Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 15

  • Cogito, ergo… memento mori“: this Descartes plaster bust incorporates a skull and detachable skull cap. It’s part of the collection of anatomical plasters of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and it was sculpted in 1913 by Paul Richer, professor of artistic anatomy born in Chartres. The real skull of Descartes has a rather peculiar story, which I wrote about years ago in this post (Italian only).
  • A jarring account of a condition which you probably haven’t heard of: aphantasia is the inability of imagining and visualizing objects, situations, persons or feelings with the “mind’s eye”. The article is in Italian, but there’s also an English Wiki page.
  • 15th Century: reliquaries containing the Holy Virgin’s milk are quite common. But Saint Bernardino is not buying it, and goes into a enjoyable tirade:
    Was the Virgin Mary a dairy cow, that she left behind her milk just like beasts let themselves get milked? I myself hold this opinion, that she had no more and no less milk than what fitted inside that blessed Jesus Christ’s little mouth.

  • In 1973 three women and five men feigned hallucinations to find out if psychiatrists would realize that they were actually mentally healthy. The result: they were admitted in 12 different hospitals. This is how the pioneering Rosenhan experiment shook the foundations of psychiatric practice.
  • Can’t find a present for your grandma? Ronit Baranga‘s tea sets may well be the perfect gift.

  • David Nebreda, born in 1952, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 19. Instead of going on medication, he retired as a hermit in a two-room apartment, without much contact with the outside world, practicing sexual abstinence and fasting for long periods of time. His only weapon to fight his demons is a camera: his self-portraits undoubtedly represent some kind of mental hell — but also a slash of light at the end of this abyss; they almost look like they capture an unfolding catharsis, and despite their extreme and disturbing nature, they seem to celebrate a true victory over the flesh. Nebreda takes his own pain back, and trascends it through art. You can see some of his photographs here and here.
  • The femme fatale, dressed in glamourous clothes and diabolically lethal, is a literary and cinematographic myth: in reality, female killers succeed in becoming invisible exactly by playing on cultural assumptions and keeping a low and sober profile.
  • Speaking of the female figure in the collective unconscious, there is a sci-fi cliché which is rarely addressed: women in test tubes. Does the obsessive recurrence of this image point to the objectification of the feminine, to a certain fetishism, to an unconscious male desire to constrict, seclude and dominate women? That’s a reasonable suspicion when you browse the hundred-something examples harvested on Sci-Fi Women in Tubes. (Thanks, Mauro!)

  • I have always maintained that fungi and molds are superior beings. For instance the slimy organisms in the pictures above, called Stemonitis fusca, almost seem to defy gravity. My first article for the magazine Illustrati, years ago, was  dedicated to the incredible Cordyceps unilateralis, a parasite which is able to control the mind and body of its host. And I have recently stumbled upon a photograph that shows what happens when a Cordyceps implants itself within the body of a tarantula. Never mind Cthulhu! Mushrooms, folks! Mushrooms are the real Lords of the Universe! Plus, they taste good on a pizza!

  • The latest entry in the list of candidates for my Museum of Failure is Adelir Antônio de Carli from Brazil, also known as Padre Baloeiro (“balloon priest”). Carli wished to raise funds to build a chapel for truckers in Paranaguá; so, as a publicity stunt, on April 20, 2008, he tied a chair to 1000 helium-filled balloons and took off before journalists and a curious crowd. After reaching an altitude of 6,000 metres (19,700 ft), he disappeared in the clouds.
    A month and a half passed before the lower part of his body was found some 100 km off the coast.

