Little Lost People

What was the last time you actually paid attention to the sidewalk?
Can the microcosm around our feet still hold some unexpected visions?
Does it still mean something to focus on small things and details, and to look down – beside avoiding stepping on something unpleasant?

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In a world where we are taught that everything, from skyscrapers to our own ambitions, should aim high, artists Slinkachu and Cordal – each their own way, each of them with a different and personal approach – seem to want to value all that is small, forgotten, invisible.
The works of these two street artists, who are both active, independently from one another, on the London scene, could be confused at a first glance: they both utilize tiny figurines, and install their provocative miniature sculptures inside the urban context, leaving them to their fate. But the similarities really stop there.

Slinkachu has an unmistakable satirical and sardonic vein, so much so that his installations are presented as snarky micro-stories; Slinkachu mini-men are mirrors, spoofs debunking our miseries, excesses and vanities. How intelligent, how civilized they must think they are – yet dimensions contradict their actions. Whether they believe they are criminals or superheroes, these microscopic little primates aren’t going anywhere.

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Their misadventures are evidently similar to ours, and the figurines sometimes even represent a pop and bizarre version of some of the most debated themes in the news.

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Cordal’s little men, on the other hand, are the nightmare of removal coming back to the surface.
The atmosphere here is apocalyptic, melancholic, surreal, and in his works the miniature cannot be separated from the (often hopeless) landscape in which it has been positioned.
There is something touching and strangely eerie in this anonymous people emerging from the puddles in our cities, or sinking back into them “following the leaders”; there is a Beckett quality to these sad ghosts haunting our drainpipes, to these lost tourists, to these victims of the cruelty of a much too large and heavy world, and to their tiny bodies disappearing in the surrounding filth.

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What haunts us, in these figurines, is the fact we recognize them all too well. We can identify, and yet we cannot shake the embarassement of a vague guilt. The world is, after all, custom-made to be our size, not theirs.
The poor, the troubled, the outsiders inhabit realities that are too small, they live on a scale which is too distant for us to realize that we are stepping on them. Still, it would suffice to watch.

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Here are the official sites for Slinkachu, and for Isaac Cordal.

Dame di porcellana

L’eclettica artista britannica Jessica Harrison ha da poco lanciato una collezione di bambole di porcellana davvero uniche. Attenzione, però: non sono le classiche damine di cui fa collezione vostra nonna. Questi delicati soprammobili dal gusto rétro e un po’ kitsch entrano grazie al lavoro della Harrison in una dimensione decisamente diversa, molto meno innocente.

Jessica Harrison ha infatti umoristicamente addobbato questi eleganti e innocui oggetti con un tocco inaspettato: gli eccessi gore e splatter del cinema horror più estremo! Ecco allora le sorridenti dame di corte esibire mutilazioni e ferite che non sembrano minare assolutamente il loro ottimismo e la loro signorilità. Anche decapitate o sbudellate, lo stile resta sempre stile: la leggiadria delle loro pose e delle allegre danze sopravvive intatta.

E dopotutto, forse… ma sì… perché non regalarne una a vostra nonna?

Il sito ufficiale di Jessica Harrison. Scoperto via BoingBoing.