Cool 3D World

The Web coined a new vocabulary, gave birth to its own expressive instances, even elaborated an unprecedented kind of humor. With regard to “the weird“, internet users had an exceptional training ground: the now-defunct Vine platform. Here videos had to be 6-second-long, so an original and very complex aesthetic began to take form. In order to make their videos incisive, users had to come up with unsettling narrative tricks: an intelligent use of off-screen space, cross references, brilliantly interrupted climax, shock and surprise.

This was the perfect environment for New York musician and digital artist Brian Tessler, and his accomplice Jon Baken, to create their original and hugely successful project Cool 3D World.

Cool 3D World videos present the viewer with alienating situations, in which monstrous beings perform esoteric and incomprehensible actions. Through the paroxysmal distortion of their characters’ facial features (stretched or compressed to the limit of modeling possibilities, with effects that would normally be considered errors in classical 3D animation) and the build-up of illogical situations, Tessler & Baken plunge us into a sick world where anything can happen. In this universe, any unpleasant detail can hide mystical and psychedelic abysses. This is a hallucinated, exhilarating, disturbing reality yet sometimes its madness gives way to some unexpectedly poetic touches.

What sets apart the Cool 3D World duo from other artists coming from the “weird side” of the internet is their care for the visual aspect, which is always deliberately poised between the professional and the amateur, and for the alwyas great sound department curated by Tessler.
The result is some kind of animated couterpart to Bizarro Fiction; every new release raises the bar of the previous one and — despite the obvious attempt to package the perfect viral product — Cool 3D World never falls back on a repetitive narrative.

Today, Cool 3D World has a YouTube channel, an Instagram account and a Facebook page. Recently Tessler & Baken started a partnership with Adult Swim, and began experimenting with longer formats.
Here is a selection of some of their best works,.

A Happy 2019… With A Nice Surprise!

Happy New Year!

To boost-start this new trip around the sun, I’d like to reveal the secret project I have been absorbed in for the last few months… the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series!

Produced in collaboration with Theatrum Mundi (Luca Cableri’s wunderkammer in Arezzo) and Onda Videoproduzioni, and directed by Francesco Erba, the series will take you on a journey through strange scientific experiments, eccentric characters, stories on the edge of impossible, human marvels — in short, everything what you might expect from Bizzarro Bazar.

Working on this project has been a new experience for me, certainly exciting and — I won’t deny it — rather demanding. But it seems to me that the finished product is quite good, and I am very curious to know your reactions, and to see what effect it will have on an audience that is less accustomed to strange topics than the readers of this blog.
In case you’re wandering: all episodes will be captioned in English. I’ll post them on here too, but if you want to make sure you don’t miss an episode you can follow my Facebook page and especially subscribe to my YouTube channel, which would make me really happy (numbers count).
And above all, if you happen to like the videos, please consider sharing them and spreading the word!

So, along with my best wishes for the new year, here’s a sneak peak of the opening credits for the weirdest web series of 2019 — coming soon, very soon.

Death 2.0

Considerations about death in the age of social media

Chart

Take a look at the above Top Chart.
Blackbird is a Beatles song originally published in the 1968 White Album.
Although Paul McCartney wrote it 46 years ago, last week the song topped the iTunes charts in the Rock genre. Why?
The answer is below:

Italian articles about “daddy Blackbird”.

Chris Picco lives in California: he lost his wife Ashley, who died prematurely giving birth to litle Lennon. On November 12 a video appeared on YouTube showing Chris singing Blackbird before the incubator where his son was struggling for life; the child died just four days after birth.
The video went immediately viral, soon reaching 15 million views, bouncing from social neworks to newspapers and viceversa, with great pariticipation and a flood of sad emoticons and moving comments. This is just the last episode in a new, yet already well-established tendency of public exhibitions of suffering and mourning.

Brittany Maynard (1984-2014), terminally ill, activist for assisted suicide rights.