  • La passionata is a French song covered by Guy Marchand which enjoyed great success in 1966. And it proves two surprising truths: 1- Latin summer hits were already a thing; 2- they caused personality disorders, as they still do today. (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • Two neuroscientists build some sort of helmet which excites the temporal lobes of the person wearing it, with the intent of studying the effects of a light magnetic stimulation on creativity.  And test subjects start seeing angels, dead relatives, and talking to God. Is this a discovery that will explain mystical exstasy, paranormal experiences, the very meaning of the sacred? Will this allow communication with an invisible reality? Neither of the two, because the truth is a bit disappointing: in all attempts to replicate the experiment, no peculiar effects were detected. But it’s still a good idea for a novel. Here’s the God helmet Wiki page.
  • California Institute of Abnormalarts is a North Hollywood sideshow-themed nightclub featuring burlesque shows, underground musical groups, freak shows and film screenings. But if you’re afraid of clowns, you might want to steer clear of the place: one if its most famous attractions is the embalmed body of Achile Chatouilleu, a clown who asked to be buried in his stage costume and makeup.
    Sure enough, he seems a bit too well-preserved for a man who allegedly died in 1912 (wouldn’t it happen to be a sideshow gaff?). Anyways, the effect is quite unsettling and grotesque…

  • I shall leave you with a picture entitled The Crossing, taken by nature photographer Ryan Peruniak. All of his works are amazing, as you can see if you head out to his official website, but I find this photograph strikingly poetic.
    Here is his recollection of that moment:
    Early April in the Rocky Mountains, the majestic peaks are still snow-covered while the lower elevations, including the lakes and rivers have melted out. I was walking along the riverbank when I saw a dark form lying on the bottom of the river. My first thought was a deer had fallen through the ice so I wandered over to investigate…and that’s when I saw the long tail. It took me a few moments to comprehend what I was looking at…a full grown cougar lying peacefully on the riverbed, the victim of thin ice.

Il cranio di Cartesio

Descartes3

Réné Descartes è riconosciuto come uno dei massimi filosofi mai esistiti, il cui pensiero si propose come spartiacque, gettando le basi per il razionalismo occidentale e facendo tabula rasa della logica tradizionale precedente; secondo Hegel, tutta la filosofia moderna nasce con lui: “qui possiamo dire d’essere a casa e, come il marinaio dopo un lungo errare, possiamo infine gridare “Terra!”. Cartesius segna un nuovo inizio in tutti i campi. Il pensare, il filosofare, il pensiero e la cultura moderna della ragione cominciano con lui.

Il filosofo francese pose il dubbio come base di qualsiasi ricerca onesta della verità. Epistemologo scettico nei confronti dei sensi ingannevoli, perfino della matematica, della materialità del corpo o di quelle realtà che ci sembrano più assodate, Cartesio si chiese: di cosa possiamo veramente essere sicuri, in questo mondo? Ecco allora che arrivò al primo, essenziale risultato, il vero e proprio “mattone” per porre le fondamenta del pensiero: se dubito della realtà, l’unica cosa certa è che io esisto, vale a dire che c’è almeno qualcosa che dubita. Il mio corpo potrà anche essere un’illusione, ma l’intuito mi dice che quella “cosa che pensa” (res cogitans) c’è davvero, altrimenti non esisterebbe nemmeno il pensiero. Questo concetto, espresso nella celebre formula cogito ergo sum, dà l’avvio alla sua ricognizione della realtà del mondo.

Frans_Hals_-_Portret_van_René_Descartes

I ritratti di Cartesio giunti fino a noi mostrano tutti lo stesso volto, fra il solenne e il beffardo, dallo sguardo penetrante e sicuro: dietro quegli occhi, si potrebbe dire, riposa il fondamento stesso del pensiero, della scienza, della cultura moderna. Ma la sorte beffarda volle che il cranio di Cartesio, lo scrigno che aveva contenuto le idee di quest’uomo straordinario, l’involucro di quel cogito che dà certezza all’esistenza, conoscesse un lungo periodo di vicissitudini.

Nel 1649 Cartesio, già celebre, accettò l’invito di Cristina di Svezia e si trasferì a Stoccolma per farle da precettore: la regina, infatti, desiderava studiare la filosofia cartesiana direttamente alla fonte, dall’autore stesso. Ma gli orari delle lezioni, fissate in prima mattinata, costrinsero Cartesio ad esporsi al rigido clima svedese e, a meno di un anno dal suo arrivo a Stoccolma, Cartesio si ammalò di polmonite e morì.

