Subversive farts & musical anuses

Those who have been reading me for some time know my love for unconventional stories, and my stubborn belief that if you dig deep enough into any topic, no matter how apparently inappropriate, it is possible to find some small enlightenments.
In this post we will attempt yet another tightrope walking exercise. Starting from a question that might sound ridiculous at first: can flatulence give us some insight about human nature?

An article appeared on the Petit Journal on May 1st 1894 described “a more or less lyrical artist whose melodies, songs without words, do not come exactly from the heart. To do him justice it must be said that he has pioneered something entirely his own, warbling from the depth of his pants those trills which others, their eyes towards heaven, beam at the ceiling“.
The sensational performer the Parisian newspaper was referring to was Joseph Pujol, famous by his stage name Le Pétomane.

Born in Marseille, and not yet thirty-seven at the time, Pujol had initially brought his act throughout the South of France, in Cette, Béziers, Nîmes, Toulouse and Bordeaux, before eventually landing in Paris, where he performed for several years at the Moulin Rouge.
His very popular show was entirely based on his extraordinary abilities in passing wind: he was able to mimic the sound of different musical instruments, cannon shots, thunders; he could modulate several popular melodies, such as La Marseillese, Au clair de la lune, O sole mio; he could blow out candles with an air blast from 30 centimeters away; he could play flutes and ocarinas through a tube connected with his derriere, with which he was also able to smoke a cigarette.
Enjoying an ever-increasing success between XIX and XX Century, he even performed before the Prince of Whales, and Freud himself attended one of his shows (although he seemed more interested in the audience reactions rather than the act itself).

Pujol had discovered his peculiar talent by chance at the age of thirteen, when he was swimming in the sea of his French Riviera. After sensing a piercing cold in his intestine, he hurried back to the shore and, inside a bathing-hut, he discovered that his anus had, for some reason, taken in a good amount of sea water. Experimenting throughout the following years, Pujol trained himself to suck air into his bottom; he could not hold it for very long, but this bizarre gift guaranteed him a certain notoriety among his peers at first, and later among his fellow soldiers when he joined the army.
Once he had reached stage fame, and was already a celebrated artist, Pujol was examined by several doctors who were interested in studying his anatomy and physiology. Medicine papers are a kind of literature I very much enjoy reading, but few are as delectable as the article penned by Dr. Marcel Badouin and published in 1892 on the Semaine médicale with the title Un cas extraordinaire d’aspiration rectale et d’anus musical (“An extraordinary case of rectal aspiration and musical anus”). If you get by in French, you can read it here.
Among other curiosities, in the article we discover that one of Pujol’s abilities (never included in his acts on grounds of decency) was to sit in a washbowl, sucking in the water and spraying it in a strong gush up to a five-meter distance.

The end of Joseph Pujol’s carreer coincided with the beginning of the First World War. Aware of the unprecedented inhumanity of the conflict, Pujol decided that his ridiculous and slightly shameful art was no longer suitable in front of such a cruel moment, and he retired for good to be a baker, his father’s job, until his death in 1945.
For a long time his figure was removed, as if he was an embarassement for the bougeoisie and those French intellectuals who just a few years earlier were laughing at this strange ham actor’s number. He came back to the spotlight only in the second half of XX Century, namely because of a biography published by Pauvert and of the movie Il Petomane (1983) directed by Pasquale Festa Campanile, in which the title character is played by Italian comedian Ugo Tognazzi with his trademark bittersweet acting style (the film on the other hand was never released in France).

Actually Pujol was not the first nor the last “pétomane”. Among his forerunners there was Roland the Farter, who lived in XII-Century England and who earned 30 acres of land and a huge manorfor his services as a buffoon under King Henry II. By contract he went on to perform before the sovereign, at Christmas, “unum saltum et siffletum et unum bumbulum” (one jump, one whistle and one fart).
But the earliest professional farter we know about must be a medieval jester called Braigetóir, active in Ireland and depicted in the most famous plate of John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande, with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581).

The only one attempting to repeat Pujol’s exploits in modern times is British performer Paul Oldfield, known as Mr. Methane, who besides appearing on Britain’s Got Talent also recorded an album and launched his own Android app. If you look for some of his videos on YouTube, you will notice how times have unfortunately changed since the distinguished elegance shown by Pujol in the only remaining silent film of his act.