A recent article by Kelly Conaboy, adressing the phenomenon of tragic videos and stories going viral, uses the expression grief porn: these videos may well be a heart-felt, sincere display to begin with, but they soon become pure entertainment, giving the spectator an immediate and quick adrenaline rush; once the “emotional masturbation” is over, once our little tear has been shed, once we’ve commented and shared, we feel better. We close the browser, and go on with our lives.
If the tabloid genre of grief porn, Conaboy stresses out, is as old as sexual scandals, until now it was only limited to particularly tragic, violent, extraordinary death accounts; the internet, on the other hand, makes it possible to expose common people’s private lives. These videos could be part of a widespread exhibitionism/vouyeurism dynamics, in which the will to show off one’s pain is matched by the users’ desire to watch it — and to press the “Like” button in order to prove their sensitivity.

During the Twentieth Century we witnessed a collective removal of death. So much has been written about this removal process, there is no need to dwell on it. The real question is: is something changing? What do these new phenomenons tell us about our own relationship with death? How is it evolving?

Skull-in-Fashion1

If death as a real, first-hand experience still remains a sorrowful mystery, a forbidden territory encompassing both the reality of the dead body (the true “scandal”) and the elaboration of grief (not so strictly coded as it once was), on the other hand we are witnessing an unprecedented pervasiveness of the representation of death.
Beyond the issues of commercialization and banalization, we have to face an ever more unhibited presence of death images in today’s society: from skulls decorating bags, pins, Tshirts as well as showing up in modern art Museums, to death becoming a communication/marketing/propaganda tool (terrorist beheadings, drug cartels execution videos, immense websites archiving raw footage of accidents, homicides and suicides). All of this is not death, it must be stressed, it’s just its image, its simulacrum — which doesn’t even require a narrative.
Referring to it as “death pornography” does make sense, given that these representations rely on what is in fact the most exciting element of classic pornography: it is what Baudrillard called hyper-reality, an image so realistic that it surpasses, or takes over, reality. (In porn videos, think of viewpoints which would be “impossibile” during the actual intercourse, think of HD resolution bringing out every detail of the actors’ skin, of 3D porn, etc. — this is also what happens with death in simulacrum.)

Damien Hirst poses with his famous For the love of God.

We can now die a million times, on the tip of a cursor, with every click starting a video or loading a picture. This omnipresence of representations of death, on the other hand, might not be a sign of an obscenity-bound, degenerated society, but rather a natural reaction and metabolization of last century’s removal. The mystery of death still untouched, its obscenity is coming apart (the obscene being brought back “on scene”) until it becomes an everyday image. To continue the parallelism with pornography, director Davide Ferrario (in his investigative book Guardami. Storie dal porno) wrote that witnessing a sexual intercourse, as a guest on an adult movie set, was not in the least exciting for him; but as soon as he looked into the camera viewfinder, everything changed and the scene became more real. Even some war photographers report that explosions do not seem real until they observe them through the camera lens. It is the dominion of the image taking over concrete objects, and if in Baudrillard’s writings this historic shift was described in somewhat apocalyptic colors, today we understand that this state of things — the imaginary overcoming reality — might not be the end of our society, but rather a new beginning.

Little by little our society is heading towards a global and globalized mythology. Intelligence — at least the classic idea of a “genius”, an individual achieving extraordinary deeds on his own — is becoming an outdated myth, giving way to the super-conscience of the web-organism, able to work more and more effectively than the single individual. There will be less and less monuments to epic characters, if this tendency proves durable, less and less heroes. More and more innovations and discoveries will be ascribable to virtual communities (but is there a virtuality opposing reality any more?), and the merit of great achievements will be distributed among a net of individuals.

