The primitive seduction: two unusual “savages”

In 1929, New York’s Knopf publishing house issued the book Lobagola: An Africa Savage’s Own Story. This remarkable autobiography, written by Bata Kindai Amgoza ibn LoBagola, told the adventurous and bizarre life of a “stranger in the XX Century“.
Bata LoBagola was born in West Africa, in a region of Dahomey (now Benin) so remote that it had not been yet reached by white men. Bata had his first encounter with Europeans in the last years of XIX Century when, together with some other members of his tribe, he ventured to the coast and saw a ship getting ready to set sail. When they got to the ship in a canoe, the “savages” were welcomed aboard by merchants, who for an hour or so toured them across the boat; but when the ship left the bank without warning, Bata’s friends, scared, jumped in the water and were devoured by sharks. Bata, who had been delayed under the deck, escaped that fate but had to leave for a different continent’s unknown lands. He was only seven years old.

He landed in Scotland, where he spent his adolescence under the protection of a generous benefactor, and was educated in Edinburgh and Glasgow. Almost by chance, he found out he could earn a little money in the entertainment world, simply telling about his country of origin and his people. So he started to perform in vaudevilles and small traveling shows, answering the audience’s questions and performing traditional dances. Being well-learned, intelligent and an excellent speaker, he soon became more than a simple sideshow attraction, and began being invited to speak before ethnologists and anthropologists. Traveling back and forth between Europe and the United States, LoBagola lectured at the University of Pennsylvania and at Oxford, becoming some kind of “cultural ambassador” for West Africa and of his people’s uses and customs.

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To understand why audiences were so fascinated with this “savage”, we have to think about the mentality of that time. In the second half of XIX Century, intensifying colonialism had brought to the discovery of several primitive people, and simultaneously the new modern anthropology was born. On a popular level, adventure novels focusing on the exploration of virgin lands were among the most successful publications. And the insatiable desire for exotism mixed with a widespread and open racism, with the curiosity of seeing the backward primitive man with one’s own eyes; so much so that when he was invited to Philadelphia in 1911, LoBagola earned the definition of “best exhibit in the entire Museum“. As his promotional pamphlet put it, he really seemed “too refined for the primitive crudities of his tribe and too wild for sophisticated society“.

Bata Lobagola was by now a sort of celebrity, constantly touring as a cultural informant in schools and universities, but unfortunately his life took a turn for the worse. Bata had problems with alcohol and a tendency to be involved in small brawls, but the actual sword of Damocles hanging over his head was his homosexuality. Arrested several times for sodomy and minor misdemeanor, he ended up in prison for good in 1931 for petty theft and sexual crimes. The following year the Bureau of Naturalization, whose officials evidently thought something was wrong, began pressing LoBagola, eventually forcing him to confess a truth no one suspected until then.
Bata Kindai Amgoza ibn LoBagola’s real name was Joseph Howard Lee, and he was born in Baltimore, Maryland.

Not everything, in his book, was made up: Joseph Lee had probably been in Glasgow in his youth, as his pages show a certain knowledge of the town, and according to several accounts he had a slight scottish accent. But for sure his childhood had not been spent among lions and elephants — much as it was certain that lions and elephants did not “team up”, as he had written in a creative page of his book, to hunt down humans.
If some readers, who were familiar with West Africa, had realized by the time his false autobiography appeared that his descriptions were pure fantasy, University professors never started to doubt his version. All the most curious if we consider that in the same book the idea is candidly suggested that one could tell anything about Africa to white men, and they would believe it.
Racial discrimination can be considered one of the factors behind LoBagola’s false identity: since 1907, pretending to be a savage ensured him certain privileges that paradoxically he wouldn’t had been able to attain as an afroamerican. He died in 1947 in Attica maximum security prison, where the most dangerous criminals of the time were detained.

But his strange fraud had an excellent predecessor.

George Psalmanazar appeared in London in 1703, declaring to be native of Formosa (Taiwan), at the time a faraway island of which very little was known. Psalmanazar had astonishing habits: he only ate raw, cardamom-spiced meat, he slept sitting upright in a chair, performed complex every-day rituals to honor the Sun and Moon, and followed an unknown calendar. And his tales of his native land were fabulous and cruel — particularly his descriptions of the annual ritual sacrifices of 18.000 young boys, culminating in cannibalism.
George Psalmanazar was invited to talk about Formosan culture in the most important intellectual clubs, and even lectured before the Royal Society.
In 1704 he published An Historical and Geographical Description of Formosa, an Island subject to the Emperor of Japan, a book which immediately had enormous success and several reprints. Everywhere Formosa was the talk of the day: readers and intellectuals were fascinated by the accounts of these savages who only wore a golden plate to cover their genitals, who dwelled in underground homes feeding on snakes, and occasionally eating human flesh. Besides reporting on Formosa’s customs and traditions, Psalmanazar also detailed language and alphabet, so convincingly that many german grammars went on including this information even decades after the hoax had been confessed.