Let’s get back now to our initial question. What does the story of Joseph Pujol, and professional farters in general, tell us? What is the reason of their success? Why does a fart make us laugh?

Flatulence, as all others bodily expressions associated with disgust, is a cultural taboo. This means that the associated prohibition is variable in time and latitude, it is acquired and not “natural”: it is not innate, but rather something we are taught since a very early age (and we all know what kind of filthy behavior kids are capable of).
Anthropologists link this horror for bodily fluids and emissions to the fear of our animal, pre-civilized heritage; the fear that we might become primitive again, the fear of seeing our middle-class ideal of dignity and cleanliness crumble under the pressure of a remainder of bestiality. It is the same reason for which societies progressively ban cruelty, believed to be an “inhuman” trait.

The interesting fact is that the birth of this family of taboos can be historically, albeit conventionally, traced: the process of civilization (and thus the erection of this social barrier or fronteer) is usually dated back to the XVI and XVII Centuries — which not by chance saw the growing popularity of Della Casa’s etiquette treatise Il Galateo.
In this period, right at the end of the Middle Ages, Western culture begins to establish behavioral rules to limit and codify what is considered respectable.

But in time (as Freud asserted) the taboo is perceived as a burden and a constriction. Therefore a society can look for, or create, certain environments that make it acceptable for a brief period to bend the rules, and escape the discipline. This very mechanism was behind the balsphemous inversions taking place in Carnival times, which were accepted only because strictly limited to a specific time of the year.

In much the same way, Pujol’s fart shows were liberating experiences, only possible on a theatrical stage, in the satyrical context of cabaret. By fracturing the idealistic facade of the gentleman for an hour or so, and counterposing the image of the physiological man, the obscenity of the flesh and its embarassements, Pujol on a first level seemed to mock bourgeois conventions (as later did Buñuel in the infamous dinner scene from his 1974 film The Phantom of Liberty).
Had this been the case, had Pujol’s act been simply subversive, it would had been perceived as offensive and labeled as despicable; his success, on the other hand, seems to point in another direction.

It’s much more plausible that Pujol, with his contrived and refined manners conflicting with the grotesque intestinal noises, was posing as a sort of stock comic character, a marionette, a harmless jester: thanks to this distance, he could arguably enact a true cathartic ritual. The audience laughed at his lewd feats, but were also secretely able to laugh at themselves, at the indecent nature of their bodies. And maybe to accept a bit more their own repressed flaws.

Perhaps that’s the intuition this brief, improper excursus can give us: each time a fart in a movie or a gross toilet humor joke makes us chuckle, we are actually enacting both a defense and an exorcism against the reality we most struggle to accept: the fact that we still, and anyway, belong to the animal kingdom.

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – I

View on Paris

Qualche anno fa avevamo pubblicato due articoli-reportage su New York (li trovate qui e qui), dedicati a musei, negozi e luoghi insoliti della Grande Mela. Quest’anno, invece, il vostro fedele esploratore del perturbante si è diretto a Parigi, dove ha scovato per voi alcuni fra gli angoli meno battuti della capitale francese.

Già nel XVIII secolo Francesco Algarotti sentenziava “molti vanno a Parigi, ma pochi ci sono stati“, e forse questo è ancora più vero oggi che il turismo di massa detta le regole per visitare qualsiasi città, imponendo al viaggiatore tutta una serie di tappe obbligate da spuntare come caselline della tombola. Questa esperienza di superficie certamente rassicura il pellegrino di aver visto “tutte le cose più importanti”, ma rischia di farlo tornare a casa con l’immagine della città che già aveva prima di partire. E invece anche Parigi, come tutti i luoghi ricchi d’una storia antica e travagliata, nasconde un volto sconosciuto ai più.