In much the same way, death is changing in weight and significance.
Preservation and devotion to human remains, although both well-established traditions, are already being challenged by a new and widespread recycling sensitivity, and the idea of ecological reuse basically means taking back decomposition — abhorred for centuries by Western societies, and denied through the use of caskets preventing the body from touching the dirt. The Resurrection of the flesh, the main theological motivation behind an “intact” burial, is giving way to the idea of composting, which is a noble concept in its own right. Within this new perspective, respect for the bodies is not exclusively expressed through devotion, fear towards the bones or the inviolability of the corpse; it gives importance to the body’s usefulness, whether through organ transplant, donation to science, or reduction of its pollution impact. Destroying the body is no longer considered a taboo, but rather an act of generosity towards the environment.

At the same time, this new approach to death is slowly getting rid of the old mysterious, serious and dark overtones. Macabre fashion, black tourism or the many death-related entertainment and cultural events, trying to raise awareness about these topics (for example the London Month of the Dead, or the seminal Death Salon), are ways of dealing once and for all with the removal. Even humor and kitsch, as offensive as they might seem, are necessary steps in this transformation.

Human ashes pressed into a vinyl.

Human ashes turned into a diamond.

And so the internet is daily suggesting a kind of death which is no longer censored or denied, but openly faced, up to the point of turning it into a show.
In respect to the dizzying success of images of suffering and death, the word voyeurism is often used. But can we call it voyeurism when the stranger’s gaze is desired and requested by the “victims” themselves, for instance by terminally ill people trying to raise awareness about their condition, to leave a testimony or simply to give a voice to their pain?

Jennifer Johnson, madre di due bambini e malata terminale, nell'ultimo video prima della morte.

Jennifer Johnson, mother of two children, in her last video before she died (2012).

The exhibition of difficult personal experiences is a part of our society’s new expedient to deal with death and suffering: these are no longer taboos to be hidden and elaborated in the private sphere, but feelings worth sharing with the entire world. If at the time of big extended families, in the first decades of ‘900, grief was “spread” over the whole community, and in the second half of the century it fell back on the individual, who was lacking the instruments to elaborate it, now online community is offering a new way of allocation of suffering. Condoleances and affectionate messages can be received by perfect strangers, in a new paradigm of “superficial” but industrious solidarity.
Chris Picco, “daddy Blackbird”, certainly does not complain about the attention the video brought to him, because the users generosity made it possible for him to raise the $ 200.000 needed to cover medical expenses.

I could never articulate how much your support and your strength and your prayers and your emails and your Facebook messages and your text messages—I don’t know how any of you got my number, but there’s been a lot of me just, ‘Uh, okay, thank you, um.’ I didn’t bother going into the whole, ‘I don’t know who you are, but thank you.’ I just—it has meant so much to me, and so when I say ‘thank you’ I know exactly what you mean.

On the other end of the PC screen is the secret curiosity of those who watch images of death. Those who share these videos, more or less openly enjoying them. Is it really just “emotional masturbation”? Is this some obscene and morbid curiosity?
I personally don’t think there is such a thing as a morbid — that is, pathological — curiosity. Curiosity is an evolutionary tool which enables us to elaborate strategies for the future, and therefore it is always sane and healthy. If we examine voyeurism under this light, it turns out to be a real resource. When cars slow down at the sight of an accident, it’s not always in hope of seeing blood and guts: our brain is urging us to slow down because it needs time to investigate the situation, to elaborate what has happened, to understand what went on there. That’s exactly what the brain is wired to do — inferring data which might prove useful in the future, should we find ourselves in a similar situation.road-accidents

Accordingly, the history of theater, literature and cinema is full to the brim with tragedy, violence, disasters: the interest lies in finding out how the characters will react to the difficulties they come about. We still need the Hero’s Journey, we still need to discover how he’s going to overcome the tests he finds along the way, and to see how he will solve his problems. As kids, we carefully studied our parents to learn the appropriate response to every situation, and as adults our mind keeps amassing as much detail as possible, to try and control future obstacles.