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In 1706, facing growing skepticism and the accounts of those travelers who had actually been to Formosa, Psalmanazar had to drop the mask: he actually was born in France, was educated by Jesuits, and his only talents were a huge knowledge and an uncommon attitude for languages. So much so that he succeded in constructing one from scratch, to support his lies and reach fame.
Before dying in 1763, he wrote a second book of memoirs, published posthumously, where he uncovered some details about the creation of his hoax. But not even in this last autobiography did he reveal his true name, which today still remains a mystery.

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In spite of his last years’ religious convertion and his remorse for the scam, Psalmanazar’s work is now regarded as a small masterpiece of ingenuity. Besides a functioning language, the author gave his fantastic island a history, cults and traditions, even several different coins and over precise ceremonial outfits, and today his fresco seems to anticipate, on the account of its obsessive care for detail, some modern literary constructions (think of Tolkien’s appendices about his imaginary Middle Earth’s genealogy, linguistics, botany, etc.).
But there’s more, as historian Benjamin Breen writes:

As I devoured the immense creativity on display in Description of Formosa, it occurred to me that Psalmanazar was also telling us something fundamental about the origins of modernity. The world of seafarers, merchants, slaves, and transported criminals that created Europe’s overseas empires was built upon elaborate fictions, from Prester John to Jonathan Swift. Although the scale and singularity of his deception made him unique, Psalmanazar was also representative: while he was inventing tales of Formosan cannibalism, his peers were writing falsified histories of pirate utopias, parodic accounts of islands populated by super-intelligent horses, and sincere descriptions of demonic sacrifices.
These works raised profound questions about the nature of truth and fiction. Is the act of travel also an act of authorship, of inventing a reality that we each filter through our individual preconceptions? How do we understand worlds that differ so fundamentally from our own that they almost seem to be other planets?

(B. Breen, Made in Taiwan?: An Eighteenth-Century Frenchman’s Fictional Formosa)

For LoBagola’s story, the main source is a wonderful podcast on Futility Closet. LoBagola’s autobiography can be found on Amazon. George Psalmanazar’s story is splendidly told in Banvard’s Folly, and Description of Formosa is available on the Internet Archive.

Roland Topor

 

Ogni giorno ripetersi: “Non sarò mai più così giovane come oggi”.
(Roland Topor)

Roland Topor (1938-1997) è stato un illustratore, disegnatore, pittore, scrittore, poeta, regista, paroliere, attore e cineasta francese.

Nato a Parigi da genitori polacchi, Topor si distingue come creatore narrativo per immagini dallo stile originale e trasgressivo – è curioso notare che la parola “topor” significa in polacco “ascia” – attivo nei campi più svariati dell’espressione figurativa nella quale infondeva carattere umoristico e dissacrante: dalla pittura all’illustrazione, dall’incisione alla fotografia, dalla scultura alla scenografia teatrale, dal cinema alla musica, dalla letteratura alla televisione.

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Nella sua opera, frutto di una vita indipendente da committenze continuative e da conformismi di ogni tipo, sempre a contatto umano ed artistico con personaggi del mondo dell’arte e della cultura internazionale, emergono affinità e richiami ad alcuni dei movimenti artistici del novecento quali l’esperienza Dada, la derivazione Cobra, il lavoro con Fluxus, le esperienze dei pittori gestuali, la trasgressione della Body-Art, l’ironia della Pop Art e, alle radici, la conoscenza della grande illustrazione didascalica dell’Ottocento: il tutto condito da umorismo nero e da amore per la libertà.