Dimenticatevi quindi – o, meglio, date pure per assodati – i fasti di Versailles, le folle che risalgono la Torre Eiffel, gli assiepati scalini di Montmartre, il sorriso beffardo della Gioconda o lo shopping di lusso sui Champs-Elisées; e preparatevi per un viaggio alla scoperta dei meravigliosi gioielli che le luci della Ville Lumière hanno lasciato nella penombra.

ecole_veterinaire2

Come prima tappa partiamo dalla banlieue a sud-est di Parigi, a soli tre chilometri dalla capitale, visitando a Maisons-Alfort il Musée Fragonard, che si trova ospitato all’interno della Scuola Veterinaria. Qui un’immensa collezione di ossa e di scheletri animali si contende la scena con dei modelli in gesso degli organi interni, a grandezza naturale oppure in scala notevolmente maggiore, a fini di studio.

fragonard-1

fragonard-2

fragonard-3

fragonard-4

fragonard-5

fragonard-6

fragonard-7

fragonard-8

fragonard-9

fragonard-10

fragonard-11

fragonard-12

Le cose cominciano a farsi più impressionanti quando si raggiunge la sezione teratologica del museo, che espone le diverse malformazioni, mutazioni genetiche e mostruosità. Preparati a secco, mummificati, oppure in soluzione ci presentano la versione animale dei “gemelli siamesi”: agnelli craniopaghi e toracopaghi, maiali con sviluppi fetali parassitari e galline con arti in sovrannumero si alternano a feti ciclopi, vitelli idrocefali e capre nate senza testa (anencefalia).

fragonard-13

fragonard-14

fragonard-15

fragonard-16

fragonard-17

fragonard-18

fragonard-19

fragonard-20

fragonard-21

fragonard-22

fragonard-23

fragonard-24

Ma è nell’ultima stanza che sono contenuti i reperti più straordinari. Si tratta dei celebri écorchés di Fragonard, di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo: duecento anni prima di Gunther Von Hagens e del suo Body Worlds, e senza alcuna delle tecnologie ultramoderne disponibili oggi, l’anatomista francese era riuscito a preservare perfettamente alcuni cadaveri sezionati e fissati in modo da esporre l’anatomia interna a beneficio degli studenti.

fragonard-25

fragonard-26

fragonard-27

fragonard-28

In alcuni casi disposti in pose artistiche, come “l’uomo con la mandibola” o i “feti danzanti“, i preparati anatomici sono ancora perfetti, con le loro vernici lucide e brillanti e un’espressività per nulla diminuita dal passare dei secoli.

fragonard-31

fragonard-29

fragonard-30

fragonard-32

fragonard-33

fragonard-34

Difficile non rimanere a bocca aperta di fronte al più incredibile fra tutti i pezzi conservati qui: il “Cavaliere dell’Apocalisse“, montato su un vero e proprio cavallo, a sua volta sezionato.

fragonard-35

fragonard-36

fragonard-37

fragonard-38

fragonard-39

fragonard-40

Spostiamoci ora nel cuore della città.
Quartiere un tempo malfamato, divenuto iconico per i suoi spettacoli osé, per il Moulin Rouge, i bordelli, il Grand Guignol e i cafés a tema, Pigalle si è oggi adeguato ai tempi e alle esigenze turistiche, reinventandosi come paradiso dei locali di lap dance e dei negozi del sesso. Lungo il Boulevard de Clichy le vetrine propongono, senza censure o pudori, una costellazione di futuristici sex toys, coadiuvanti, afrodisiaci, ritardanti, arditi capi di lingerie affiancati al consueto armamentario BDSM fatto di cuoio, borchie, scudisci e ball gag.

Proprio al centro di questa esibizione del sesso fatto spettacolo e merchandising, si apre il Musée de l’Erotisme. Anche ad Amsterdam, nel Red Light District, ne esiste uno di simile, ma quello di Parigi si distingue dal suo omonimo olandese per almeno tre motivi: il primo è la ricchezza della sezione antropologica, che conta svariate decine di manufatti provenienti da diverse epoche e latitudini.

erotisme-1

erotisme-2

erotisme-3

erotisme-4

erotisme-5

erotisme-6

Dalle terrecotte etrusche ai feticci africani, dalle colorate statue balinesi agli avori cinesi, la collezione dimostra come il tema erotico sia stato affrontato senza particolari inibizioni da quasi tutte le culture tradizionali e spesso proprio nel contesto dell’arte sacra (come simbolo/auspicio/invocazione di fecondità e fertilità).

erotisme-7

erotisme-8

erotisme-9

erotisme-10

erotisme-11

Il secondo punto di interesse è la parte dedicata alla storia e al costume delle case chiuse dalla fine del I secolo al 1946, con fotografie d’epoca, documenti vari e perfino un bidet in porcellana originale (come è noto, questo accessorio da bagno si diffuse proprio nell’ambito della prostituzione).

