopo la morte, da quanto tempo, eccetera.

Questo libro è uno di quelli che si leggono tutti d’un fiato, e per più di un motivo. Innanzitutto, lo stile scorrevole e semplice degli autori non è privo di una buona dose di umorismo, che aiuta a “digerire” anche i dettagli più macabri. In secondo luogo, le informazioni scientifiche sono precise e sorprendenti: non potremmo immaginare in quanti e quali modi un cadavere possa “mentire” riguardo alle sue origini, finché Bass non ci confessa tutte le false piste in cui è caduto, gli errori commessi, le situazioni senza apparente spiegazione in cui si è ritrovato. Perché La vera fabbrica dei corpi è anche un libro giallo, a suo modo, e racconta le investigazioni svoltesi in diversi casi celebri di cronaca nera. E, infine, il grande valore di queste pagine è quello di raccontarci una vita avventurosa, strana e particolare, di caccia ai killer, in stretto contatto quotidiano con la morte; la vita di un uomo che dichiara di conoscere ormai fin troppo bene il suo destino, e dice di trovare conforto nell’idea che, una volta morto, vivrà negli esseri che si sfameranno con il suo corpo. Un uomo dalla voce ironica e pacata che, nonostante tutti questi anni, continua “ad odiare le mosche”.

Strane macchine fotografiche

Wayne Martin Belger, nato nel 1964, ha un curriculum che si potrebbe definire perlomeno eclettico: ha fatto il cercatore di tesori professionista, l’istruttore di roccia così come di scuba diving, il musicista, il giocatore di hockey, il guidatore di treni e il manicure. Ma ora pare aver trovato la sua strada.

Le macchine fotografiche che costruisce sono le più incredibili al mondo. Si tratta di apparecchi stenoscopici, vale a dire fotocamere che sfruttano il concetto di camera oscura nel momento dello scatto. La fotocamera utilizza un foro stenopeico (dal greco stenos opaios, dotato di uno stretto foro), in pratica un semplice foro posizionato al centro di un lato della fotocamera, come obiettivo. La pellicola viene impressionata dalla luce che penetra nel foro. Per far sì che l’immagine sia nitida, è necessario un tempo di esposizione di quasi due ore.

Ma non è questo che rende le sue macchine fotografiche particolari. Wayne Belger, infatti, le costruisce a seconda del soggetto che dovrà fotografare. Lo strumento diviene una sorta di “altare” magico che permette di catturare l’essenza stessa dell’oggetto della foto. Ecco allora che le sue fotocamere diventano degli ibridi postmoderni di metallo, legno e materia organica.

Facciamo un esempio: volendo fotografare delle donne all’ottavo mese di gravidanza, Belger progetta e costruisce una macchina stenoscopica che contiene al suo interno il cuore (vero) di un bambino.

heart_front1heart_backheart_close

Questo gli permette di rendere “sacro” il suo strumento, e visto che i tempi di esposizione sono così lunghi, di trasformare l’atto di fotografare in un rituale che unisce, come in un procedimento alchemico, la luce e il tempo. Ecco alcune delle foto scattate con questa macchina fotografica:

photo02photo03photo07

Altri esempi: per una serie di fotografie che ritraggono preti, imam o rabbini in preghiera, Berger ha costruito una macchina fotografica che contiene al suo interno parti della Bibbia, del Corano, della Torah, e un pezzo metallico che faceva parte dell’armatura architettonica delle Torri Gemelle.

Un altro pezzo della sua collezione è ricavato dal teschio autentico di una ragazzina di 13 anni, nel quale il foro per le fotografie è stato praticato all’incirca all’altezza del famoso Terzo Occhio della mistica orientale.

3rd_eye-front3rdeye_front_close3rdeye_quarter3rd_eye-photo013rd_eye-photo02

Ma lo strumento probabilmente più bizzarro ed estremo è la cosiddetta untouchable camera (“la macchina fotografica intoccabile”). Si tratta di un pezzo realizzato per una serie di fotografie di malati di AIDS. Belger ha disegnato questo apparecchio, che al posto dei comuni filtri fotografici ha delle lastre di vetro contenenti il sangue positivo all’HIV dei suoi soggetti. Attraverso il loro stesso sangue infetto, Belger ha dunque fotografato, mettendoli in posa per due ore, alcuni malati, ottenendo fotografie suggestive ed evocative. Sono scatti forti, potenti, reminiscenti di certo dell’opera di Witkin, ma ancora più commoventi se si pensa al metodo quasi “religioso” con cui sono stati ottenuti.

hiv_leftphoto01hivphoto02

Ecco il link al sito di Wayne Martin Belger.