Topor non si occupa veramente dell’inconscio, ma dell’inaccettabile. La sua fantasia dissimula con crudezza la globalità strana del mondo. Nulla gli è estraneo ma il mondo intero è al di là del percettibile, perché quello che sembra più evidente , più banale – la morte, la sofferenza – in realtà non lo sono.” (Alberto e Gianmaria Giorgi)

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Artista poliedrico e spiazzante, Roland Topor è stato troppo frettolosamente dimenticato e accantonato dall’immaginario collettivo, sia a causa di una sua difficile catalogabilità, che per una sconcertante violenza insita nelle sue opere. Dotato di un’ironia beffarda e dissacrante, Topor ha sempre fatto venire i brividi lungo la schiena ai soloni della critica ufficiale.
Nella sua eccentrica carriera artistica ha fatto di tutto: dalla pittura all’illustrazione, dal teatro alla fotografia, dall’incisione alla scultura, dal cinema d’animazione ai romanzi, dalla musica alla televisione. E tutto questo continuamente sperimentando nuovi linguaggi espressivi e rimanendo fedele alle sue convinzioni e ai suoi principi. Erede del nichilismo dadaista, è riuscito con la sua enigmatica arte a demolire qualsiasi forma di autorità precostituita, ridimensionando contemporaneamente sia il borioso sapere scolastico che la cultura ufficiale imperante. Illuminante il fatto che abbia frequentato la rinomata Accademia di Belle Arti “dal bar di fronte”, come amava ricordare, rifiutando così di diventare un’artista/pollo di batteria come tanti altri.

Un individuo, per sopravvivere, deve dissimulare la sua virulenza.
Deve svolgere un’attività utile a una comunità umana, a un gruppo sociale.
Deve dare l’impressione di essere sincero. Deve apparire UOMO NORMALE.
La sola rivolta individuale consiste nel sopravvivere.

(Roland Topor)

La sua immaginazione sadica e il suo tagliente umorismo nero hanno disvelato, senza mezzi termini, l’assurdità nascosta nel reale, regalandoci un intimo e perturbante brivido. I suoi esseri umani immondi e mostruosi, raffigurati in preda ai piaceri più sfrenati e aggressivi, fanno pensare alle fantasie devianti di un moderno Hieronymous Bosch.

Viviamo i dettagli angoscianti delle sue opere, fino quasi a sentirne l’acre odore e ad apprezzare, sconvolti, l’elasticità delle carni lacerate. Il mondo rivela la sua doppiezza, l’ipocrisia strisciante e l’artista, indignato, la mostra in tutta la sua repellente virulenza.

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Il campo dell’indagine dell’artista è dunque l’uomo con le sue frustrazioni nella società e quindi l’irrealtà delle situazioni quotidiane, l’allucinante e l’assurdo che diventano normalità sono rappresentati con la perversione del realismo, la crudeltà della verità, l’inquietudine dell’ironia più dissacrante… Il suo lavoro è concentrato non tanto sui significati convenzionali delle cose e degli esseri, quanto su ciò che questi offrono di ulteriore alla vista, sull’abisso su cui si aprono e sul mondo che lasciano intravedere e in cui ci si può perdere. Il posto del pubblico è proprio sul baratro, dove deve provare il gusto di sfiorare il pericolo e la fine.” (Gilberto Finzi)

CRONOLOGIA MINIMA

1962 – Crea con Alejandro Jodorowsky e Fernando Arrabal il Movimento Panico.

Dal 1961 al 1965 – Contribuisce alla rivista satirica Hara Kiri, oltre che pubblicare vignette sul New York Times e sul Newyorker.

1965 – Crea, con il collega René Laloux, il cortometraggio di animazione Les Escargots, premio speciale della giuria al Cracovia Film Festival.

1971 – Crea i disegni per i titoli di testa di Viva la muerte (di F. Arrabal).

1973 – René Laloux dirige Il Pianeta Selvaggio (La Planète Sauvage), su disegni e sceneggiatura di Topor, basato su un romanzo di fantascienza di Stefan Wul. Il lungometraggio di animazione vince il premio della giuria al Festival di Cannes.

1974 – Topor ha un cameo in Sweet Movie di Dusan Makavejev.

1976 – Roman Polanski dirige L’inquilino del terzo piano (The Tenant) adattando il romanzo di Topor Le locataire chimérique.

1979 – Recita nel ruolo di Renfield nel Nosferatu di Werner Herzog.

1983 – Crea con Henri Xhonneux la popolare serie TV Téléchat, una parodia dei telegiornali con pupazzi di un gatto e di un’ostrica.

1989 – Con Henri Xhonneux co-scrive la sceneggiatura del film Marquis, ispirato alla vita e alle opere del Marchese de Sade. Il cast è costituito da attori in costume con maschere di animali.

Per guadagnare da vivere io non dispongo che dei prodotti derivati dalla mia paura…
La realtà in sé è orribile, mi dà l’asma. La realtà è insopportabile senza gioco,
il gioco consente un’immagine della realtà. Io non posso perdere
il contatto con la realtà, ma per sopportarla ho bisogno
di questo gioco astratto che mi permette di trovare
quello che può essere ancora umano.

(Roland Topor)