erotisme-12

erotisme-13

erotisme-14

erotisme-15

erotisme-16

erotisme-17

Infine, ai livelli più alti (il museo si sviluppa su ben sette piani!) vengono ospitate mostre temporanee di artisti internazionali, le cui opere esposte sono in alcuni casi disponibili per l’acquisto.

erotisme-18

erotisme-19

erotisme-21

erotisme-23

erotisme-22

erotisme-20

Ben più dei sexy shop che lo circondano, il Museo rimanda un’immagine dell’eros che un po’ si è andata a perdere nel tempo: attraverso queste varie declinazioni artistiche, raffigurazioni antiche e contemporanee, il desiderio sessuale viene riportato alla sua originaria dimensione mitologica, archetipica e sacra.

erotisme-24

Dall’Eros passiamo a Thanatos, e addentriamoci nei labirinti sotterranei che si snodano sotto le case di Montparnasse.
Nonostante il loro nome ricordi quelle romane, le Catacombe di Parigi erano in realtà le antiche cave da cui veniva estratta la pietra per costruire la città: quando nel 1785 il Cimitero degli Innocenti nel quartiere delle Halles, che era stato in uso per quasi dieci secoli, venne evacuato a causa del pericolo d’infezione, si decise di spostare i resti nelle cave ormai abbandonate. Consacrate nel 1786 come ossario municipale, le Catacombe ospitarono fino al 1814 le salme traslate da tutti i cimiteri della capitale, mano a mano che questi venivano chiusi per insalubrità. Oggi si stima che vi siano raccolte le ossa di circa sei o sette milioni di parigini.

catacombes-1

catacombes-2

catacombes-3

catacombes-4

catacombes-5

catacombes-9

Fermati, qui sta l’impero della morte“, avverte un verso inciso all’entrata dell’ossario.
A venti metri sotto il suolo, sui lati degli stretti corridoi e delle gallerie oscure, sono disposte le une sulle altre migliaia e migliaia di ossa, a formare una scenografia macabra impressionante.

catacombes-10

catacombes-7

catacombes-11

catacombes-12

catacombes-13

catacombes-14

catacombes-15

Talvolta il muro di teschi e tibie si apre su camere più larghe, piccoli altari, croci o altri luoghi di raccoglimento. Lungo tutto il percorso (di ben due chilometri) sono disseminati poemi, aforismi, testi sacri e profani che esortano a meditare sulla propria mortalità.

catacombes-16

catacombes-17

catacombes-18

catacombes-19

catacombes-20

Questi morti accerchiano il visitatore, lo soverchiano in numero schiacciante – è davvero l’Impero della Morte, con le sue armate silenziose, che ci attende quaggiù: eppure, paradossalmente, non ci si può sentire dei veri e propri intrusi in questo mondo senza luce, perché il destino che attende tutti gli uomini accomuna l’ospite a questi resti anonimi. Fra le ossa vi sono, probabilmente, anche quelle di Rabelais, La Fontaine, Perrault, così come i ghigliottinati Danton e Robespierre, eppure nulla ormai li distingue dai loro coetanei. Mai come quaggiù l’égalité del motto nazionale francese assume una sfumatura beffarda e, al tempo stesso, stranamente rassicurante.

catacombes-23

catacombes-21

catacombes-26

catacombes-25

catacombes-27

MUSEE FRAGONARD
7, avenue Général-de-Gaulle
Maisons-Alfort
Apertura: mercoledì e giovedì, sabato e domenica
Orari: 14-18

MUSEE DE L’EROTISME
72 Boulevard de Clichy
Apertura: tutti i giorni
Orari: 10-02
Sito web

CATACOMBES DE PARIS
1, avenue du Colonel Henri Rol-Tanguy (place Denfert-Rochereau)
Apertura: da martedì a domenica
Orari: 10-20
Sito web

(Questo articolo è il primo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. Gli altri due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Grand Guignol

A vederlo da fuori, non faceva chissà quale impressione: era un teatrino posto alla fine di un vicolo cieco nel 9° arrondissement, e poteva contenere soltanto 300 persone: una miseria, rispetto agli altri teatri parigini. Eppure il Grand-Guignol registrava il tutto esaurito, ogni sera, ad ognuno dei suoi spettacoli distribuiti su diversi orari.