By identifying with the father playing a sweet song to his dying son, we are confronting ourselves. “What is this man feeling? What would I do in such a predicament? Would I be able to overcome terror in this same way? Would this strategy work for me?”
The construction of our online persona comes only at a later time, when the video is over. Then it becomes important to prove to our contacts and followers that we are humane and sympathetic, that we were deeply moved, and so begins the second phase, with all the expressions of grief, the (real or fake) tears, the participation. This new paradigma, this modern kind of mourning, requires little time and resources, but it could work better than we think (again, see the success of Mr. Picco’s fund-raising campaing). And this sharing of grief is only possible on the account of the initial curiosity that made us click on that video.

And what about those people who dig even deeper into the dark side of the web, with its endless supply of images of death, and watch extremly gruesome videos?
The fundamental stimulus behind watching a video of a man who gets, let’s say, eaten alive by a crocodile, is probably the very same. At a basic lavel, we are always trying to acquire useful data to respond to the unknown, and curiosity is our weapon of defense and adaptation against an uncertain future; a future in which, almost certainly, we won’t have to fight off an alligator, but we’ll certainly need to face suffering, death and the unexpected.
The most shocking videos sometimes lure us with the promise of showing what is normally forbidden or censored: how does the human body react to a fall from a ten story building? Watching the video, it’s as if we too are falling by proxy; just like, by proxy but in a more acceptable context, we can indentify with the tragic reaction of a father watching his child die.

A weightlifter is lifting a barbell. Suddenly his knee snaps and collapses. We scream, jump off the seat, feel a stab of pain. We divert our eyes, then look again, and each time we go over the scene in our mind it’s like we are feeling a little bit of the athlete’s pain (a famous neurologic study on empathy proved that, in part, this is exactly what is going on). This is not masochism, nor a strange need to be upset: anticipation of pain is considered one of the common psychological strategies to prepare for it, and watching a video is a cheap and harmless solution.

In my opinion, the curiosity of those who watch images of suffering and death should not be stigmatized as “sick”, as it is a completely natural instinct. And this very curiosity is behind the ever growing offer of such images, as it is also what allows suffering people to stage their own condition.

The real innovations of these last few years have been the legitimization of death as a public representation, and the collectivization of the experience of grief and mourning — according to the spirit of open confrontation and sharing, typical of social media. These features will probably get more and more evident on Facebook, Twitter and similar platforms: even today, many people suffering from an illness are choosing to post real-time updates on their therapy, in fact opening the curtain over a reality (disease and hospital care) which has been concealed for a long time.

There’ll be the breaking of the ancient Western Code / Your private life will suddenly explode, sang Leonard Cohen in The Future. The great poet’s views expressed in the song are pessimistic, if not apocalyptc, as you would expect from a Twentieth century exponent. Yet it looks like this voluntary (and partial) sacrifice of the private sphere is proving to be an effective way to fix the general lack of grief elaboration codes. We talk ever more frequently about death and disease, and until now it seems that the benefits of this dialogue are exceeding the possible stress from over-exposure (see this article).

What prompted me to write this post is the feeling, albeit vague and uncertain, that a transition is taking place, before our eyes, even if it’s still all too cloudy to be clearly outlined; and of course, such a transformation cannot be immune to excesses, which inevitably affect any crisis. We shall see if these unprecedented, still partly unconscious strategies prove to be an adequate solution in dealing with our ultimate fate, or if they are bound to take other, different forms.
But something is definitely changing.

Video Bizzarro Death Match – I

Commentando un post di qualche settimana fa, il nostro lettore Alex ci aveva consigliato alcuni video musicali particolarmente weird. Poi, in una serie di mail private, ha rincarato la dose proponendo una selezione dei peggiori videoclip presenti sulla rete.

Potevamo forse rinunciare a questo succulento invito ad una “singolar tenzone” da combattersi a colpi di video trash?

Datevi malati al lavoro, chiudete le finestre, staccate il telefono! Si dia fiato alle trombe, rullino i tamburi… Sta per iniziare il primo Video Bizzarro Death Match!