Il suo corpo venne inumato in un cimitero protestante alla periferia della capitale. Nel 1666, la salma fu riesumata per essere riconsegnata alla cattolica Francia, che ne rivendicava il possesso. Le spoglie, arrivate a Parigi, vennero sepolte nella chiesa di Sainte-Geneviève per poi essere ulteriormente traslate nel Museo dei monumenti funebri francesi. Lì rimasero per tutto il tumultuoso periodo della Rivoluzione. Allo smantellamento della collezione, nel 1819, i resti di Cartesio vennero portati nella loro sede definitiva, nella chiesa di Saint-Germain-des-Prés, dove riposano tuttora. Ma c’era un problema.

Cartesio

Durante la terza riesumazione, di fronte ai luminari dell’Accademia delle Scienze, si aprì la bara e le ossa dello scheletro tornarono alla luce: ci si accorse subito, però, che qualcosa non andava. Il teschio di Cartesio mancava all’appello. Da chi e quando era stato sottratto?

Una volta annunciato lo scandalo del furto, cominciarono a spuntare in tutta Europa teschi o frammenti di cranio attribuiti al grande filosofo.

La quantità di reperti scatenò feroci controversie: come potevano esistere più teschi, e così tanti frammenti, di una stessa persona? Ironia del destino: il dubbio, che era stato alla base del Discorso su metodo di Descartes, veniva a intaccare i suoi stessi resti mortali.

(A. Zanchetta, Frenologia della vanitas, 2011)

Si venne a scoprire che già all’epoca della prima esumazione, nel 1666, il teschio era stato probabilmente sostituito con un altro; ma nel 1819 si era volatilizzato perfino il cranio posticcio. Oltre ai due teschi, fu possibile verificare che anche altre ossa erano state sottratte, per essere tramandate per oltre tre secoli in chissà quali ambiti privati.

E il teschio originale? Sarebbe rimasto per sempre ad adornare la sconosciuta scrivania di qualche facoltoso dilettante filosofo?
Dopo essere passato per decenni fra le mani di professori, mercanti, militari, vescovi e funzionari governativi, il cranio di Cartesio riemerse infine in un’asta pubblica in Svezia, dove venne acquistato e rispedito in dono alla Francia.

descartes-crane

Era piccolo, liscio, sorprendentemente leggero. Il colore non era uniforme: in alcuni punti era stato sfregato fino a uno splendore perlaceo mentre in altri punti c’era una spessa patina di sporco, ma perlopiù aveva l’aspetto di una vecchia pergamena. E in effetti si trattava di un oggetto che aveva molte storie da raccontare, in senso non solo figurato ma anche letterale. Più di due secoli fa qualcuno gli aveva scritto sulla calotta una pomposa poesia in latino, le cui lettere sbiadite erano ora di un marrone annerito. Un’altra iscrizione, proprio sulla fronte, accennava oscuramente – e in svedese – a un furto. Sui lati si vedevano vagamente i fitti scarabocchi delle firme di tre degli uomini che l’avevano posseduto.

(R. Shorto, Le ossa di Cartesio, 2009)

3438106_3_e07e_le-crane-de-descartes-1596-1650_08dcdcbb4b545979cf36e193f0924190

19286788

Il teschio venne dato in consegna al Musée de l’Homme a Parigi, dove è conservato tutt’oggi.
Sulla sua fronte si può leggere l’iscrizione apposta dal responsabile della sottrazione originaria: “Il teschio di Descartes, preso da J. Fr. Planström, nell’anno 1666, all’epoca in cui il corpo stava per essere restituito alla Francia“.

Ancora oggi, paradossalmente, il cranio dell’iniziatore del pensiero razionale conserva tutto l’irrazionale fascino di una sacra reliquia.

descran