No, non c’erano affascinanti donnine nude in quegli spettacoli. Niente cabaret o gonne rialzate come al Moulin Rouge. Quello che il Grand-Guignol offriva era davvero unico: dalla data della sua apertura, nel 1897, il suo fondatore Oscar Métenier aveva deciso che il suo teatro avrebbe mostrato la faccia della realtà che il teatro borghese “alto” non avrebbe mai potuto rappresentare. Cominciò così ad adattare per il suo teatro quella “Mademoiselle Fifi” protagonista di un romanzo di Maupassant. Si trattava della prima prostituta protagonista su un palcoscenico. Risultato: il Guignol venne temporaneamente chiuso dalla polizia per motivi di censura. Nella seguente pièce “Lui!”, Métenier piazzava in una stanza d’hotel un’altra prostituta e un criminale.

A sostituire Métenier alla direzione del teatro arrivò quasi subito Max Maurey: fu lui che ebbe l’illuminazione – il Grand-Guignol si sarebbe trasformato in una casa dell’orrore! I suoi protagonisti sarebbero stati i derelitti – prostitute, uomini di malaffare, malviventi, trafficanti, assassini. Le storie che li vedevano protagonisti dovevano essere ancora più sordide: tradimenti, vendette, infanticidi, torture, accoltellamenti, decapitazioni, e tutto un armamentario di crudeltà assortite. Maurey decise che avrebbe misurato la riuscita di ogni spettacolo dal numero di svenimenti in sala…

Assunse così il drammaturgo André De Lorde, che scrisse e mise in scena centinaia di questi drammi nerissimi; sul palcoscenico, grazie all’uso di effetti speciali (talvolta raffazzonati, ma talvolta fin troppo convincenti), si poteva vedere una vecchia a cui veniva premuta la faccia sulla piastra ardente della cucina… una bella donna trafitta da una dozzina di coltelli… sgozzamenti fra mariti e mogli, regolamenti di conti fra luridi individui, cadaveri, urla, sangue finto e molto, molto sensazionalismo.

La formula era davvero magica. Per appagare questo segreto e inconfessabile piacere, i parigini riempivano la sala più volte a sera. Pian piano il tema centrale degli spettacoli del Grand-Guignol divenne la follia (che in quel periodo si iniziava appena a studiare), declinata in mille manie e perversioni diverse: c’era il necrofilo che disseppelliva i corpi, c’era la tata che provava l’impulso di strangolare i bambini che teneva in custodia, ecc. Allo stesso modo altre malattie fecero fortuna all’interno delle pièce: la rabbia sopra a tutte, ma anche la lebbra (faceva sempre effetto vedere gli attori che perdevano pezzi di corpo), o la vergognosa sifilide.

Nei suoi quasi 70 anni di attività, il Grand-Guignol ebbe anche la sua star: Paula Maxa.

Lungo la sua carriera al Grand-Guignol, Maxa, “la donna assassinata più volte al mondo”, subì una serie di torture senza pari nella storia del teatro: le spararono, con il fucile e con la pistola, le fecero lo scalpo. Fu strangolata, sventrata, stuprata, ghigliottinata, impiccata, squartata, bruciata, dissezionata, tagliata in 83 pezzi da una spada invisibile spagnola, morsa da uno scorpione, avvelenata con l’arsenico, divorata da un puma, strangolata con una collana di perle, e frustata.

Oltre a questo, fu soggetta ad una spettacolare mutazione che un critico teatrale dell’epoca descrisse così: “Per duecento notti di fila, lei semplicemente si decompose sul palcoscenico di fronte a una platea che non avrebbe scambiato il proprio posto con tutto l’oro delle Americhe. L’operazione durava due minuti buoni, durante i quali la giovane donna si trasformava a poco a poco in un cadavere orribile”.

Ma poi arrivò la Seconda Guerra Mondiale, che tolse l’innocenza a tutti e tutto. Se il pubblico aveva potuto essere spaventato in modo fanciullesco dagli orrori del Grand-Guignol, dopo il conflitto non fu più possibile. Nel 1962, dopo un’ultima stanca stagione, il teatro chiuse i battenti per sempre. Il suo ultimo direttore, Charles Nonon, spiegò le motivazioni della sua decisione: “Non avremmo mai potuto competere con Buchenwald. Prima della guerra, tutti credevano che quello che succedeva sul palcoscenico era puramente immaginario; ora sappiamo che queste cose sono possibili – anzi, che può esserci anche di peggio”.