Il tema, come abbiamo detto, è “VIDEO MUSICALI”. Ed ecco che il primo ad attaccare è Alex, che colpisce subito duro con un video dell’esuberante artista spagnolo Josmar:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4jTUnOSgrc]

Bizzarro Bazar accusa un po’ il colpo, ma subito risponde con un affondo micidiale: la temibile Lisa Gail, con la sua ballata pop 3 Second Rule.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57Sb14dyaUc]

Alex è quasi sopraffatto ma, dando prova di temerarietà e spavalderia non comuni, contrattacca con le armi della danza, e sfodera un corpo di ballo (e soprattutto un coreografo) da cardiopalma.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kA5GkLM5C7M]

Al povero Bizzarro Bazar, conciato male, non resta che lanciare un affondo assassino, e invocare nientemeno che la Collera di Ramses!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qp9V2bpT1cI]

Lo scontro sta raggiungendo proporzioni titaniche: Alex, ormai allo stremo, ricorre alla sua arma segreta per irritare e sfiancare il nemico. Lancia così l’umanamente insopportabile canzone tradizionale russa capace di far esplodere la testa a chi la ascolta.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzgi-Evu7Fk]

Crolla Bizzarro Bazar, arranca, evidentemente gli manca l’aria. Ma con un ghigno satanico, a sorpresa, ecco che sfodera un’arma di distruzione di massa – la temibile Pardon Me di Maxine Swaby.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dbU2f90OAw]

A questo punto Alex si vede costretto a puntare nuovamente sulla Russia, e sull’etilico video-trip di Grozdanka, in cui perfino il rosso dei semafori si tramuta in vino.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtvUB9YQgSQ]

Bizzarro Bazar, ormai in ginocchio, piange come un bambino. Fra le lacrime, prova comunque a difendersi con l’oscena camminata da granchio di Svendorrian il Grande – leader dei Black Northern Reign (band composta da lui stesso e basta).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yWqGR6LQ8s]

Anche Alex è allo stremo. Come ultima risorsa, prima della capitolazione, decide di liberare tutta la follia del Giappone in un solo video.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9d47OjcdIgs]

È a questo punto che Bizzarro Bazar scopre la sua ultima carta: un vero e proprio ordigno-fine-di-mondo capace di annientare qualsiasi forma di vita sulla Terra… Jan Terri con la sua Losing You.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqvQUoxLFI]

I due concorrenti sono entrambi in fin di vita quando risuona il gong.

Ora sta a voi scegliere chi dei due è il vincitore del match!

[polldaddy poll=6398440]

La sfida della cannella

Sappiamo tutti come la rete favorisca talvolta il propagarsi virale di mode, tendenze e dei cosiddetti memi; se la maggior parte dei memi è innocuo e umoristico, alcuni di questi comportamenti possono essere piuttosto pericolosi, e la famigerata cinnamon challenge (sfida della cannella) ne è un buon esempio.

Diffusasi di recente, la sfida consiste in questo: si riempie un cucchiaio da tavola di cannella in polvere, e si cerca di inghiottirla. Ovviamente il tutto mentre un amico filma l’impresa, immortalandola per il popolo di YouTube. Cosa c’è di tanto pericoloso, direte? In fondo la cannella non è tossica.

La polvere di cannella non è altro che corteccia finemente macinata. Questa mistura è composta in prevalenza di cellulosa idrorepellente, e anche i restanti composti organici non sono particolarmente idrosolubili. L’aldeide cinnamica, ad esempio, che è la sostanza che dà alla cannella il gusto e il profumo, si scioglie nell’alcol ma molto poco in acqua. Un esperimento che può chiarire quanto poco la cannella ami l’acqua è contenuto in questo video:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EetH4igTK4c]

Questo significa, in poche parole, che una grossa quantità di polvere di cannella non può proprio essere deglutita. La saliva, che serve da lubrificante, non può scioglierla, e la polvere si attacca a tutte le pareti della bocca, del palato, della lingua… fino in gola, se cercate di inghiottirla. A questo punto, se provate a respirare, la finissima polvere verrà aspirata nei polmoni. E qui sta la parte davvero pericolosa; non solo un possibile soffocamento, cioè, ma anche il serio rischio di polmonite.

Eccovi una selezione delle centinaia di video che si possono trovare su YouTube:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNQEcTGkAgM]

Fra tutte le varie “bravate” che si sono diffuse fra i ragazzi negli ultimi anni attraverso internet, la sfida della cannella è forse una delle più sciocche: primo, perché è truccata, e non può essere vinta; in secondo luogo, i danni provocati all’apparato respiratorio possono risultare permanenti. E se un amico si diverte tanto a vedervi soffocare, come accade nel video seguente, forse è ora di imparare a scegliere meglio le proprie compagnie.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pcO_8axg3Fs]

Oddities

Discovery Channel ha da poco lanciato un nuovo programma che sembra pensato apposta per gli appassionati di collezionismo macabro e scientifico: la serie è intitolata Oddities (“Stranezze”), e racconta la strana e particolare vita quotidiana dei proprietari del famoso negozio newyorkese Obscura Antiques and Oddities, la versione americana del nostrano Nautilus, di cui abbiamo già parlato.

I due simpatici proprietari di questa spettacolare wunderkammer ci mostrano in ogni episodio come vengono a scoprire di giorno in giorno oggetti curiosi, strabilianti o rari, regalandoci anche un’inaspettata galleria di personaggi che frequentano il negozio. Collezionisti seri e compunti che arrivano con la fida ventiquattrore dopo un importante meeting, gente semplice dai gusti particolari, giovani darkettoni appesantiti da centinaia di piercing, compositori musicali del calibro di Danny Elfman, bizzarri personaggi che collezionano articoli funerari e si emozionano per un tavolo da imbalsamazione, ragazzi normali che hanno scoperto nel solaio del nonno una testa di manzo siamese imbalsamata, o una bara ottocentesca, e cercano di ricavarci qualche soldo.

Mike Zohn ed Evan Michelson, i due proprietari di Obscura, passano il loro tempo fra mercati delle pulci e aste di antiquariato, cercando tutto ciò che è inusuale e bizzarro. Nella loro carriera di collezionisti hanno accumulato alcuni fra i pezzi più incredibili.

Purtroppo in Italia questa serie non è ancora arrivata, ed essendo un prodotto di nicchia è probabile che non la vedremo mai sui nostri teleschermi. Per consolarvi, ecco alcuni estratti da YouTube.

Mike ed Evan riescono ad annusare un’autentica mano di mummia egizia, che stando alla loro descrizione esala un “inebriante” odore di resina:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFepPtBkhpo]

“Oggigiorno è sempre più difficile trovare una testa mummificata”:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMTg0ZUFZ1I&NR=1]

Un’addetta delle pompe funebri (leggermente disturbata, a quanto sembra) ha una collezione invidiabile di strumenti di imbalsamazione e non sta più nella pelle quando Evan le propone l’acquisto di un tavolo utilizzato per presentare il cadavere nella camera ardente… dopotutto, si intona con gli strumenti antichi che lei ha già… come resistere?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-EoRA25NDA]

Un avventore scopre che quello che ha in mano è l’osso del pene di un tricheco. La maggior parte dei mammiferi (uomo escluso) è dotato di un simile osso. Sarà disposto a sborsare 450 $  per questo articolo?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2XBALa0ehQ]

Un ragazzo ha acquistato al mercato delle pulci una scatola piena di escrementi fossilizzati che gli hanno assicurato essere di dinosauro. Coproliti è il termine scientifico. Purtroppo, Mike gli spiega che quelli sono probabilmente escrementi di mammifero. Le deiezioni di uccelli e rettili sono molto più acquose. Pensate se doveste togliere una cosa del genere dal vostro parabrezza?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbcvEOwxQYU]